TS surface rust... PLEASE HELP!!!!!!

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Well, your first problem is using Craftsman wax on a Delta product. That'll cause problems for sure..... :)
Seriously, I use mineral spirits and a Scotchbrite pad to take rust off, and Topcote aerosol as a final protectant. If the rust is really heavy (which it shouldn't be), a single edge razor blade scraper works really well. My basement is very humid this summer owing to all the rain we've had in the Northeast, and there is no rust on any of the tool surface protected with Topcote. I haven't run any of my machines since May, so I can't say that frequent use will keep the rust off.
JonE
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Frequent use will not keep the rust off...;~) In Houston, an unprotected surface will rust over night.
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On 15 Aug 2003 20:17:27 -0700, tarance snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Bluetobb) wrote:

What colour is the table ? Silver or brown ?
Freshly machined cast iron is silver/grey. It's highly reactive with oxygen, let alone in a damp atmosphere. Leave it damp overnight and you'll come back to bright orange or dark grey waterspots.
Old iron is brown. Now this colouration is an iron oxide, but it's not "rust" as we would normally regard it. It's mechanically stable and of a good hardness. It's even regarded as a deliberate finish by gunsmiths - "browning". Abuse this surface and it will rust far less quickly than a new silver table.
Silver cast iron just isn't stable. You're not going to preserve it that way without a _lot_ of effort. One of the best preservation processes for it (assuming decades of life) is to encourage the development of an even browned finish. Avoid moisture, avoid droplets, clean up damage, but do;t get obsessive about it darkening evenly over time.
The other issue is the quality of the iron and the machining. A mirror-like silver surface can be preserved forever, if you try, but grey iron with milling marks still on it isn;t going to last out a winter, no matter what you do.
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I think Ospho is far superior to naval jelly and you don't need to brush it on because it's the consistency of water. You will use less and get better coverage if you apply it with a spray bottle. I don't wire brush it after it dries unless I get a heavy white scale. I do normally put Rustoleum Red Primer over it before painting and find it even works on barbeque pits.
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William C writes:

Jesus. My Unisaw and DJ20 will look fantastic in red primer!
Charlie Self
"A low voter turnout is an indication of fewer people going to the polls." Dan Quayle
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tables where I don't let it dry. After scrubbing with Ospho and a pad I wipe it off with paint thinner and then apply top cote.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Tony D.) wrote in

I think the official name of the rust erasers is "Sandflex blocks". I was looking through Shopnotes vol. 11 issue 69 and they also had a write up on using them w/ topcote. This is also what David Marks recommended in the workshop tour episode of D.I.Y. Woodworks.
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