Traditional Woodworking shop

Greetings Everyone,
I have been asked to help build/create a 19th century (1840 to 1890's era) traditional woodshop. I have failed teribly at finding online samples, diagrams, descriptions or layouts of original general purpose traditional woodworkshops online. I am also interested in the tools, benches, and 'machines' that may have been used in that timeframe.
There are, however, certain limitations. I am a blacksmith by hobby, and the tools and 'machines' have to either be made on the blacksmith shop, or bought in some fashion that would demonstrate the age and 'originality' of that item's use in the desired time frame.
Does anyone know where I might get more information on how the shops of old were laid out and equipt?
Thanks
Daniel Curry
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Zylogue wrote:

If you're in driving distance of Hancock, MA (western Mass, not Boston area) or feel like taking a trip Hancock Shaker Village might be a good bet. If you call them and explain what you're working on they may be able to suggest some reference material.

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
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Colonial Williamsburg comes to mind. They are definitely 18th century, but the folks in the woodworking shop could probably give you an idea of the advances in the next 70-90 years. Any chance you are in the mid atlantic?
Montyhp

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"Montyhp" <montyhpatyahoo.com> wrote in message

Likewise for the Museum of American Frontier Culture in Staunton, Virginia, an affiliate of Colonial Williamsburg and the Jamestown - Yorktown Foundation. The Museum focuses exactly on the period you noted.
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Check out Roy Underhill and his books. There were lots of machines then, but many people using old methods too, so you have to carefully define the type of shop...amateur, small town, small production, professional cabinet, furniture, etc. The time window covers a lot of innovation, so there would likely have been a mix of technological levels too. You have a lot of reading to do, and planes to buy! The old tool organizations would be a great source, as well as the antique machinery people (antiquemachinery.woodworking or some such. Wilson

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A triditional shop start is centered around a traditional bench. See "The workbench book" by Landis for a great start.
-Steve

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A Google produced 2,770 entries. enter the following *woodworking shop "nineteenth century"*
http://www.google.com/search?as_q=woodworking+shop+&num &hl=en&ie=UTF-8&btnG=Google+Search&as_epq=nineteenth+century&as_oq=&as_eq=&lr=&as_ft=i&as_filetype=&as_qdr=all&as_nlo=&as_nhi=&as_occt=any&as_dt=i&as_sitesearch=&safe=images

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I would like to thank everyone for their suggestions. Living in California (San Francisco Bay Area) There really are not that many historic parks to visit to get these details.
I have been looking into building that 'first woodworkers workbench'. I have access to a 'table top' piece of eucalyptus that is 4" thick, 3' wide, and 8' long. Will eucalyptus make a good top for the workbench? I know it makes a great 'stump' for my blacksmithing anvil.
Thanks again for all the great details.
Daniel Curry
Zylogue wrote:

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if you can get it to dry without warping or splitting too badly it will make a great bench top.
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