Try, try again - floor poly questions (or, to gloss, or not to gloss)

Posted a question here a couple weeks ago or so regarding floor poly.
Given some excellent advice here, I thought I was finished after laying down the "final" coat, resorting to a satin finish (over the previous coats of problematic semi gloss). Except that I don't like the way satin looks in the kitchen. It's a very matte finish. Doesn't make the walnut "pop".
So, I want to lay the final-final coat, either in semi gloss, or straight up gloss.
What are the pros and cons (in a kitchen, particularly) of these 2 finishes. I already have found that semi gloss is a pain to get to look right, being mighty picky about overlaps when laying it down and showing any little speck that may have found it's way into the finish while it was drying.
I'm interested in both application differences and stuff like wear, appearance, etc. plus any thing that might be of particular note for a kitchen. And, any tricks that might be useful.
Way back when, having sanded nearly an 1/8" off an existing oak floor ('nother house), applying the finish was problem free and fast (using the l-w pads).
Also, I'm finding that using the lamb's wool pad is making it very difficult to lay down the manufacturer recommended amount - 800-900 sq ft/gallon and I'm getting about ~500sq ft/gal. I'm pouring a stream of finish in a line down the floor then coming at it with the pad. But, I"m thinking maybe I ought go round up one of those T-Bars that was recommended here. Agree? Or is there a way to correct this using the pads?
Thanx Renata
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I do not know if this still holds or not but--- 10 years ago, when I did my floor, I was told that matte looked good in bedrooms and such, and Gloss looked better elsewhere.
I took the installers advice, with 1 caveat, I used 90-100 sheen as the 80-sheen, which is what they told me was gloss did not "pop" the oak. Really made a difference in my kitchen and living rooms.
There will be no problem putting the high gloss over the matte as it is the final coat (?) that gives the shine.
Also, what one gets from the store is not what the professionals get. Their poly is a different mix and is much more noxious that what a non-professional gets. Results seem different too - at least to me.
P D Q

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80-sheen, which is what they told me was gloss did not "pop" the oak. Really made a difference in my kitchen and living rooms.

Except the underlying coats of semi-gloss and satin will obscure the grain somewhat.
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Agreed, but it all depends upon how much obscurity was included in the matte finish in the first place.
As a rule, a whole pile of "sheen" goes on first and the final coat is "matte". If there is only 1 coat of matte, there will not be a great deal of obscuring going on. The more matte the more obscurity.
This is the exact reason my first load of "sheen" ended up in the bedrooms and my last load ended up in the kitchen and living room. I'm sure glad I started in the bedrooms rather than the other way around.
P D Q
wrote:

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If there is only 1 coat of matte, there will not be a great deal of obscuring going on. The more matte the more obscurity.

my last load ended up in the kitchen and living room. I'm sure glad I started in the bedrooms rather than the other way around.

When I used to use poly on some furniture pieces I made, a friend and fellow ww'er told me the formula was 2 coats of gloss to give depth followed by a coat of satin. Remember, this is furniture, which one presumably doesn't want to look like plastic. He could do wonders with poly, but put in a lot of effort (more than 3 coats, as well).
Now, floors, a bit different. I used satin before and it had a teeny bit of shine to it. This stuff today is really flat. I used the satin because it was on a refinished floor that wasn't pristine.
My kitchen floor is newly laid walnut.
But, I did have some concern whether the single satin coat would "inhibit" the effect. I hope not, because while it's gonna get a light sanding, my plan is to lay the gloss right on top of the satin. Unless I hear otherwise from y'all or in my research elsewhere.
Thanx Renata
PS I'm looking for experience based replies. I know I can google up all kinds of stuff. Thanx

80-sheen, which is what they told me was gloss did not "pop" the oak. Really made a difference in my kitchen and living rooms.

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