TS Question

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When I verify/set my TS blade to perpendicular vs. the table, I put a right angle square on the table and align it with the blade. However, I always end up wondering whether I really lined it up with the plane of the blade or if blade teeth got in the way and I ended up with the blade a bit out of perpendicular.
It seems that someone would make a simple disk that could be installed instead of a real blade to be used for such calibration purposes. Does anyone know of such an item?
Thanks, Tex
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I align my TS with the teeth and not the flat of the blade
Searcher
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Tex wrote:
> When I verify/set my TS blade to perpendicular vs. the table, I put a > right angle square on the table and align it with the blade. However, I > always end up wondering whether I really lined it up with the plane of > the blade or if blade teeth got in the way and I ended up with the blade > a bit out of perpendicular. > > It seems that someone would make a simple disk that could be installed > instead of a real blade to be used for such calibration purposes. Does > anyone know of such an item?
Oldest trick in the book.
Raise blade full amount, then place a piece of 6" vertical stock oagainst miter gage and make a test cut about an inch from the end using the left slot for the gage.
Transfer miter gage to right hand slot, turn piece around, and make a cut thru the same slot you just cut.
If the cut edges of the slot are parallel, the blade is vertical.
If not, adjust blade as required and repeat test.
I have about as much need for a saw blade gage as a boar hog with a set of breasts.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

I just flip the cutoff and butt the two cut edges together. Any error is doubled.
Barry
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"Tex" wrote in message

There are "reference plates", instead of blades, that are used by manufacturers to set up saws with the miter slots at the factory, but doing it in a shop for setting blade angle is a bit anal, and unnecessary, IMO.
Simply use a smaller square, or Lew's method, which is fool proof and has the advantage of actually calibrating the tool _combination_ you'll be using.
IOW, it is a good idea to setup any tool with the blade/bit you're going to be using, otherwise you could well be fooling yourself.
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Go to Sears and purchase their 10" sanding disk. Remove the stick-on sandpaper, clean off any residue with mineral spirits and use that to align blades. I've cleaned mine up by mounting it and bringing it up to speed and then with a fine grit paper stuck to a 2" wide x 2 ft long board, I polished both sides then applied a coat of wax and buffed.
If you don't have sandpaper on the disc or have a rust inhibitor on it, the blade will rust in humid conditions. Since I have a rotary sander already, I don't use that disc for sanding - just for alignments. If you have a contractor type table saw that has two tie-bars - that disc works great in aligning those too. If you've never done that alignment - maybe you should check it.
Bob S.

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Ok, to check for the baled being perpendicular to the table SIMPLY make a test cut through a piece of scrap. Flop one piece over end for end and match the two cut edges back together. If you have a gap you are not cutting square to the table. If you have no gap you are set at 90 degrees.
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????? baled ????? BALDE. ;~)
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Leon wrote:

Uh, Leon?
Don't look now but... <g>
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Unquestionably Confused wrote:

You should blead insanity. Crazy 'bout that new saw.
er
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LOL...
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Leon wrote:

Hah, now you have a label.
er
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Tex wrote:

tex - No one directly answered your question. This is what you are asking for. http://www.rockler.com/ecom7/product_details.cfm?Cat_ID &1&offerings_id`39&catid=7&objectgroup_idU5&cookietest=1
Lots of good advice on alignment w/o it though.
Inviato da X-Privat.Org - Registrazione gratuita http://www.x-privat.org/join.php
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http://www.rockler.com/ecom7/product_details.cfm?Cat_ID &1&offerings_id`39&catid=7&objectgroup_idU5&cookietest=1
Thanks, everybody. After looking at the price from Rockler, I think I'll rethink my need for such an item and follow a path some of the other responders have.
Tex
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Good decision. You do not need a tool to tell you what your eyes can see.
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Manufacturers do use such plates, both disks and long plates along with special squares to set and check 90 and 45 degree blade alignment to the slot, arbor runnout, and perpendicularity to the table. I have a set, however, I've never seen them available for sale. We made our own and they had to be numbered and calibrated every so often consistent with a gage calibration procedure in a quality manual for ISO 9000.
However, a good square set on the blade body in between teeth on a quality saw blade should certainly get you as close as you need to be. If it is a quality blade any radial runout difference between the body and the plane of the teeth will be miniscule.
Frank
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Frank Boettcher wrote:

I don't think they're all that useful for the average user, compared to all of the previously mentioned methods, but:
<http://www.forrestsawbladesonline.com/category_40_MasterPlate.html
I've also seen blank Forrest and other brand saw blades. FWW has shown the Forrest blank in saw review articles.
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I don't know who would make such a thing, but in the latest issue of Fine Woodworking, when they're testing cabinet saws, they specifically show that they are using one to test calibration. (June 2006, page 48, upper picture)
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Freud certainly makes one:
http://www.freudtools.com/woodworkers/rep/sawblades/Accessories/html/Accessories_1.html
Brian Henderson wrote:

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No one mentioned the TS-Aligner Jr? http://www.ts-aligner.com /
If you want to align the blade to the miter slot
If you want to align the fence to the miter slot
If you want to align the fence to the miter slot
If you want to check that the blade is square (or any other angle) to the table
If you want to check runout on your saw arbor
If you want to check knives setting in joiner/jointer
If you want to check infeed and outfeed tables on joiner to cutter head
If you want to check drill bit to table for sqaure
If you want to check run out on your drill press and or bit
: : : This tool will do the job - accurately.
Better to know than to assume.
charlie b
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