tree removal arrangement

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On Wednesday, May 11, 2016 at 5:22:37 PM UTC-5, krw wrote:

LOL.
Been away, just catching up on threads...
Another situation: Around here, a leaning rotten/dead tree (proven threat) can be mandated to be taken down... the owner has no say so. If the owne r doesn't comply, the city will do it and charge the owner. Not sure how o ne proves it to be a threat, but I suppose there are parameters (and multip le pro opinions) for determining.
Sonny
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On Mon, 9 May 2016 21:49:26 -0400

sounds like challenging work
i have seen them cut trees like this in sections starting at the top and lowering with ropes
after limbing them
your method sounds safer because cutting in sections requires careful roping and using a chainsaw 60 feet up

is the ash usable lumber or firewood
you make another interesting point
can a tree on adjoining property be labeled a hazard to another property and be required to be removed
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Electric Comet wrote:

No. For the most part. There are locations around the country though where weird local regulations defy logic... As a rule, but not as a definitive, if the tree is right on the property line, there are some prevailing regulations that affect that tree. Situation dependent. That said - if a tree is fully on your property, and it leans toward your neighbor's property - not so much protection for your neighbor.
You might have been better off to have checked with your local municipality though, than raising your question here.
--
-Mike-
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In my neighborhood, the insurance companies are very proactive. If there is a tree that is leaning towards your house, you tell your insurance agent about it. They come out and look at it and if they think it is a problem, they write a letter which explains that they will need to pay out if any damage is caused by your tree. And they will sue to recover those damages. That often acts as a good motivator.
I should point out that there are a lot of trees coming to the end of their life in this neighborhood. Trees come down all the time. So there is a lot of proactive tree work done around here. My next door neighbor had a huge maple tree come down in her back yard a few months ago.
Also, there is enough of a tree problem around here that many real estate sales include a "tree threat analysis" from a qualified arborist. It is a good idea. About four years ago, a big tree took out about a third of a house a block away from me. After any big wind storm, there is branches down everywhere. And some small trees.
I walk my dog every day and I have seen the tree guys at work many times. You really don't want to be liable for a tree on your property falling on somebody else's house.
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On 5/11/2016 12:45 PM, Lee Michaels wrote:

Snip

Exactly and precisely why I have liability insurance on my homeowners policy.
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wrote:

...and a $1M umbrella.
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On Wednesday, May 11, 2016 at 1:45:08 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@googlegroups.com wrote:
...snip...

The house next to mine is a rental. A few years back a large limb from a tree on that lot came down on my house. Minimal damage to my property, but a lot of clean-up. Before I called my insurance company, I called the landlord, just to let him know what had happened and that I was calling my ins co. He said OK and seemed fine with it at the time.
Well, apparently, my ins co called his ins co and told them that the tree was a risk. If there was another claim, my ins co was going to go after his ins co for payment. His ins co then contacted him telling him that he should do something about the tree because they may not be willing to pay on any future claim related to damage caused by the tree - either on his property or any other.
So he comes knocking on *my* door, pissing and moaning that I blew him in to his ins co and asking why didn't I handle it "like a man." I calmly reminded him that he was the first one that I called when it happened, that I told him that I was going to call my ins co and that he had said OK. Anything that happened after that was between the ins co's and that I had not contacted his carrier. "I don't even know who your ins co is." I also calmly told him that he could be damn sure that I wouldn't be calling him first if there was another incident with that tree. I'm pretty sure he left even more pissed than when he showed up.
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On 5/12/2016 1:47 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Good on'Ya!
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On 5/11/2016 1:45 PM, Lee Michaels wrote:

I'd tell them to contact my insurance provider. Hopefully the same guys:-) Perhaps they could agree to pay a few bucks to have the thing trimmed or removed, rather than a lot of bucks later to replace a roof or more.
I had a friend killed by a branch falling out of his tree as he walked up the sidewalk. Another friends daughter has a metal plate in her head as a branch fell on her head when she was around 2 years old.
As for government, I was watching This Old House once, and in Boston, they were not permitted to remove a dead/almost dead tree without government permission, and they had to plant an equivalent tree some where before they could get the permit.
Wow, talk about control freaks...
--
Jack
Got Change: Individual Freedom =======> Government Control!
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On Monday, May 23, 2016 at 4:07:39 PM UTC-4, Jack wrote:

Jack, Our experience is that insurance companies used to be pro-active, and with foresight. Now, if you make them aware of a potential problem, and don't take care of it, they may choose to ignore your claim...
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On 5/23/2016 4:45 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Last year my daughter's sewer backed up in her basement. They called a plumber and he said they have a "flat spot" in the basement pipe and to fix it right, they would need to dig up the cement floor. Would cost around $5G's. The plumber told her there was an excellent chance her insurance company would cover most, if not all of it. I told her plumbers are notorious liars and I've heard the flat spot garbage several time before, and, I'd doubt the insurance company (Erie) would cover it unless she had some kind of special coverage. Well, not only did Erie cover most of it, they covered all of it less deductible, and I think it was $7G's. They told her it was cheaper than paying for repeated sewerage damage.
I was of course shocked and amazed.
--
Jack
Add Life to your Days not Days to your Life.
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That's not unusual. Atlanta has the same restrictions. You can't remove a tree from your property without an arborist's sign-off and city permit. Of course the arborist will want to try to save the tree, if at all possible. That's what they do.
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On Monday, May 23, 2016 at 4:07:39 PM UTC-4, Jack wrote:

Even after a large limb from the very old tree on the rental property next door fell on my house and my Ins Co had to pay for clean up (and some very minor damage) they would not be pro-active and pay to remove any of the weak-looking branches still hanging over my house. I asked, they said no.
The only thing they did was write a letter to the landlord and his ins co warning them that if the tree caused any more damage to my property, they would go after his ins co for the cost of claim. They would rather hope that nothing happens and if it does, hope that the other ins co pays, than spent a few hundred bucks to prevent the possibility of a claim in the first place.

I was in a neighbor's yard with my 2(?) year old a long time ago (he's 28 now). He was on the neighbor's swing set in one of those bucket swings, the kind that it is difficult to get a young child out off. My neighbor's kid was in the raised fort attached to the swing set. It was a beautiful sunny summer day.
Lunchtime came around, so I wrestled my kid out of the swing while my neighbor climbed up into the fort and retrieved his kid. We were in the house for less than 5 minutes when a huge limb from a tree in the next yard let go with a loud crack and landed on the swing set. It landed "lengthwise", completely crushing the swing section and the fort. The swing my son was in was barely visible as it lay on the ground under the main part of the branch.
There is no way we would have gotten either kid out of the swing/fort before the branch came down. There was no warning. It was crack...crush.
The wive's were crying and hugging the kids. I gotta admit, both my friend and I got teary eyed too. That was close.
...snip...
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"Electric Comet" wrote in message wrote: >> BTW, I used the Stihl MS461 with 25" bar that I picked up around the

I plan to mill it with a chainsaw mill... 36" bar on the MS461 gives me about 29" of cutting capacity taking the Alaskan mill attachment and roller nose on the bar into account. I might need to trim a few boards to width though I think if I remove the bark that will take care of the issues on the butt end of the first log. Taking the bark off also will keep the chain sharp longer as there is a lot of grit in bark.

Around here if you notify the owner in writing that there is a problem and something happens they are liable...
The note about having the insurance company do this is not a bad idea.
My parent's agent lives behind them near the property where all the dead ash threaten my parents' property. As such it would be easy for him to check it out. ;~)
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On Wed, 11 May 2016 17:11:25 -0400

sounds like you will have a nice stockpile of ash to use in about a year
i have turned some spindles of ash but that is about the extent of my experience with it
it was really nice to turn

interesting there must be more to it than just sending an opinion in a letter in your case it sounds like you are qualified to pass judgement on the tree
this could be abused by nasty people
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"Electric Comet" wrote in message wrote: >sounds like you will have a nice stockpile of ash to use in about a

Probably sooner as the tree was dead and was drying out already...

A few photographs will easily show the lean and proximity of the ash trees to the shed and the property line. I've had to clean up the tops and branches of some of the neighbor's maple trees already--they died due to wet feet--that fell in an area where there was nothing to damage. Some of those dead maple trees however can reach the garage if they came down in whole. The landowner isn't adverse to cutting trees as he cleared a fairly large area for a horse pasture... whether he is a responsible neighbor is yet to be determined!
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On Wed, 11 May 2016 08:43:42 -0700, Electric Comet

If you get the ash on time it can make good lumber. Longstanding deadwood is generally firewood.
As far as hazards go, if you feel a tree is a hazard to your property, send a registered letter to the neighbour, his insurance company, and yours indicating your concern and a reasonable explabnation of the risk. Not a bad idea to mail yourself a copy as well and put it in your safe. When the tree comes down and does damage because no-one took action, forwaerd your copy to your lawyer and let the insurance companies fight it out..All the layer needs to do, (or your insurance company) is establish that not removing the risk was negligence and that both the owner and their insurance company were fully aware of the risk. Having an arborist's assessment of the tree and pictures included in the registered letter wpuld not be a bad idea either.....
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On Thursday, April 28, 2016 at 2:54:42 PM UTC-5, Electric Comet wrote:

As best I can determine, you are not a professional. You are a hobbyist, maybe? .... *We've never seen any of your woodwork. You don't have a clue, as to what you are contemplating "leaning" into, if you are actually conte mplating such.
You seem to post about such a wide variety of stuff and there doesn't alway s seem to be a common thread connecting all the different things you post a bout.

Is that your first thoughts, the bottom line or end product. i.e., profit? Typical thinking for a failed venture: Though you appear to be consider ing the "work involved", your comments suggest a round-about way of looking at the end product (profit), without considering all that precedes it, req uired to accomplish it. I get a sense that your business planning/thinkin g is about as valid (meaning erratic) as your varied woodworking postings.
For a property owner who has significant timber on their property, they won 't be advertising on Craigslist, period!! They will go directly to a dedi cated lumber/milling company. For this 50-100 trees, I highly suspect it' s scrub stock or firewood, at best, and the property owner is looking for s omeone unknowing, of such things. Or did you make up this story, about th ese 50-100 trees, simply for the purpose of posting something (again), here on the forum?
I'll bite, though:
I suggest, if you want some (hobbyist) lumber for yourself, to inquire abou t cutting 1 or 2 trees, only. Size up that job (and the milling, etc.), b efore you even remotely consider tackling an acre of (questionable?!) timbe r land.
BTW, for that property owner, who advertises on Craigslist, .... and as oth ers, here, have proffered...., I would recommend you Google "Hold Harmless Agreement", even for collecting 1 or 2 trees.
As a hobbyist, I once cut down 5-6 trees, at one time, for lumber, long ago . The lumber value wasn't worth the labor effort. The pleasure of getting it was the value, at my naive age and/or lack of intelligence of such thin gs. Since then, I've always salvaged a downed tree, or one that was to be fell by someone else, then had it milled. For a hobbyist, lumberjacking is a big job and the "profit" (of 1 or 2 trees) is usually only in the plea sure of getting a particular tree/lumber, not necessarily the monetary prof it of the lumber.
Scenario: Let's say you cut all those trees and have them milled (rough cu t). Then what? Where you gonna store all that lumber, before you sell it ? .... *I assume you gonna sell it? Kiln dried, air dried? Is it to be planed or will you sell it as rough cut? Then you have to find some buyers , and that's another whole new ball game!
Side note: Generally, anything 8" (sometimes 10") or less, in diameter, is not milled, is not worth milling, for lumber. By the time the log is squa red, there's no significant amount of "beam" remaining, to cut a decent amo unt of lumber.
If you want some hobbyist lumber, for a cost of labor only, I would recomme nd you find an old house, barn or shed to salvage, rather than lumberjackin g. .... and again, consider a Hold Harmless agreement for demolition. Mo re often, the property owner pays to have a structure demolished.
Want to find an old house to demolish? Go to your city's code office/appro priate department and find out what old houses are listed as condemned, man dated to be demolished. Go inspect the properties, to see which ones have some good/desireable lumber. Quote the owner a fee for demolition. You' ll likely need a contract, as to what all needs to be done to satisfy the c ity's ordinace and/or the owners' wishes. For condemned houses, the city will often give the owner a time limit to have the building demolished, or else the city will do it, at the owner's expense. The city's demolition fe e is usually non-negotiable. What's the city's typical fees, for various s tructures, and use that as a guide for your quote.
Not familiar with Hold Harmless agreements? Go to the Court house (files) and find one/some... see what is entailed, how it's worded, etc., etc.
Sonny
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