True Confessions: Saftey gear

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What eye safety do you use? What lung safety do you use?
I think it is really a bigger question. I hate to admit it but I have just never fully solved this issue. I always wear hearing protection, usually ear muffs. I mostly ware lung protection but for years I have just used crappy cloth dusk masks from HF or HD. I always fog up my eye protection so it is always the first to go. Unless I have my face in router spew, I usually just have lung and eye protection.
I probably need an actual respirator that seals better and won't fog my safety specs. Just looking for your input.
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Ware? How the heck did I get that spelling?
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Because you live and breathe an awareness of safety issues?
Regards,
Edward Hennessey
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On Mon, 14 Jun 2010 11:11:25 -0700 (PDT), "SonomaProducts.com"

How about "saftey"? Don't drink and post, eh?
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Impeach 'em ALL!
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Lungs - the crappy paper masks and heavy duty vacuum dust control
Hearing - standard muffs
Eyes - full face shield - had a turned bowl blow up in process and a piece clipped the shield instead of my head! the face shield does not seem to fog as quickly as glasses with side protection do.
That said, this is strictly hobby for me.
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With very little exception I wear (where?) a Trend and hearing protection at all times. When I am using my drill press with a vacuum hose at the source I sometimes forego the Trend but a face shield is in its place. I have about 5 face shields and hearing protectors each in my shop and these are presented to any guests that might show up. I also offer them the Moldex 2200N95 dust mask (it's like an underwire bra for your face). My wife has a Trend too which she wears when she helps out. I use Festool sanders with their vacuum so I sometimes forego the Trend again with this step but I prefer using it to eliminate that dust which does get away from the vac. Marc
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*snip*

*snip*
You too? I've spent more money than I'd like on safety glasses and goggles that just fog up. Anti-fog coverings give me about 2 minutes more before they fog up. I think the problem is simply not enough air flow.
When I wear "normal" safety goggles, they don't fog up. Those are the kind with an array of holes drilled in the top and bottom. Try to get something to keep the dust out, and everything starts fogging.
What I'd do if I was designing these things is drastically up the number of vent locations. The last new pair I bought had 1 row of vents, I'd have 6 or 7. Open vents on the bottom. They're woodworking goggles, not chemical splash goggles, so they need only keep the dust to a minimum.
Sorry if this is a little soap-boxy, but you've hit on a source of quite a bit of frustration.
Puckdropper
--
Never teach your apprentice everything you know.

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Since I used to do a fair amount of metal work, I always went with a hard hat with everything. So the eye, ear and lung protection had to go with a hard hat. I went down to an industrial safety supply house and got a matched set.
And yes, the face shield does for up. But I just keep wiping it off. I can't tell you how many times that hard hat - face shield combo saved my ass. Or more specifically certain portions of my face and head.
For things that are safer, that do not require a face shield, I just go with ear muffs and a respirator of some kind.
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Sometime ago I saw a chart, perhaps in Popular Science or Mechanics, which gave the dB output of common power tools and appliances. The most startling recollection was how many machines advised the user to wear both ear plugs and ear muffs in conjunction for maximum protection. Considering how permanent damage done to the ears is, this seemed an adoptable precaution.
Everybody complains how quickly face shields tend toward the opaque with any use. Better that than the eyes. There is a face shield for acids made which gives the wearer the appearance of a lucite flying nun going backwards. But for ricochets and the unanticipated, it soars.
When a unanimous declaration names goggles that won't fog, the line will lengthen by me. On some occasions I use goggles that take a replaceable screen insert (intended for loggers) over a pair of safety glasses. The screens permit air flow; the glasses stay clear and sustain few scratches.
Paper filter masks always imperfectly bring to mind Dumbo's feather. What they protect is a foolhardy notion of false economy. An MSA twin cartridge safety mask is super but facial hair doesn't benefit any seal. People who don't use them always open up with "Isn't that hot?" or "What about all that uncomfortable weight on your face?" Along that line of reasoning, shoes wouldn't appear attractive. But with 10 minutes of actually doing something wearing a mask, the novelty--and any discomfort initially felt--is a forgotten memory. By the way, there is a selection of cartridges for different airborne compounds available from MSA to fit your circumstances.
Another caveat from experience has to do with solvents soaked into your clothing. After seeing someone having a flood of gas drenching his unmentionables, you don't want to hear the results of not changing yourself pronto if that happens to you.
Regards,
Edward Hennessey
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Reminds me of a story my brother told.
He was cutting up jalepeos for pickling and went for a piss. Now everybody would wash their hands after going for a leak but, before???
He rturns to the cutting board to continue food prep, then runs to the bathroom in flames.
Hot stuff like that doesn't really wash off once soaked into the skin... pretty exiting for the first 10-15 minutes...OUCH....LOL
Another caveat from experience has to do with solvents soaked into your clothing. After seeing someone having a flood of gas drenching his unmentionables, you don't want to hear the results of not changing yourself pronto if that happens to you.
Regards,
Edward Hennessey
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snipped-for-privacy@www.giganews.dm> wrote:

Friend of mine learned that lesson a few years ago. He'd been doing yard work. Didn't know he'd been handling poison ivy.
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wrote:

Guy did Playboy cartoons way back in early 60s did a cartoon on who touched whom where after the poison ivy ... Hilarious.
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On Jun 14, 9:02pm, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

My son was cleaning up the yard to make some money and got into some poison ivy. He wasn't too bad, but just picking his clothes off the floor and moving them 3' to the washing machine was enough to give SWMBO a *severe* case. It was everywhere, even where women *really** don't want it. I'm not allergic to it, but don't tempt fate either.
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I hope that
SWMBO is not "single white male best offer", in this case...LOL
wrote:

My son was cleaning up the yard to make some money and got into some poison ivy. He wasn't too bad, but just picking his clothes off the floor and moving them 3' to the washing machine was enough to give SWMBO a *severe* case. It was everywhere, even where women *really** don't want it. I'm not allergic to it, but don't tempt fate either.
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snipped-for-privacy@www.giganews.dm> wrote:
[top posting fixed - please stop doing that]

http://lmgtfy.com/?q=swmbo
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wrote:

I have an older brother that is allergic to poison ivy, I'm not. We would fight and any time it looked like he was going to best me poison ivy provided me safe passage. Not much good in a rock fight though.
basilisk
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On 6/14/2010 8:58 PM, Josepi wrote:

Obviously you have never worked in a chemical laboratory. It is more important to wash going in that coming out. The chemicals will kill what ever is on your skin, but will corrode any skin that they may be inadvertently left on for a long period of time.
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Then there was that time with the Crazy Glue.....
I don't like to talk about it anymore but,
the rest of the town does....LOL
Obviously you have never worked in a chemical laboratory. It is more important to wash going in that coming out. The chemicals will kill what ever is on your skin, but will corrode any skin that they may be inadvertently left on for a long period of time.
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Ken:
I deliberately didn't put "my" in the relevant sentence written above; sorry for any misleading. The particular experience recollected was the most profitable of all kinds: indirect and another's.
And if we turn your second sentence (as you obviously meant) into "It's more important to wash coming out than going in", we are two heads of one mind. Don't let some suspect it "it" get on you and you don't have to worry what it might do to you. How many compounds that are sold as safe today will be banned forever in some regrettable tomorrow? More than one.
Surprisingly, we both neglected to mention glove usage with energetic chemicals and the makeshift but excellent idea of a fan to disperse any troublesome vapors when that doesn't complicate things like finishing.
A glove box is a great utility for grinding, blasting and disassembling machines just dying to spin off small parts or launch springs into the parallel 9th dimension. Also, they come in handy for chemical treatment of things that might not be attractive doing for the operator in a yard covered with 5' of deep sky flake.
Speaking as Josepi did of plants, Euphorbias are a rich group of African succulents that have members with a juice so toxic it is used for fishing over thataway. If anyone saw the great movie "The Gods Must Be Crazy" there was a vivid scene where the good guys shot up some Euphorbia trees over the enemy who surrounded them, giving them a dripping sap bath which caused them to dance on down the road. Anybody who took in the film would remember that, the Bushman with the great face and his click language.
Regards,
Edward Hennessey
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Keith!!!:
Soon as I sent the preceeding post--after talking with one Ken--I realized I pulled a dunderhead transfer and gave you a new alias. Please have my open apologies for the slip.
Regards,
Edward Hennessey
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