Tough weatherproof coating on Poplar?

http://www.lowes.com/pd/Madison-Mill-Round-Wood-Poplar-Dowel-Actual-72-in-L- x-1-375-in-dia/3852041
I am going to use a piece of that for my tricycle axle.
What should I coat it with to prevent damage from anything?
I would use superglue but that is very expensive for a significant area.
Thanks.
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Do you think poplar will be strong/ hard enough?
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On Monday, August 15, 2016 at 12:26:44 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:

I was going to ask that question, but I decided he knew what he was doing, so I didn't.
Speaking of dowels, last week I bought a 36" length of 5/8" dowel stock, labeled as Beech, from a local crafts store. It seemed really light compared to a short length of of hardwood dowel that I had lying around so I did not feel confident in using it.
The next day I went to local lumber yard and looked at their 5/8" dowel stock, also labeled as Beech. It looked and felt much sturdier. I mentioned that to one of the staff and she said that lots of stores are importing Beech dowels from China and it's pure crap.
Sure enough, I went home and right there on the bar code label of the craft store product was the word "China". I weighed both pieces and the lumber yard dowel was almost 20% heavier than the crafts store dowel.
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On 8/15/2016 12:59 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

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On 8/15/2016 12:59 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

And yet we were recently informed hereabouts just how advanced and upright the Chinese were in their dealings with us.
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On Tuesday, August 16, 2016 at 1:00:05 PM UTC-4, Swingman wrote:

Well, I'm not defending the Chinese, but AISYK there are different species of Beech, some of which are harder than others.
The Chinese aren't wrong in labeling the dowel stock as Beech although it wouldn't be good for anything other than light crafts. In this case, I'd actually place more "blame" on the craft store for selling the crappy Beech for the same price as the lumber yard sells the better stuff. I don't know their cost, but I'd guess the craft store made more profit than the lumber yard.
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On Tue, 16 Aug 2016 11:51:52 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

I have a set of bed sheets made from beech.
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On Tuesday, August 16, 2016 at 6:46:36 PM UTC-4, Markem wrote:

During the summer I go to the beech.
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On 8/16/2016 7:09 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

My neighbor is a son of a beech.
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Seedlings and an old tree in the forest:
Seedling: "Am I a beech or a birch?" Old tree: "You're not a beech or a birch. Your mother was the best piece of ash I've had."
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On Tuesday, August 16, 2016 at 8:51:22 PM UTC-4, krw wrote:

All kidding aside, I have been listening to podcasts from a show called RadioLab out of NYC. Per Wikipedia, "the show focuses on topics of a scientific and philosophical nature." They have distinct audio style, intermixing the voices of the hosts, the interviewees, sound effects, etc.
This podcast, "From Tree To Shining Tree", discusses the relationship between trees in a forest, including how different species interact both underground and within their cell structures.
http://www.radiolab.org/story/from-tree-to-shining-tree/
From the podcast site:
"In this story, a dog introduces us to a strange creature that burrows beneath forests, building an underground network where deals are made and lives are saved (and lost) in a complex web of friendships, rivalries, and business relations. It’s a network that scientists are only just be ginning to untangle and map, and it’s not only turning our understanding of forests upside down, it’s leading some researchers to rethink what it means to be intelligent."
OK, that's the rec.woodworking relate. Another very interesting podcast is this one:
http://www.radiolab.org/story/the_buried_bodies_case/
"This episode we consider a string of barbaric crimes by a hated man, and the attorney who, when called to defend him, also wound up defending a core principle of our legal system. When Frank Armani learned his client? ?s most gruesome secrets, he made a morally startling decision that stunned the wor ld and goes to the heart of what it means to be a defense attorney - how far should lawyers go to provide the best defense to the worst people?"
This case is now a major part of any ethics course taught in law school.
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wrote:

We have a bunch of beach towels, too.
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IMHO, I think you would be better served using a piece of white oak, or even mahogany. Both woods will resist decay much better than poplar. IME, poplar does not survive well in the great outdoors based on some camp gear I made 30 years ago. It literally fell apart after a few years hard use. I stored it outdoors under a roof, but the high humidity caused fungi and rot. SYP is more rot resistant than poplar.
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