Traditional Raised Panel vs. Raised Panel with Backcutter bits

I'm looking to purchase a raised panel bit and I'm not sure if I should purchase the raised panel bit with backcutter, or just the traditional raised panel bit. I'm leaning towards the one with the backcutter but I'm not sure if there are any drawbacks to these bits. Can you remove the backcutter portion of the bit?
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I looked at these, too. I decided, for the difference in cost, I can easily set up a straight cutter to create a rabbet, if I need one, and I have more control over the dimensions.
I don't think you can remove the back cutter.
Kevin

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I have just completed arched raised panel doors. Initially I bought Woodcraft bits separately but found that the panel bit can only produce the profile if the panel is above the stile and rails. Woodcraft replaced them and I bought a 3 piece CMT set, a little more expensive than the Woodcraft but comes in a nice box, has instructions and a bag with a different size bearing and fit shims.
I cut my panels with the backcutter fitted, which has some disadvantages in a home shop. This is a router table only operation, the bit has a 3 1/2 diamater. My table is 3/4 birch ply extension to the table saw and is 34" wide. The problem comes in how flat is the panel, how much flex is there in the table and can you keep a constant down pressure as the stock passes the cutter head? I cut the profile in typically 3 passes and found it difficult to maintain that constant downward pressure on all cuts, which sometimes results in a less than perfect mitre at the corners. Also as the pressure points can change at different points on successive passes the tongue thickness will be slightly different. Change in downward pressure does not significantly affect the reveal and shows up as a variation of thickness on the backcut, but in my case was hidden within the grooves. This was one time I wish I had a stock feeder, but that wouldn't help on the arched profile.
I have to say I was very impressed with the quality of cut of the CMT set, router set to minimum speed.
Hope this helps.
Bernard R

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snip The problem comes in how flat is the panel, how much flex is there in

I learned that lesson. There's no substitute for a deadass flat, superstrong table. I've also learned the alue of proper stock preparation the hard way:(
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The plus to the backcutter is that you can work with variable thickness panels and still get the preferred panel raise. I've got several panel cutters that will leave the raise flush with the stiles/rails using 5/8" panels, and others with 3/4" panels. If I use the 5/8" (low raise angle) ones on 3/4" panels, it ends up proud the 1/8" and cannot be surfaced easily.
Since I usually am building "one-ofs", the backcutter sets save me time preparing properly thicknessed stock. FWIW, I have a 12-1/2" planer and no drum sander.
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If you use a panel bit with back cutter and are going to do cathedral arch panes it gets REAL interesting when that bit hits the inside up hill curve.
--
Mike G.
snipped-for-privacy@heirloom-woods.net
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