Trying to repair loose joints on INDOOR teak chair

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wrote:

problems. Then assemble the parts back into a chair, using proper fasteners, and possibly non-epoxy glue that will allow future dissassembly. Epoxy could be used to fasten dowels into one part, particularly if the dowel fit in that part is loose due to wear. If the hole the dowel fits to in the other part is also sloppy, epoxy can be used to build up the material around the hole to resize and re-enforce it. Drill the repaired hole to the right size for the dowel, and re-assemble.
Just one or 2 ways epoxy can be used without making it impossible to dissassemble and repair in the future.
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Dick Snyder wrote:

whit3rd wrote:

I would certainly hope not.
Properly done, the epoxy repaired joint will out last the wood.
Lew
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+1
That's what I was thinkin. Done right, it should not have needed repair now. Do it right and it will never need repair again.
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On 6/10/2014 9:04 PM, Morgans wrote:

But often chairs are broken and not at a joint. Then what do you do when you need a to replace a part and the ends in the joint are not coming out.
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I wrote:

--------------------------------------------
"Leon" wrote:

Getting involved with a hypothetical is a road to nowhere IMHO.
Examination of the damage on a case by case event when it has happened is another matter.
It's amazing what kind of repairs can be made with a little glass, some resin, a little filler and some imagination.
Lew
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On 6/11/2014 12:41 AM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

When it comes to things made of wood, the lack of foresight in that statement is pretty much what's wrong with this lazy minded culture.
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On 6/11/2014 12:41 AM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

One could easily say the same thing about being prepared for the unsuspected when sailing.
Actually it is quite likely that this chair in question will have a broken part in the future. It is not much of a hypothetical stretch to consider a chair that is used enough to loosen the joints will need to be repaired again in the future in some other way. Assemble it with epoxy and you essentially make future repairs much more difficult or impossible. Part of this societies, throw away mentality vs. built to be repaired, mentality I guess.
So the hood on my truck vibrates on the highway because the latch does not hold it securely. If I epoxy it in place, problem solved?

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