Troubleshooting magnetic start switch (MA-15) on Grizzly G1023S table saw

This forum was helpful in troubleshooting my problem, so I wanted to contribute my findings.
I've had a Grizzly G1023S for about 6 years. It's a fantastic saw, but it stopped running yesterday. I pressed the start button, and for a fraction of a second it got juice, then nothing. I wasn't able to get anything after that point.
Here is the troubleshooting process I should have used: - Use a multimeter to verify 240V at the wall. Should be approx 240V. - Open the magnetic start switch (If you look very closely at the bottom of the switch, the word "open" is molded into the plastic. Push there.)
With the saw plugged into the 240V outlet: - Use a multimeter to verify the voltage between L1 and ground. Should be approx 120V. *** THIS WAS MY PROBLEM *** - Use a multimeter to verify the voltage between L3 and ground. Should be approx 120V.
With the saw unplugged: - Verify the resistance between the ground on the plug and ground inside the switch (should be approx 0 Ohms) - Verify the resistance between one power prong on the plug and L1 inside the switch (should be approx 0 Ohms) *** THIS WAS MY PROBLEM *** - Verify the resistance between the other power prong on the plug and L3 inside the switch (should be approx 0 Ohms)
This confirmed my problem. I checked the length of the power cord, and it was all intact. I knew it must be in the plug. When I opened the end of the plug, I found the red wire was broken where it connects to the power prong. I wired up a replacement and I'm back in business.
I hope this helps someone else.
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Burke LaShell wrote:

    jo4hn
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Dang. Nice test procedure. I have had a 1023s for about 6-7 years and have also been happy. Hope I'm not next in line. But if so, I know what to do.
RonB
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remorse .....your trouble shooting and easy resolution gave me great relief.... I just ordered Griz 1023SL last week....Thanks Rod

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I'm am shopping from the same catalog! What made you choose The Grizzly 1023 over the Grizzly G0690? Price benefit/value? Riving knife not important?
Congratulations on your new saw! I hope you'll share your experience with delivery/setup.
Bill
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It was a tough choice especially since price (for once) wasn't the defining issue but off their web site the 1023SL is currently 25% off ($795 + $94 shipping) so I guess perceived value trumped a slight riving knife preference, interestingly the G0690 ($1125 + $144 shipping) is about 75lbs heavier so I hope the slight ease of getting the lighter saw into my basement shop isn't sacrificed against a possibly more substantial saw. I did like the overall impression of the 1023SL from reviews and its proven track record..... I've rarely seen anyone complain about the 1023...... Turkey Day (I do a large dinner) and a new saw in the same week should make a interesting priority choice <G>. Indeed I'll pass along my shipping/setup impressions......Rod
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Rod & BJ Jacobson wrote:

If it were me, I couldn't think of a better "after TG-dinner activity" than to help get that ~300 pound box into the basement while you've got some able-bodied family members around. It might even turn into some sort of a contest... : )
I may be one of the few around here that like the cast iron router table extension (most likely, because I'm a beginner and don't have another router table). I think it is an attractive add-on for the price--and I don't believe its an option on the G0690.
I hope that moving your saw into the basement is not too difficult. Gravity is on your side. Are you going to use a refrigerator dolly? Good luck!
Bill
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On Sun, 22 Nov 2009 21:55:10 -0800, "Rod & BJ Jacobson"

No need to feel any buyers remorse. I have the same saw. It's a great saw.
Of course, like any comparable saw, the blade guard/splitter assembly is total crap.

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Jim Weisgram wrote:

So where is the first step where apologies like this don't have to be made? Does the Grizzly G0690 qualify?
Bill
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wrote:

I haven't seen the G0690 in action so I don't know. Overall the TS certainly looks like a winner for Grizzly. But as for the blade guard? Hard to judge what you haven't seen.
What to look for? In my book:
* Can you raise the cover up and have it stay in place while you line up your cut with the blade? Don't know about the cover on the G0650.
* Can you see through the cover? Some saws with riving knives come with metal covers. The Griz uses polycarbonate, a good choice.
* Is it mechanically solid? The blade guard on my 1023 is wobbly and more than once has slid over an contacted the blade, which then merrily grinds away at the cover. Generally on a miter cut. Probably to do with the overall size of the metal "splitter" assembly. A saw with a riving knife system will by it's nature have a smaller and probably stiffer piece of metal holding the blade guard. Possibly a safety issue, maybe no more than an annoyance.
* Are the pawls functional? Some pawls won't prevent a piece of wood from sliding back towards the operator. I've heard some people deal with this by sharpening them. Hmm, hopefully not so sharp you can cut yourself on them.
* How easy to put in and remove the riving knife? How easy to adjust/align? The G0690 looks to have a good system for putting in and taking off and aligning it.
* It looks like you access the mechanism to unlock and remove the riving knife through a cut out in the left rear of the throat plate. I would guess that means an extra step when making a zero clearance throat plate. Maybe that is a better arrangement than accessing the mechanism while holding up the throat plate to get access to the lock under the table topo.
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Jim,
I learned a lot from your post. Thank you!
Bill

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That is what is so great about this group. People helping people Warren
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