TS Blade Aligner DIY

Hey,
I posted a short video on my website that shows how to make and use a homemade blade/jointer fence alignment jig.
Let me know what you think (either on my site or here or both?). I think I may have discussed this jig a while back, but I never had a video until now.
http://www.garagewoodworks.com/shop_talk.php
Regards Brian
www,garagewoodworks.com
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Nice little video BUT!
IIRC you have/ had the TS Aligner. Why not use it? and, would your jig only be as accurate as your square?
Now for me, I use a digital tilt box and before that simply cut a board, flipped one piece and brough the two pieces back together. No gap, dead on. Gap, readjust and retest.
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Yes. I still have the aligner. I made this jig 'before' I acquired the aligner. My jig can't do everything the aligner does, but it is a good alternative for those that already have dial indicators laying around and don't want to spend the cash.
Yes, it is only as accurate as the square. That's why I state in the video to use a "good quality square".
No test cuts required with my jig or the TS aligner.
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Yes. I still have the aligner. I made this jig 'before' I acquired the aligner. My jig can't do everything the aligner does, but it is a good alternative for those that already have dial indicators laying around and don't want to spend the cash.
Yes, it is only as accurate as the square. That's why I state in the video to use a "good quality square".
Well a good quality square can be way off. ;~) I guess you would need to insure it was still accurate.
No test cuts required with my jig or the TS aligner.
Yeah.... I really don't have to do any test cuts either as my 90 and 45 degree stops are still dead on after 10 years of use. Fortunately the stops are angled so that no dust collects on them or the adjustment bolts. Unfortunately no dial indicator will predict how a piece of wood is going to swell, cup, bow, bend etc. after being cut or attached so regardless as to ones degree of AR, and I can be that way at times, there is a point where acuracy is overwhelmed by mother nature's natural products.
Given that, with the confidence that I have in my equipement a test cut is much faster way for me to insure the blade setting than setting up a jig each time I tilt the blade. I always cut the end off of every board 2-3 inches to rid them of the end splits, the waste piece is simply flipped and checked.
That said you have a neat jig and I would highly advise checking with a tool of this type on occasion but for the most part if the saw or what ever piece of equipment you use it on consistantly produces expected results, I like to use faster ways to confirm blade settings.
Good job!
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I'm sure this is tongue in cheek, but I will respond anyway. Most people will be using a square to align there blade either way. The inaccuracy of the square, what ever it is, is unavoidable. By using the square to check for blade square you add MORE error by 'looking' for gaps. Yeah I know, you can use feeler gauges, but who ever does? Plus this adds on to the procedure time.
My jig or the TS-aligner get you there accurately and quickly. No test cuts, no feeler gauges.

I don't trust mine.

None at all? ;^)

No. But why not eliminate error when we can? If your wood bows and cups that much after jointing, cutting etc. you might need to examine your lumber selection process.

Its a good 'zen' like feeling to know you have it balls on accurate before cutting expensive lumber.

Thanks Leon.

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