Try Squares v. Combo Squares

This is an oblique response to the question on the accuracy of Starrett Combo Squares v. other manufacturers.
Although the Starrett is a first rate combo square, it still cannot compete with a good quality try square in terms of repeatable accuracy over the life of the tool, due to that fact that it has moving parts that are subject to wear.
The Marples 9" "Shockproof" (no longer manufactured - r.i.p.) was manufactured to conform to the British Standard 3322 of +- 0.01mm per cm of blade length. (El Sauro has its mate and can check it against his Athol Collection).
The Ulmia has a stated tolerance of +- 0.10mm over the length of the 35cm blade.
I've used both of these try squares for a number of years and reach for one of them to check squareness of cut rather than for the Starrett Combo Square.
For machinery setup I use a Starrett No.20 Engineers Square.
I periodically check these squares, using a Starrett No.380 Machinist's Straightedge as a reference and have never had a need to adjust them.
The point, as it relates to the question of the OP, is that it is cheaper to manufacture a dead on try square than a dead on combo square and the try square provides a third, economical option to the Starrett v. Other Manufacturers dilemma. (remember, even god never made a square johnson)
I fear that the preferential usage of the combo square over the try square is a direct result of the influence of Brother Norm and his Carpenterish ways.
We should seek to overcome this influence, insofar as we aspire to the heights of craftsmanship implied by the search for accuracy that must be measured in angstrom units and its application to a material whose deformities are measured in fractional inches.
I remain, tongue very much in cheek,
Y.O.B. (yer obstinate bastige)
Regards, Tom Thomas J. Watson-Cabinetmaker Gulph Mills, Pennsylvania http://users.snip.net/~tjwatson
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I like one that is cast or machined with no moving parts. There is a lot less margin for error, operator or otherwise.
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Tom Watson wrote:

    mahalo,     j. johnson
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TJW:

I prefer a combo (shouldn't it be combi?) over others onna 'count of I use the adjustability of the blade projection for lay out work. Been doing this long before Norm came on TeeBee.
UA100
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wrote:

Dearest El Sauro:
If'n ya wanna use da wrong tool fer da yob, dat's yer lookout.
Howsomever, if'n yer is interested in der accuracy of der t'ing, 'tis best ter use der try square ter try ter get der t'ing square.
Fer de alternate usage yas described, I recommends da Ulmia 315K Streichmab, mit der zingle und dooble cutters.
BTW - combo ist zingular und combi ist plural, yust like concerto be singular und concerti be plural, aldough we must give conzideration to der fact dat concertos has come into common usage, albeit only by der peoples wid low foreheads.
Regards, Tom Thomas J. Watson-Cabinetmaker Gulph Mills, Pennsylvania http://users.snip.net/~tjwatson
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How would one adjust a square.
I a really nice looking rosewood and brass 6" square that I bought last year (British company manufactured in India - can't remember the name) that is off considerably. (I also have a 3" engineers square that I found in my grandfathers garage. It's about 50 years old, rusted, and most of the markings are gone. You guessed it - it's dead on accurate)
Is there a way to fix it or did I buy an expensive paper weight?
-Chris
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On 30 Sep 2003 11:24:11 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@mybluelight.com (Chris) wrote:

You would have to lap the inside edge until it's square to the brass.
Regards, Tom Thomas J. Watson-Cabinetmaker Gulph Mills, Pennsylvania http://users.snip.net/~tjwatson
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On 30 Sep 2003, Tom Watson spake unto rec.woodworking:

    That would take forever, wouldn't it? Not to mention the wear and tear on one's tongue. Do you think a cat could be trained to do it?
Scott
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On Tue, 30 Sep 2003 19:20:38 GMT, Scott Cramer

Yes.
cf Red Lion Abrasive Compounds
http://www.divinebrothers.com/products_c.html
Regards, Tom Thomas J. Watson-Cabinetmaker Gulph Mills, Pennsylvania http://users.snip.net/~tjwatson
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