Tropical hardwoods and your conscience

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WD wrote:

Conserving it just puts the day of reckoning a little farther off. Even if we all ride bicycles it's going to run out eventually. And don't say "more time to work on substitutes". A substitute will happen when the price of the substitute is less than the price of oil. There are plenty of them but no incentive to develop any of them.
--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
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Why ride bicycles or worry when the day of reckoning is a little further away and the 2nd coming of Christ maybe just around the corner? :-)
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wrote:

That you G.W.?
--
Owen Lowe and his Fly-by-Night Copper Company
Offering a shim for the Porter-Cable 557 type 2 fence design.
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Why would you even care if it doesn't cost you anything? I would think that anyone spending money in an economy with high fuel prices would excite someone who depends on consumer spending to make their living. Your audience is slowly but surely dying off. You should embrace anyone whom has the money to buy anything. Woodworking is not a hobby for the faint of heart or paycheck to paycheck type of individual. While machinery may be cheap, after market sales aren't. The dolt you so proudly speak of, could quite well be a customer of the people who pay you to write the articles you do.
Charlie Self wrote:

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Cody Hart responds:

Well, as a start, it doesn't cost me anything at the moment, but it is going to cost my grandchildren and their children something. The waste is not in petroleum alone, but in steel, aluminum, plastics, leather and rubber, among other materials. Actually, I'd guess that a check of pricing on a pair of shoes might find some upward tension based on the use of a great deal of leather in the huge number of luxury vehicles now being turned out. Might not, too, but it's possible.
I don't embrace "anyone who has the money to buy anything" but you're welcome to do so. The thought tends to make me gag.
Woodworking is not a hobby for the...paycheck to paycheck type? Nice of you to let us know. Woodworking is a hobby for anyone who desires to work wood, and great expenditures of money are a nice thing for some, but are a long way from being an essential of the hobby.
And the dolt I spoke of, not proudly, as he is not mine, nor am I proud of his asininity, may well be a customer of the people for whom I write articles. So what? This isn't Woodcraft. Are you going to run and tell every editor in the U.S. that Charlie Self thinks energy pigs are dolts?
Whoopee.
Charlie Self "If you want to know what God thinks of money, just look at the people he gave it to." Dorothy Parker
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I've wondered about all the leather being used today in automobiles and even home furniture. I wonder if the pricing is low compared to 20 years ago because of the proliferation of McDonalds and the like. After making burgers, those outer cow packages have to be used for something. Next time you pass through the drive-up window you could be ordering kin of your seats. Ed
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Charlie Self wrote:

What is it going to cost them?

Which is recyclable.

Which is recyclable.

Another way of saying "oil".

Give me a _break_. I guess we shouldn't eat either either lest our descendants suffer a shortage of beef. Or are you not aware that leather comes off the same cow as your Big Mac.

AKA tree sap grown commercially on plantations.

And of course there's no "upward tension" from leather coats and furniture and so on? Most of the price of shoes at the low end is labor and at the high end is image.

No, but I'm going to filter everthing that you write through the awareness that you think that we need to conserve cowskin against future need. And if enough others do that you become a laughingstock.
That is one of the funniest things I've read in a while though. Ranks right up there with "never give your phone number to anybody who calls you on the phone".

--
--John
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote:

I've seen "news" interviews with folks around my area and have witnessed the same comments. Asked if the prices will impact their Memorial weekend activities, they said something on the order of, "No. Whatever the price I'll pay it." I couldn't believe what I was hearing. The prices have risen about 30% and they are definitely having an impact on my wallet and activities.
As we all know, there's a saying that things are priced at what the market will bear. Well, if the public accepts $2.25 (our local prices) then that's what we'll be charged. There's little to no competition in gasoline sales any longer - most are owned by just a couple large corps that control the marketplace. Senator Wyden has done extensive studies on the oil industry and firmly believes they are colluding and manipulating but has had a difficult time pinning them to the wall as the oil industry is stretching and bending the law just enough to avoid legal action. It's pretty clear though they're running their businesses unethically.
Washington and Oregon get a majority of their gasoline from Alaskan crude yet anytime there's a blip on production in other parts of the country or world our prices are driven upward. It's a convenient excuse and the public just keeps on buying.
--
Owen Lowe and his Fly-by-Night Copper Company
Offering a shim for the Porter-Cable 557 type 2 fence design.
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Owen Lowe responds:

I wish it have a slowing affect on mine, but I just turned in the moving truck, which sucked almost $77 worth of gas to go 340 miles. Something well under 10 MPG. Truck is almost new but is a really nasty machine. Plenty of power, but twitchy as hell, tires are out of balance, etc. Not fun to drive.

Lowest price around here is $1.71.9, but it ranges up to $1.89.9.

price of oil at the wellhead rises, weeks in advance of any of that oil being refined and sent out to stations. Another source of astonishment has been the fact that for a couple decades, there has a refinery fire or pipeline problems that cut the oil flow just at the height of the season, resulting in a jump in prices.
Oil companies saying they're doing nothing wrong is about like local TV stations claiming they don't turn the sound up during commercials.
Charlie Self "If you want to know what God thinks of money, just look at the people he gave it to." Dorothy Parker
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Do you price your materials at your acquisition cost or replacement cost?
Don't worry too much about refinery problems, we haven't added any in the US in years - dirty and stinky, you know.

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When I'm selling, I like LIFO.
When I'm buying, I like FIFO.
Regards, Tom.
Thomas J.Watson - Cabinetmaker (ret.) tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (real email) http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1
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On 17 Jun 2004 21:45:26 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote:

I paid $2.08 this morning, which is down from a high of $2.16 about ten days ago.
It's beautiful having an oil man in the Whitehouse, ain't it.
Regards, Tom.
Thomas J.Watson - Cabinetmaker (ret.) tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (real email) http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1
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Correction, two oil men and one oil women.
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"Tom Watson" writes:

Try SoCal pricing.
Lowest price is about $2.19 which is a drop of about $0.08 from last week for self serve.
Personally, I'd like to see it hit about $7-$8/gal.
Bet that would be a little motivation to get serious about weaning the US from foreign oil dependence.
An oil man in the White House?
Yep, let's see how much longer the will try to hide behind WMD.
It has always been about the control the oil baby. Still is.
Lew
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On Fri, 18 Jun 2004 01:53:48 GMT, "Lew Hodgett"
remove ns from my header address to reply via email

Well Oz pays up to $5/gallon........ah! hang on.....6 pint gallon...say $3.50/gallon
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How much of that is tax? It sure sounds like a regressive way to colllect money.
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Does anyone recall that the "oil man" ran against a guy who thought the best way to promote conservation was to tax gasoline to that level? Even wrote in a book about it. Funny thing about those forced conservationists is they expect other people to do the tough work, like find some other way for the suburbanites to get to work, the goods to market, and redistribute the wealth gained from such taxes to minimize the effect on "the poor" and reward the deserving, normally defined as those most likely to vote for the politician. Of course to those who work for a living, there appears to be little difference between $3/gal gasoline price created by taxes or shortages. Except, of course, the warm feeling you get knowing that you've helped conserve for the children.
I've got a 35 mile drive to the grocery store, so I go once a week and make the round of stores just like the old farmers. I'll be on the road by nine today.

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I dunno why it would surprise you. It *is* simple business economics. The principle is 'pricing current inventory at _replacement_ cost'.
If you _don't_ do that (but continue to price at 'acquisition cost'), then, in a period of rising prices, you have to come up with, from 'somewhere', the _additional_capital_investment_ necessary to maintain your inventory.
That means that the debt-service burden increases. And that one then has to raise prices to cover both the increased cost of inventory, _and_ something to defray the additional debt-service cost.
Basically, it's a choice between raising prices 'some now', or 'more later'.

Note: those are, _by_no_means_, the only times that those kind of problems occur.
Such events _do_ tend to be somewhat more frequent at 'peak demand' times, and at those times, the impact _is_ larger than at non-peak times.
Additionally, the off-peak events do not get the general press notice that ones occurring during peak times do. They don't affect the end-user market to any significant degree, so they're simply not 'newsworthy'. So, the only ones that the public hears about are the ones that affect prices, mostly during the peak season.
There _is_, however, a rational explanation for the 'why' of it, that does not involve any dishonesty/malicious-manipulation by the oil companies.
There simply is *not* a significant amount of 'reserve', or 'excess' capacity in the system. This means that at 'peak' times, _everything_ is being utilized. Including the 'older', and 'temperamental', systems that are more prone to breakdowns. In off-peak times, there _is_ 'excess' capacity, and when 'something' breaks, a 'something else', that had been sitting idle, is available to take over the load -- without adversely affecting overall production. However, at the peaks, there _is_ _no_ "'something else' sitting idle" to fill in, and total output thus suffers.
It's a balancing act, between -having- (and PAYING FOR) 'reserve capacity', which increases the cost _all_ the time, or suffering the 'blips' when something happens during 'peak' times.

News flash: The TV stations do _not_ turn the sound up during the commercials. Commercials 'sound' louder, because the producers of the commercial play games (audio compression) with the sound track, to boost the _average_ audio level, while keeping the peaks at the same level.
'Station' sound levels are always set to keep the _peaks_ under the maximum that the equipment can handle.
[I've got professional experience in both 'station operations' and production of commercials.]
Confirming that that is "what's actually going on" requires nothing more than a cheap oscilloscope, hooked up to the audio output of a TV.
Several TV manufacturers -- Maganavox, for one -- have been making sets for at least 10 years with 'automatic volume control' built in. EVEN on those sets, the commercials 'sound' louder. Because the AVC works on the 'peak' levels, not the 'average'.
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Bob Bonomi writes:

In Parkersburg, listening to WTAP, you do NOT need an oscilloscope. Ears work fine. The sound variations during programs are almost as bad as those during the commercials, but the commercials always err on the up side of the scale.
Possibly, it's the cable company, but I'm inclined to doubt it because those in-program bounces do not occur on other stations.
Charlie Self "If you want to know what God thinks of money, just look at the people he gave it to." Dorothy Parker
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Cable companies _are_ notorious for inserting their own commercials over what was on the feed. It gets really funny, when their time-sync is out of step, and you get a couple of seconds of the 'feed' commercial before the local cut-over.
And _most_ are operated so far 'on the cheap' that they can't be bothered to balance the signal levels (audio _or_ video) between the different feeds. when things are 'done right', you should *not* have to adjust the picture or the audio, just because you change cable channels. As they say, "so much for the theory."
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