Trip to auction today

I went to the auction today and found some older Wrecker stuff (finally...). If you like old iron, then you can take a look if you want. I'm not trying to compete with Rob, but I also put up two unidentified tools! : ) Below is a link to my website:
http://web.newsguy.com/MySite /
Bill
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Nice grab, Bill. That last one is a Japanese shaping rasp. Nice!
Very nice t-bevel and sweet spokies. Any good rasps and files in that large batch?
P.S: You might take a look at the manual for that camera before the next photo shoot, eh? ;)
-- Experience is a good teacher, but she send in terrific bills. -- Minna Thomas Antrim
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Larry Jaques wrote:

Yeah, the whole thing between the wife and the camera, and its 3 batteries, and none of them being charged, and me not knowing how to use her camera (evidently), because she gave me the wrong directions, because after I was done with the first photo-shoot I only had 1 picture... I was lucky to get home with the tools in the first place : ) In fact, the way I heard it, the feller said having been born on the last day of the last month in the last hour in the last minute at the last second. the feller said he was lucky to even have been born at all!
Larry, thanks for the allusion to the Japanese rasps, that surprised me.
What I thought was one of the nicest rasps, was a 14" Heller (Farrier Rasp). It looks like a quality tool..probably would be very aggressive on wood. Anybody already know the verdict regarding that?
As you've mentioned, Larry, there are a lot of rasps (even more than in the pictures). I'll try to take decent picture of two of the interesting ones tomorrow. And I'll remember to use the flash the whole time! :)
Bill
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I'd seen them at the Japan Woodworker. http://fwd4.me/pb7

Methinks you'll be correct that it's too(?) aggressive. I just happened to be looking at rasps this morning and found this cool concept. I have no idea if it came to fruition, but they're only ten bucks, so I'll be at HF this weekend... I think a #49 is in my future, in any case.
This little guy works well when I need to shape something in the field: http://fwd4.me/pbO

What did the lot cost you? If there's even one Nicholson #49 or #50, the trip was worth it. Ditto the Jap rasp, from what I've heard.
-- Experience is a good teacher, but she send in terrific bills. -- Minna Thomas Antrim
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Larry Jaques wrote:

There were a couple of those in the bucket too, and a typical longer one with convex and flat blades. Another one is about 5 inches long and you can hold it your hand like a block plane. Also a cylindrical rasp. I'll have to be more vigilant looking for things that need rasping! : )

There was no #49 or #50, but someone talked me into buying those a few years ago--I mean I got them for Christmas! : ) My intent is to rasp necks for musical instruments someday. The trip cost me $76, plus the non-pecuniary cost of checking the inventory in person almost every week--and it was a dry summer. I got "hooked" last summer when I found Stanley planes 3 weeks in a row. Since then I have figured out that the auction site is "smart" enough to spread similar merchandise across several of their weekly auctions (so, most likely, all of those planes came from the same source). Similarly, the auction worker who was pulling things out of the bucket for individual bidding raised my purchase price compared to if they had initially opened the bidding on the whole bucket. I had intended to come home with the bucket though and I did. I set rationality aside for 5 minutes.
The "whole experience" is part of my learning and my fun. If one's time is worth much more than $10/hr, he or she might as well order directly from the Lie-Nelson catalog! On the other hand, this way, instead of seeing tools, one sees lives, and one can share a tool's possession with those who owned them before you. Yes, it's sort of spiritual.
Bill
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Cool.
A bit higher than I thought, but I'm a cheapskate.

Ayup. Whatever raises their bottom line.

So what portion of the total price did the pristine bucket come to? ;)

You betcha!
LJ--Another Proud Galoot.
P.S: Did you get your Galoot banner from Spokie's site yet? Nab it off mine if you can't find it elsewhere. (Egad, I haven't updated my websites in years. I think it's about time.)
-- Education should provide the tools for a widening and deepening of life, for increased appreciation of all one sees or experiences. It should equip a person to live life well, to understand what is happening around him, fo to live life well one must live life with awareness. -- Louis L'Amour
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On 2010-11-25 10:29:30 -0500, Larry Jaques

Rockler carries 'em, too.
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I have been looking for a bucket like that for a long time. <G>
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The Stanley 80 is a cabinet scraper, and can save you a lot of sanding time once you learn to sharpen it. I have what appears to be the same Craftsman LA block plane. Cuts good, feels good in the hand, and I like the unusual lateral adjustment. Tune it and give it a good test drive before you decide to sell it. I kept mine.
If the #5 is a T16 check the underside of the cutter. The originals were usually stamped with the quarter and year it was made. So if it has 3/39 on it, the cutter was made Jul-Aug-Sep 1939. Cool, huh?
Please post a better picture of the bucket.
Regards, Roy
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Roy wrote:

I like the way it feels too--just the way it should. I'm pretty sure there is supposed to be a knob on the adjustment screw which this one is missing, but this is a non-issue from a usability perspective since it can be turned easily enough without one. That being said, where might I locate a replacement knob? I suppose just about any small knurled metal knob that fit would do. I guess I'll check my local hardware store.
Newbe question: How well does a low-angle block plane serve as a stand-in for an ordinary block plane? My intuition tells me this substitution may lead to greater "tear-out". Is this the correct way to think about it?
Bill
Tune it and give it a good test drive before you decide to sell it.

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Mine is the same way. I don't know if it was made that way, or there was (probably) some plastic molded onto the hub and it is long since broken off.

There is more risk of tearout with a LA, but if you closed down the mouth real tight, you cut down on that risk. Take a very fine cut if necessary. I don't see a throat adjusting lever on the front knob of your plane, but it may be the picture. If it is not there, double check to make sure the mouth is adjustable.
The LA is a tool more suited for use on end grain. You can make it work on long grain, but your always run the risk of more tearout. You need a standard angle block plane (or three) in your stable if you don't have one. Tell SWMBO I said you need to buy a good one (or three).
Regards, Roy
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Roy wrote: I don't

Mine is supposed to be "adjustable". Under the (front) handle sets something resembling a wing-nut with "crescent moon" protruding from the bottom. It's apparent purpose is, with rotation, to adjust the front throat. However, the throat piece does not budge much today. I won't try to force it (more than the .02" I just did) until I've cleaned it up. After appropriate lubrication (WD-40?), I will probably tap on it, from the end of the sole, in a manner which will avoid damaging it. The mouth is sharp even without the blade. I'll disassemble the pieces before I try again.

Thanks for sharing your insight Roy.
Bill

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Nice haul! Too bad about the sales tax :)
Don't often see a 78 with the fence, never mind the depth stop, throw in the spur and you got the whole kit! (Well, I don't.) Got two, one Canadian, and need both for the whole kit.
--
If your name is No, I voted for you - more than once ...


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Very nice haul. You suck!
The unknown device above the Jap rasp is a file guide for sharpening handsaws The round disk should slide freely along the rod. The slot on it is adjustable for setting the angle for rip vs crosscut saws. A triangular file clamps onto the arms attached to the ends of the rod. Art
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Artemus wrote:

Artemus, Thank you for your explanation. The round disk does slide freely along the rod, but the angle of teh slot did not appear adjustable (at least not easily adjustable). The corrosion may have something to do with that. There just happened to be some triangular files in the bucket, so I'll investigate further!
Thanks, Bill
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