try square question

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We have the Websters New World College Dictionary, Fourth Edition Copyright 1999 that was used for reference. Difficult for an engineer to find moving "standards", but in todays' environment maybe I'll take that back. Thanks.
On Sun, 11 Jul 2004 13:15:06 -0400, "J. Clarke"

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Several years ago, in a programing class, the instructor kept using "O" in place of zero when addressing the class and as his examples where on a chalkboard (yes, more than a few years ago), the difference wasn't obvious. It was several days of this before we actually got to run anything. By that time, "O" was firmly ingrained in our minds. I, for one, was not to pleased when I tried to run some code that, of course, wouldn't run because the instructor had been sloppy.
wrote:

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adddress@spam free.com> says...

And I still remember the controversy over whether we should put a slash through the letter or the number so the keypunchers could tell which we meant.
I finally resorted to putting a note at the top of each coding sheet that said which was slashed - but it's been so long I don't remember which that was :-).
--
Where ARE those Iraqi WMDs?

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Zero has the slash. On occassion, we'd put a dot in the middle of the "Oh" .
Renata
On Sun, 11 Jul 2004 16:00:12 -0700, Larry Blanchard

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wrote:

Sloppy? It's perfectly good English; North American as well as European English. That's how any one I know says it when stating their phone number. When you hear an area code "205 -..." don't you pronounce it "Two Oh Five - ..."?
I've also programmed and taught it, and if you used an "O" instead of a Zero [slash-O], it was because of your own lack of comprehension at the time, using alpha instead of numeric out of context. I had to help a person who said he'd "written a program" when in fact he'd simply copied it wrongly, not understanding what a DIM statement actually did, setting aside storage. It should have made sense at the time, or you would have, or should have asked at that time.
Bill.
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When I pronounce my area code, I always pronounce it "three-zero-six".
But then, I'm a bit strange (or so I've been told).
djb
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As you should. Just because others can't speak correctly doesn't mean you have to fallow their lead.

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On Sun, 11 Jul 2004 17:56:15 -0600, Dave Balderstone

Ain't got no "Oh"s or "Zero"s in my phone number. Got several "niners" 'though.
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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"Oh" in the phone number is a bad holdover from the days when we dialed "Operator" for all the long distance calls. Anybody who served in the military should have been quickly broken of the habit because of the confusion it can cause.
rhg
Tom Veatch wrote:

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Yep, made us stroke through the zero when hand-copying.
Still say "decimal" instead of "dot" sometimes out of habit.

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As a long time radio opperator, the importance of being understood was ingrained in me a long time ago. No, I NEVER say O when I mean zero. It is just plain sloppy. Have you ever programed a robot in G code? If not, you have no idea what you are talking about. Letters and numbers are mixed and they are NOT interchangable.

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wrote:

ALL of England, Canada, and so far as I know the U.S. telephone operators say "Oh". "Zero" is for the military.

Not "G-code", but assembler [and plain hex dumps] among several high level languages, and I certainly realise that "alphanumeric" code still distinguishes O and 0, and that they are not interchangeable. That is precisely the point. You blamed your teacher for your own [at that time] lack of understanding. The logical context should have given you the clue, not the pronunciation.
Enough already. It's about a "try square".
Bill.
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Bill Rogers wrote:

While they may do that, it's sloppy. There is a letter "O" on the US telephone dial and it corresponds to the "6", not the zero.

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
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Fortran instructor cautioned us to AVOID using Oh for zero when punching cards for the IBM 3600 (I think was the model). That was almost 40 years ago. CBS radio in Los Angeles has a computer "guru" weekends that uses Oh consistently in phone NUMBERS. Still feel it's throwing a curve at youngsters when it comes time to work with computers.
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snipped-for-privacy@vcoms.net wrote:

Oh for zero and eye for 1 are probably the two most common errors in FORTRAN programming. I never will forget watching a PhD computer scientist struggling with one of her programs one time. After pounding into us "use meaningful variable names" she wrote "DO 100, I (the letter eye)=I (the letter I) TO 100" and then couldn't for the life of her figure out why it wasn't behaving as expected. (note--please don't bellyache about my syntax--it's been about 20 years since I wrote my last line of FORTRAN).
It doesn't help that I through (IIRC) N are implicit integers in FORTRAN so the lazy programmer's instinctive reaction is to use I for the the loop counter.

--
--John
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Yeah... LOL dictionaries and their definitions become obsolete as quickly as computers do.
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Nice comeback, but it's a miss, I think. Isn't it the case that better quality ruled squares use etching for the divisions? I agree that stamping the divisions could have unhappy effects on the rule's accuracy. Viz my POS framing square...
--
"Keep your ass behind you."

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Not a miss at all. The OP specified both stamped and etched. In any case, stamping does not necessarily have any detrimental effect on accuracy. It depends on the sequence of operations.
message free.com> wrote:

straight
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incorrect...
In any case,

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Yes, you usually are.

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