try square question

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I guess in the States you sure have different words for things than the rest of the world. A Tri square is the correct terminology not try square here in Canada and in Europe for the tool we are speaking about.Here is a link so you can see that I am not the only one who calls this tool by that name. http://www.shopv.co.uk/productfinder/10-ALUM-TRI-SQUARE.html
Chris A proud Canadian Eh!

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Sorry I sent the last reply from my wifes laptop I should of sent it from my PC so it would of showen from myself sorry once again.
Chris

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On Sat, 10 Jul 2004 07:06:40 GMT, "Candice Markham"

I'm from Europe, living in Canada many years, and was one who suggested the definition of "try" square. The difference is really an agreement among those who posted, just looking at two only slightly different tools. The Try square has a base at right angles to the steel part, and the Tri square has the same, but also with a 45 degree bevel.
Here's one site that offers **both**:
http://www.profhdwr.com/squares.htm
Bill
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Bill Rogers wrote:

FWIW, the Oxford Unabridged does not mention the existence of a "tri-square" but they do define a "try-square" for which a synonym is "trial-square", and define it as "a carpenter's tool for laying off short perpendiculars". On the other hand we may be observing a linguistic shift in progress.
--
--John
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Or, something more insidious - I smell the Marketing Dept at work. Tri (Triple Functionality: Try, 45, ruled) Square
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patrick conroy wrote:

Yep, but the Marketing Department often changes the language. See for example "Kleenex", "Velcro", and "Xerox", all of which have "generic" alternatives but all of which are often referred to in the generic by those brand names.
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"J. Clarke" wrote:

I didn't quite understand that statement, but my interpretation is that you are saying Marketing Departments are responsible for using Trademark names in place of the general term, such as using Thermos to refer to any vacuum bottle or Fridgedare for any refrigerator. If that is correct, then your premimis is wrong. "Kleenex", "Velcro", "Xerox" and a great many other trade names were the first of their kind or the dominant brand. It is just people at large with their normal sloppy language that started using the brand name for any product of that kind. In fact, the marketing people fought against using their "trade name" as a general term. As an example Thermos was constantly advertising that not all vacuum bottles were not a Thermos and indicated or infered that a Thermos was the superior product.
I think applying Occams Sword, to the "tri-square" question would indicate that hasn't any subtle or insidious intrepretation. Rather, it is likely due to common misunderstanding, ignorance, and laziness.
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George E. Cawthon wrote:

Regardless, the marketing department makes up the word that then becomes part of the vernacular. If nobody had made up the words "Xerox", "Kleenex", "Velcro", "Thermos", etc then they would not be part of the language.
By the way, you want to see people get confused, mention "Nissan Thermos"--people think you're talking about a premium that comes with a car.

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--John
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I thought it was a razor. Which simply points out that it is a marketing gimmick. Give away the razor and sell the blades.
Nice attempt at a diversion. "Look! There's Elvis!"
You're a member of the Cabal aren't you?
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TINC
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mttt wrote:

Damn. You're right it is razor. Must have been thinking of the Gordian knot.Giving away the razor and paying thru the nose for the blades (same with ink printers) IS a marketing gimmick. But what we were talking about isn't one. Cabal. Nope we don't need not stinking cabals.
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Take a look at the spelling in the link if you have never heard of a Tri square unless I need glasses it says Tri nor try.
Chris

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Tool dealers make as many nomenclature mistakes as anyone. How do you think scroll saw and jigsaw got switched over the years? Try is correct. tri is a misspelling. The 45 has nothing to do with it.

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I have now, however, added "tri" to my mental vocabulary to describe those try squares which include the 45 bevel. (I hate them.) "Tri square" could be a useful, although internally inconsistent, neologism.
--
"Keep your ass behind you."

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On Sat, 10 Jul 2004 19:22:44 -0500, Australopithecus scobis

that's a combination square....
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snipped-for-privacy@thanks.com wrote:

There are try-squares that have a short bevel as well--the ones that do also generally have a levelling vial in the "handle".
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I think he may be describing a non adjustable try/tri square that has a "short" 45 degree edge where the 2 pieces are joined. If you line that 45 degree edge up to the edge of your board, the long end of the square will be at a 45 degree angle to the edge of the board.
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From the dictionary,
The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition
try square n. A carpenter's tool consisting of a ruled metal straightedge set at right angles to a straight piece, used for measuring and marking square work.
And I always thought it was tri square until I could not find it in the dictionary
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Yabbut dictionaries now show Zero = Oh.
On Sat, 10 Jul 2004 18:30:42 GMT, "Leon"

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snipped-for-privacy@vcoms.net wrote:

That's why it's important to be careful about dictionaries. The ones in English that "count" are Merriam-Webster (note--the "Merriam" is important--a kid can write one in crayon and sell it as "Webster" without the "Merriam") for the American language and Oxford for British--there's one for Australian as well but I don't know if it's the Macquarie or the Australian Oxford. FWIW, Oxford has a page and a half of very fine print on "Zero", and at no point in that body of discussion is it suggested that "zero" is synonymous with the letter "O".

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--John
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