Treated lumber

Will treated lumber accept and hold a redwood stain or is the treatment something that rejects such? I'm toying with the idea of using it for a small yard shelter (can't remember the proper name for such) and want it to match my redwood stained cedar fence.
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John DeBoo wrote:

The CCA trellis I stained two years ago looks like I stained it yesterday. Let the wood dry first to help the stain penetrate.
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Gosh, my deck holds it's stain pretty well. You using a deck stain or something that was left out of the question?
wes
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Yes... but paint and stain work better if you let the wood dry out first. Unfortunately the wood usually warps as it dries. Try to get the driest PT wood that you can when you purchase. Most of the PT wood I see is still very wet from the process.

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wrote:

It will if it is dry. One problem with PT wood is that it is saturated with the nasty liquid preservatives. I have used it but I hate it. I'd use cypress, cedar, redwood, or white oak, even at 3X the cost.
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