TS kickback question

Page 2 of 2  
Swingman wrote:

Sorry, Swing. DerbyDad correctly interpreted what I wrote. The only difference I can tell is that DD used the term "butt joining". --Bill

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/18/2011 3:43 PM, Bill wrote:

Not always easy to tell from the question whether the poster is using the correct term to describe the process, which is why I posted what I did ... when it comes to technical advice, language and terminology are barriers to both giving competent advice, and the successful execution thereof.
Most folks, including many woodworkers, would offhandedly also describe the end grain of the board as an "edge", particularly if the board is equal to or wider than it is long.
This would certainly result in a complete different answer to the question about the strength of any glue up involving either one of both of the parts being wrongly described with that single term ... and perhaps a radically different result of acting on the advice than expected.
In this case if the glue joint is indeed joining two edges "long grain to long grain", which if properly done with modern glues would result in a joint that is more likely to be stronger than the wood itself, you can see how important it is to be damn certain that is indeed what is being asked.
IOW, it pays to make damned sure all parties are speaking the same language before giving advice if you want to put any faith in that advice. :)
(I recently went through three meeting with a professional kitchen designer before it was clearly understood that she had a totally mistaken notion about what a "face frame cabinet" was ... trust me, it pays to be AR about terminology in woodworking <g>)
--
www.eWoodShop.com
Last update: 4/15/2010
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Swingman wrote:

Yes, your point is well-taken.

I confess that would have confused me too. After reading at:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Face_frame ,
I now realize by "face frame cabinet" you were probably referring to the (whole) carcass.
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/18/2011 5:20 PM, Bill wrote:

Anyone assuming that an individual with a reputation as a _designer to the stars_ would be versed enough in cabinet terminology to know the difference would have been bitten in the butt when it comes to bidding/pricing:
http://kitchensandspaces.com/framed-vs-frameless?showall=1
Pays to not assume(.) :)
--
www.eWoodShop.com
Last update: 4/15/2010
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Swingman wrote:

Thanks for the lesson!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Swingman wrote:

I think my used of "edges" was correct. I made an effort. To be honest, I'm hesitant to call what is being cut a dado, but a dado blade is being used to do the cutting! : )
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Bill" wrote in message
Bill wrote:

If anyone else has seen the episode, maybe we can offer opinions on the strategy used of making a mortise by cutting a dado into the edge of each of two pieces of wood and then glueing these edges together. Maybe one can argue that the glue is stronger than the wood, but my intuition tells me that one is inviting the glue joint to fail. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The glue is stronger than the wood but the joint itself is the weak spot of the glue up. Stress riser right at the joint.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/16/2011 1:39 PM, Bill wrote: ...

That would be a rabbet, not a dado.
As for the technique, what were the dimensions of the stock and what was the size of the resulting mortise? I've done similar on very large pieces like make a 2" mortise in a large architectural post by gluing up three laminations and leaving room for the tenon in the glue-up. Essentially the same idea on a smaller scale.
A well-fitted long-grain glue joint is at least as strong as the wood in most cases; the tests show that generally the wood will break along its grain at some point rather than the glue line failing. The possible failure could be longevity...
For a beginner I'd presume it was seen as an easier expedient than hand chopping a mortise assuming the viewer doesn't have access to a mortiser...
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Could it be this one, making it Episode 507:
WOODSMITH SHOP Through Mortise & Tenon Projects Aired 11/9/2011 @ 12:00 PM
Special weekend projects, a Nantucket-style bench and a traditional wall shelf, are presented.
Episode: 507 Through Mortise & Tenon Projects Program Length: 26 Minutes 46 Seconds Educational Recording Rights: One-year rights for teachers to tape.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
DerbyDad03 wrote:

Yes, that's the one. The sawing discussed here occurs early, the first time they go to the TS.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.