Transfering designs to wood

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I am sure this has been discussed many times before but please humour me. What is the best way to get a design from a computer onto wood for the purpose of pyrography, cutting with a scroll saw or carving? Gary
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"Gary Dean" writes:

Print out the drawing, then glue down with rubber cement, then cut out pieces, then rub off pattern and rubber cement.
HTH
--
Lew

S/A: Challenge, The Bullet Proof Boat, (Under Construction in the Southland)
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Flip your drawing on the box to yield a mirror image. Print that on a laser printer, or make a photocopy if you've got inkjet. Put the paper pattern-side down on your stuff and iron it. Kewl.
T'other way is to use carbon paper (under a right-way image) and carefully roll a pricker wheel over the lines. Yuck.
--
"Keep your ass behind you."

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"Australopithecus scobis"
: : > I am sure this has been discussed many times before but please humour : > me. What is the best way to get a design from a computer onto wood for : > the purpose of pyrography, cutting with a scroll saw or carving? : : Flip your drawing on the box to yield a mirror image. Print that on a : laser printer, or make a photocopy if you've got inkjet. Put the paper : pattern-side down on your stuff and iron it.
Has anyone actually got good results from this process?
Jeff G
-- Jeff Gorman, West Yorkshire, UK Email address is username@ISP username is amgron ISP is clara.co.uk Website www.amgron.clara.net
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Many times.
Jim in Milwaukee
Jeff Gorman wrote:

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wrote:

Yes, all the time, needs a hot-ish iron though
Barry Lennox
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"Australopithecus scobis" wrote...

I use carbon paper but I place it under the design and transfer with a pencil. I have no idea what a pricker wheel is but it's probably more money than an HB pencil.
--
Cheers,
Howard
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I used the wrong term. It's called a "pounce wheel." And last time I transferred a pattern, I used a pencil, too. I don't have a pounce wheel either; I just look at them in catalogs... ;-)
--
"Keep your ass behind you."

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A pounce wheel is used to cut small holes in a paper pattern. Then the (usually a sign painter) user "pounces a bag-o-caulk over the holes. The pattern then can be removed revealing a light chalk outline of what to paint.
JOMUF - Just one more useless fact.
Dave
wrote:

money
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i knew a sign painter that had a large metal plate to hang big paper on, he would project the image onto it with an overhead projector, then he used some special rod that had electricity running through it and it would toss a spark between it and the metal plate, leaving a small hole in the paper. it sparked about 10 times per second or so and you traced the outline of what was projected in this manner.
then when you got it to the building you were painting, you would 'pounce' it on.
dont know what that device was called, but it was pretty slick
randy
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He had to use a projector cuz all the live models quit the same day....
--
"Keep your ass behind you."

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if you are going to 'remove the line', you can always tape the original on top and use a push pin to make holes along the lines. sometimes its easier for simple stuff than messing around with gadgets.
randy

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FWIW, Lee Valley has some graphite tracing paper that looks good: http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.asp?page2818&category=1,42936&ccurrency=2&SID I haven't tried it yet, but I bought some with my last order.
I've played around with various methods like enlarging the design, taping it to the wood and using a sharp pencil or knife to outline the design (a ponce wheel would probably work too, but I haven't tried one). They work, but I think the tracing paper might be better.
Chuck Vance
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     snipped-for-privacy@swt.edu (Conan the Librarian) writes:

I've never tried it with wood, but fabric stores sell colored "carbon paper" for transfering patterns onto fabric. It might work well on wood. It comes in different colors and would be as readily available as your nearest fabric store.
Also, it sometimes works best to glue the paper pattern onto the wood when scrollsawing. This can be done with spray adhesive. Didn't Roy Underhill do a show with a marquetry (?) expert who used such a method? (Maybe he used hide glue?)
-- Jeff Thunder Dept. of Mathematical Sciences Northern Illinois Univ. jthunder at math dot niu dot edu
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The rubber cement thing works. Also, you can use spray on contact cement, I think what I use is called Scotch 77. Than to remove, you use a heat gun. And sandpaper.
come to think of it, just use Lew's method.
I've also heard you can use a copy from a laserjet (NOT a paint jet) printer, as an iron on transfer thing. Gives you a reversed outpupt, of course, but I guess what you do is set the copier to make a heavy output, than just use your wife's favorite iron to trasnfer the toner to the wood.
Come to think of it, you better just use Lew's method. Of course, for woodburning, the toner transfer method might work well.
-Dan V.
wrote:

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The 3M Scotch 77 works well, I just used it this last weekend. The important thing is to spray it on the back of the paper only, not the workpiece, and let it dry at least 5 minutes before applying it to the workpiece. Then, don't wait around a week before doing your cutting because it does continue curing. But, not to worry, a card scraper takes the paper and any remaining gunk off very easily.
Doesn't work for woodburning of course. For that the laser printer/photo copier works best if you print on vellum instead of bond.
-- ******** Bill Pounds http://www.billpounds.com
"Dan Valleskey" <valleskey at comcast dot net> wrote in message

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forgot which catalog, but it was with the woodburning section , it is a 1" round heating tool, sorta like a woodburner but round and flat. Copying off a copier that uses black ink, turn pattern upside down, us heat "thing" to trace over pattern, ink comes off on the wood leaving a light shadow of the original. i use this to burn designs but have used straight line items also. Using paper, graphite is the best.
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Tue, Apr 20, 2004, 6:47am (EDT+5) snipped-for-privacy@ntlworld.com (GaryDean) says: I am sure this has been discussed many times before but please humour me. What is the best way to get a design from a computer onto wood for the purpose of pyrography, cutting with a scroll saw or carving? Gary
Myriads, which is why people should check the archives.
The only ways that work consistently for me are, freehand, trace with carbon paper, or, bestest, glue the pattern to the work.
JOAT The Good are Innocent so they invented Justice. The Evil are Guilty so they invented Mercy. - Unknown
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(Gary Dean) says: I am sure this has been discussed many times before but please humour me. What is the best way to get a design from a computer onto wood for the purpose of pyrography, cutting with a scroll saw or carving? Gary The only ways that work consistently for me are, freehand, trace with carbon paper, or, bestest, glue the pattern to the work.
FWIW there are all kinds of 'carbon' paper and some are better than others. I have found the tracing paper that has a blue pigmented wax works best for tracing onto metal and wood. The carbon paper that you used to get between sheets of computer printer forms works good on wood. After tracing onto the wood or metal I will enhance the tracing with a very thin marker(or the thin white out pen that has been suggested). Larry
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Gary Dean wrote:

Not to make the wreck jealous but we have a Laser CAMM at work we use for model building (we're an architectural firm). I've started to use it for various projects and lately have used it to score the wood for pattern cut outs. If the wood is thin enough (1/4" or less) the laser does a good job of cutting it for me, although it does burn the edges, but I think it makes for a cool finish. We received a Christmas tree ornament last year that was laser carved and it was incredible. I couldn't believe I hadn't used the machine at work for it yet.
It's a pretty cool resource to have to use for free.
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