Treated decking - warping

I have a 20x30 foot deck that has some 5/4 6" treated pine(I think it's pine) decking that is starting to cup and warp... I'm getting a few half inch gaps now between the boards...it's only been a few years.
I didn't put it down, and it looks like an amature job for sure.... they never even put any sealer on the wood! The only way I can think of to fix this is to pull all the boards off, run them through a $200 ryobi (home depot special) surface planer, then put them back. Would this be a good option, or am I going to have to scrap the whole deal and start over from the joists up?
I'm also planning on expanding this deck too, as the railing is kinda loose and falling off anyhow. Again, i did not put this together. I'm just trying to see if I can salvage the $1000 or so of wood.
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" snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com" wrote:

Planing them will just give you thickness variations and the cost of the planer and your labor negates any potential savings anyway. Just plan on redoing the job properly and consider one of the many composite decking materials available since they are stable and maintenance (sealing) free.
Perhaps you can recycle the old deck materials to make a trellis on a section of fence to back some bushes.
Pete C.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote: > I have a 20x30 foot deck that has some 5/4 6" treated pine(I think it's > pine) decking that is starting to cup and warp... I'm getting a few > half inch gaps now between the boards...it's only been a few years. > > I didn't put it down, and it looks like an amature job for sure.... <snip>
When it comes to repair, you can't get there from here.
Try to find another use for the lumber you remove.
Lew
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What you've got here is an opportunity. You can put a composite decking material such as Trex down right over your warped and cupped boards. You can use a thinner composite because it will be well supported.
DonkeyHody "If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail." - Abraham Maslow
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*Amen* to all that replied. The treated pine you buy is right out if the vat. Green as hell when it goes in, it takes pressure and heat to get the preservatives pushed into the grain. I used to get that stuff so wet and green that it would shoot moisture out when you would cut it with a skillsaw.
And as for the problems you are having, that is the very reason I no longer build decks as part of my company offerings. The clients didn't like the end product a year later, and neither did I. No amount of sealing, prep, or any other gyrations will make that stuff a suitable product.
I have some stickered in my back yard against the fence, and most if it has been back there for a year or two. It has done all the shrinking and twisting it will do. I use this stuff for repairs on decks just like you have.
Robert
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

was before the new non poisonous stuff came out. I could only find it at the high end store in town and the price was up there too. A quick search using "kiln dried pressure treated lumber" gave 81 results but no manufacturers names jumped out at me, mostly people selling items made with it. Call the most expensive lumber dealer in your area and ask while you're sitting down. Joe
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On Thu, 30 Nov 2006 12:10:07 -0500, Joe Gorman wrote:

Wonder how the price compares to ipe.
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--John
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That varies a lot depending on the local area.
KDPT is a rare commodity in many areas, as is Ipe.
In my area, we have plenty of IPE at $1.80lf while a 12' syp pt is $5.25.
The KD of PT version does not exist locally.
J. Clarke wrote:

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Pat Barber wrote:

I just called and got prices Ipe 1 x 6 eased edged 10' $40.19 KDPT 6/4 x6 eased 10' $14.14 Joe
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On Fri, 01 Dec 2006 11:37:43 -0500, Joe Gorman wrote:

<http://www.ipedepot.com will sell you 1x6 ipe for $1.85/lineal foot(plus shipping of course--adds a lot on small orders, not so much on big ones). The local yard will sell me 4/4 cabinet grade KD ipe S3S for the price you were quoted.

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I think you see what I am talking about...
He sounds high on the Ipe but if they really have KDPT, that's a no brainer.
The KDPT generally runs "about" 30-50% higher than standard. If these guys are the only game in town, they know what they got.
Joe Gorman wrote:

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IMHO treated lumber should only be used for the structure of the deck. The decking/balustrade should be Redwood, Cedar, Ipe, Mahogany, (etc) or a composite. Although I have built numerous treated decks in the past, the customer is given full warning as to what will happen (warping, splitting etc) to the treated decking, 5/4 in particular, as it dries out. In any case, if you must use the treated decking butt the wet boards together. In due time they will shrink and leave a gap sufficient for water runoff. Fasten it with screws, 2 per joist about 3/4" in from the edge to help prevent cupping. Also, when I have built a treated deck it was left unfinished. The lumber is way to wet to put a finish on at first, and, depending where you live, could take months to dry out enough to put a finish on. Hence sealing has be left entirely to the homeowner. I'd just remove the old treated decking and replace with a proper decking material provided the structure is sound. --dave

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