Triton TRC 001 Router

Page 2 of 3  


You're soldering 0201s? I can't even see the damn things. Thank god for the ladies in the lab with good eyesight and steady hands...
John
(who remembers when 1206 was considered small...)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 26 Sep 2015 14:14:14 +0000 (UTC), John McCoy

John that is why they make mlcroscopes.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

These are amazing tools:
http://www.visioneng.com/products/stereo-microscopes/mantis-elite-3d-eyepieceless-inspection-microscope
You can move your head around and actually see around components. They're much easier on the eyes than traditional microscopes.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 26 Sep 2015 14:14:14 +0000 (UTC), John McCoy

1005s (Metric) are 0402s (Imperial) are our "standard" parts but we do use some 0201s (0603 metric), as well. I've seen 01005s (1/4 again as big) but haven't used them (don't sneeze!). The 0201s are generally used as decoupling capacitors so rarely have to be touched.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Interesting. I don't think we have any 0201 caps, our 0201 parts are all resistors. I wish they were all 0402.
And we have 05001s too, but not on any of the stuff I work on. Thankfully!
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 27 Sep 2015 13:43:12 +0000 (UTC), John McCoy

0201s fit between BGA pads to keep the caps close to the pins they're decoupling (minimize inductance). For reliability reasons, they're not allowed for any other purpose. 0402 is the minimum size, and everything tends to the smallest possible (cost and space).

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 25 Sep 2015 22:33:58 -0500

interestingly it is much simpler now a gopro with all ths shop lights on

you said it was sealed in dark resin so yes it is potted i guess for stability and for harsh environment

they are very nice no temperature to set turn it on and go

there is the angle right there videos by someone that actually really makes stuff

do like paul sellers does employs his son to shoot the video you could be a job creator a popular channel on youtube can be very significant
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/26/2015 11:29 AM, Electric Comet wrote:

The New Texan Workshop and a star on the Hollywood walk of fame. I might be getting ahead of myself. ;~)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 26 Sep 2015 12:13:45 -0500

yeah but what i meant originally is that a popular channel on youtube can mean significant income some quit their day jobs
so if you found the right person it could be worth their time too you do the woodwork someone else does the video
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Leon" wrote:

------------------------------------------------------------------------- A few years ago that big Milwaukee was on top of the heap.
Not sure where things are today.
An electronics swap out would be most desireable if you can figure out a way to do it.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/25/2015 5:01 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

I was quoted $78. for the part, shipped, so that is what I am going to go with if the situation persists.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/25/2015 10:46 AM, Leon wrote:

So before you do that. Take it apart and blow out the switches.
Are you using a DC connected to the cabinet? if you are this could be the problem. Most all routers blow from the head to the bit to cool. When you do a Norm type table you are killing the router. A) it overheats as you are starving it of air B) you overpower the fan and pull the dust through the motor to the switch... I had gone through a number of switches before I finally wised up. No more problems.
If you clean out the switch use some contact cleaner after blowing it out. An on off switch is easier to clean than the speed control, but try it anyway.
--
Jeff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/25/2015 3:26 PM, woodchucker wrote:

I opened the top, where the speed controller is located and found a pretty clean environment. I suspected that it was heating up from dust build up. BUT it goes full speed immediately some times after sitting long enough to totally cool off. Anyway, here is what it looks like and there is really nowhere dust will collect. http://www.toolsparesonline.com/products/7828-speed-controller-110v.aspx
BUT I think I will spray cleaner on it as you mentioned just in case something I can't see is in there. Thank you
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/25/2015 4:59 PM, Leon wrote:

So underneath the dial is the pot. Take the dial off, see if there is a dust shield over the pot. if there is remove it and blow it out. Then spray contact cleaner. My two cents.
--
Jeff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/25/2015 4:12 PM, woodchucker wrote:

Ok, did that, the dial came off, then a small plastic dust shield and some copper fingers. Totally clean inside but I gave it a shot of electrical cleaner and blew it dry. Reassembled and within about 3 seconds it was a runaway motor again. BUT I turned it off and unplugged it, repluged it in and it immediately went to full speed again but after a few seconds it slowed down and worked normally. Oddly it seems to work correctly after it warms up.
We'll see. Thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Very characteristic of a capacitor failing.
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Friday, September 25, 2015 at 9:47:00 AM UTC-5, Leon wrote:


You know, I don't know what I would do if I had an eleven year old tool tha t needed repair. I would think I would be figuring out how many road miles it had on it before I would repair it. Eleven years in _your_ shop seems like a really long run. But if I liked the tool and its results, I could b e pretty forgiving, in this case if the bearings and brushes were still goo d.
Many years ago I needed to cut some door panels and make a bunch of trim fo r a really neat custom job I landed. I looked at a lot of routers and at t hat time the big Porter Cable was still around. But the build quality had fallen so much those that had the newer ones steered me away. I seem to re member screeching bearings for some reason, although that may be wrong.
So that left Hitachi, Milwaukee and DeWalt. Don't remember why I passed th e Hitachi. Didn't like the fit/finish of the Milwaukee, nor the fact that the soft start wasn't very soft at all. IIRC, it is now made in China and w ith a few manufacturing changes is a good router.
http://goo.gl/65ZlAt
I HATE those damn handles, and under a table they take up a lot of room. A lso, upside down, this machine is a nightmare to adjust. To me, this tool was made to be a lightweight shaper that never left the table. Also, from time to time I still use 1/4" shank bits, and a 1/4" collet does not come w ith this machine. It is another $40-$50.
So down to the DeWalt. Not always crazy about their tools, and haven't alw ays had great luck with them lasting. However, when I got this machine hom e, it was love when I switched it on. Really nice soft start, not nearly a s loud as the Milwaukee or the Porter Cable. This one came with the 1/4" c ollet in the box.
http://goo.gl/28zZBr
It has plenty of power, doesn't require a suitcase sized table (this is ver y similar in size to the Triton) and is extremely well made. It is made in Italy by Elu from Italian and Swiss parts. The electronic speed control h as been flawless. Under the table it is a breeze to adjust since I bought one of these
http://www.toolnut.com/DeWalt_DW6966_Fine_Depth_Adjuster_p/dw6966.htm
for it. Some of the guys online that showed me their setups made nice adju sters with a piece of pipe, a coupler nut and turned a nice looking wood kn ob for the same purpose. When I found that for $15 at the time I purchased it, it was a no brainer.
I don't know your setup for raising panels, but I am honestly afraid of the horizontally spinning router bits that should be in a shaper. There was a guy here locally that was using CMT bits to raise his panels and the bit b roke and nicked him and half of the head lodged in the garage wall. At the time I was also on Sawmill Creek, and although quite rare, a couple of fel lows had the same result. Even figuring in that at least one wasn't using the setup correctly, I am thinking about a bit going in a machine that in u se just doesn't look safe to me.
I put the panels on edge and cut away as much as possible on a table saw. Then I use a vertical panel raising bit to make my cuts. The vertical bits cut a bit slower than the horizontally mounted since you don't have the mo mentum behind that develops behind that large horizontal head, but the fini sh is fine. I never have made a lot of doors and now rarely do. The route r has plenty of power for dadoes, edging, and making passes with odd bits t o make some "one off" shop designed trims. It can profile cut ton of trim without overheating, and creates enough air flow around it even in the clos ed box I made that it doesn't overheat. This router has been a really solid performer and a joy for me to use. It has left the table from time to tim e to edge or trim something as needed and it is easy to hold, aim and use.
The only knock I have heard (but not found to be a problem for me) is that it doesn't plunge as deeply as some of the other routers in its class. I g ot rid of the base that came on it and made a really large phenolic base, a nd even after losing the thickness of the base, I still have no problems. If I did, I would probably buy a bit extender and be done with it, but at t his point no problems. I think this is one DeWalt got right.
Robert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/26/2015 3:17 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 9/26/2015 3:17 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Actually that tool does not see nearly as much action as the previous router. I use it mostly to round over edges, 1/8" radius. And raised panels, the occasional wood top edge treatment ans so on.
I really like the tool, I have not wanted for another feature to be on the machine.

Current reputation is what would cause me any concern on the Speedmatic

The handles are kinda weird but I would probably remove them for hanging under the table. I probably would never use it anywhere else. I have a huge Bosch plunge router used to be in the table but what a beast to adjust, even with the various add on to make it easier to use. FWIW the Triton only came with the half inch collet but came with a multi segmented 1/4" adapter that has worked surprisingly well.
When I took the end cap off to view the innards I was almost in disbelief that the insides were so clean. About the only thing that had a layer of dust, and a very thin one at that, were the wires. Hardly anything anywhere else. I will say that the air flow through the router is pretty strong.

Humm. I'll keep that one in mind should I need to go that route.

With the Triton I can turn the speed way down and seriously I have no issue with the horizontal bits. It cuts lit butt'a and is a relatively quiet operation. I do however spin the better quality bits when doing raised panels and I keep the bit covered with the fence so I am only seeing about 1/4 exposure of the bit. And I typically make 3~4 passes, just taking a little out at a time.

What wold turn me off on any router would to not be able to change the bit from above the table. BUT I'll keep an eye on the DeWalt.
Thank you Robert!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Saturday, September 26, 2015 at 8:21:41 AM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

I have been online looking at the Triton routers this morning and there sur e seems to be a lot to commend that machine. When I bought my DeWalt, ther e was no Triton here in the USA, maybe somewhere but Woodcraft introduced t hem locally after I had purchased my machine. Then I recall there was a "b ad batch" that ticked off my contact there, but that was many, many years a go.
Seems they have it all together, now. Read a lot of glowing reviews on the Triton's power, a bit difficult for some but really accurate adjustments a nd its reliability. Leon, am I reading this right about this router that y ou can crank the height adjustment from the bottom of the router so that wh en it is in a table you can use a wrench and adjust it from above? That wo uld be a pretty nifty feature!
Robert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.