Tooting my own horn this time

Page 2 of 3  

Ba r r y wrote:

barry,
I'll be glad to do it that way if you want, but you may want to check shipping costs, added to the book plus tax, etc.
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Congrats! So if the book is $10.17 on Amazon, does that mean you make less money? Who eats the $4.78? Looks like it will be a handy book, anyway.
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Andy wrote:

make
Amazon eats the discount in this case, at least as far as I know. My tiny percentage is unaffected (I hope).
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Good for you Charlie and good luck with sales.
Now more importantly, how is the bird house book coming? :~)

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Leon wrote:

Pocket
off
(www.foxchapelpublishing.com).
duty
Would you believe--I've actually looked at it lately, but done nothiing. Once I realized there was no chance of finishing for last Christmas, I set it aside. With just a touch of luck, I'll finish it by my next birthday (October) so I can sell it for Christmas season. I hope. When I looked at it, I hated the layout I'd done in WV, so that needs lots of work.
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LOL.. pro-crastination... ;~) I'll be looking for it.
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I'll wait till the movie version comes out. ;-) Maybe Redford will play you...
Congratulations and may you sell a zillion copies.
    mahalo,     Redford
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On 19 May 2005 05:27:35 -0700, the inscrutable "Charlie Self"

Congrats on your forty-umpteenth publishing, Charlie. How about posting an in-depth index of the contents. The blurb on the Fox Chapel site is meager at best. Spiral binding is perfect for this app.
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Larry Jaques wrote:

Pocket
off
(www.foxchapelpublishing.com).
duty
Chapel
Thanks. Rough breakdown, by chapter subject: 1 is wood; 2 is mechanical fasteners; 3 is joints; 4 is the shortest of all, shop math & formulas; 5 is finishing; 6 is hand tools; 7 is power tools, 8 isworkbenches & shop set up; 9 is sharpening; 10 is workshop safety. I would have loved to have added a couple chapters and maybe 100 pages, but the format was the message, with it fitting into a shop apron pocket quite easily.
I had three requests for the publisher: spiral binding; heavy duty covers; heavier than normal pages. Oddly enough, I didn't have to ask twice, as all that was already on my editor's list, too. It's a nice feeling when everyone starts out on the same page, with very similar goals. And that is something that doesn't happen often. Fox Chapel provided more feedback than any other publisher I've ever worked with, and accepted my grumpiness over some items better than I expected.
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Won't readability suffer due to the size of the book? I mean, aren't a lot of us well over the age of consent and therefore have a tough time with tiny print?
Dave
Charlie Self wrote:
with it fitting into a shop apron pocket quite easily.

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David wrote:

a
time
The print doesn't seem to me to be that tiny, and my eyes are not fantastic. I was wearing 1.5 reading glasses when I looked, but I can read most of it pretty well at arm's length. As I think I said, the book isn't as thick as I'd have liked, and that's a function of format, but the layout is very skillfully done.
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David wrote:

a
time
Well, many who are having vision problems are also spreading a bit -- bigger aprons may allow for bigger pockets. So perhaps we can expect a "large print" version. So long the publisher doesn't do what the driving atlas vendors do: "new large print" is just short hand for "we left off all the small roads"
Best of luck selling many copies Charlie!
hex -30- -30-
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On 19 May 2005 09:00:45 -0700, the inscrutable "Charlie Self"

Thanks. Yeah, 160 pages seems light. How do you compare it to the Handyman In-Your-Pocket book? It's ~3x5x1" thick and 768 pages. Back to your book, what all is in Chapter 3?
I may add one of your WPRs to my next Amazon run to qualify for the free shipping. (That's my excuse and I'm stickin' to it.)

That's great. Kudos to Fox Chapel pubs!

Very good! Ya lucked out, Mr. Grumps. <g>
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Amazon has several pages plus contents available for viewing. Looks Good!
But printed in China?! Dang, is Nothing Sacred?!
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Lobby Dosser wrote:

can
duty
Chapel
Good!
No, nothing is sacred. Look through almost any book these days, and see if you can find one printed in the U.S. It's unlikely. Someone once said Taunton was one of the few companies doing U.S. printing. The next Taunton tome I picked up, I checked. IIRC, it was printed in Italy..Scott Landis' The Workbench Book. I'm told that it is very slightly slower (transport, I guess), but a huge amount cheaper, to print overseas.
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I just looked through some recent (2000-2004) books I own. One Singapore, one China, and two US. The most recent being China. Sigh!
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On Thu, 19 May 2005 22:42:41 GMT, Lobby Dosser

The last Nakashima book that I bought was printed in China.
And the man only lived about twenty miles from my house.
Nice man, too.
Tom Watson - WoodDorker tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (email) http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1/ (website)
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wrote:

I thought this to be a little bit too much of a teaser to leave alone.
And so, I will tell you the story of the day that I met George (Nakashima).
It was in the early Fall of 1985 and I had recently moved back to Pennsylvania from Manhattan. I was very happy to be on my home ground again.
I had been running high end residential construction work in New York and was beginning to engage myself in the same practice in Pennsylvania. I was tired of the business and really wanted to go back to my roots as a carpenter craftsman, rather than continue the pursuit of more dollars in management.
I had three bibles at this time; two were from Taunton Press, FWW and FHB - the other was the Garrett Wade catalog.
I'd read about Nakashima and his ethic regarding woodworking, and what I'd read made me want to meet him.
Since he was only one county away from me, I decided on a road trip.
I figured that I would show up at his shop at coffee break time, more or less 10:00 am.
I showed up at Mr. Nakashima's shop at precisely 10:00 am, with two cups of the finest local java.
Mr. Nakashima, "is not available". "Would you please call for an appointment."
I slinked away and consumed both cups of coffee, which is always a bad idea for me.
Taking the number from the business card and dialing it up, I was treated to a gruff voice, "This is George."
"Mr. Nakashima?"
"Yes."
"I'm a carpenter from the area and I wanted to visit your shop."
"Do you want to buy it?"
(brief apoplectic pause)
"No Sir, I wanted to see your shop."
"Why would you want to see the shop. It's just a shop."
"Mr. Nakashima, I want to see the wood."
"Do you want to buy some wood?"
"No Sir, I just want to see it."
"Ah... Bring me a cheesesteak from Ralph's. I'll show you the wood."
"Is Noon a good time?"
"No. One O'clock. Tell Ralph it's for George, he'll know what to do."
I kicked around town for a bit, asked someone where Ralph's might be, got an answer and some advice to get extra cheese, since Ralph was a bit stingy unless asked. Finally I ordered up and went back to Mr. Nakashima's place.
Since I looked like what I was, someone who was delivering lunch, I was allowed straight in.
"You're Tom, the carpenter?"
"Yes Sir, Mr. Nakashima?"
"Ever had a cheesesteak from Ralph's?"
"No sir, I never have."
"You're in for a treat!"
(much eating and small talk)
"So Tom, why are you so interested in the wood?"
"I like wood."
"Honest answer. A little brief."
"I've seen your work and read about your work and it all seems to be about the wood. I want to see the wood that inspires you."
There are times when you deal with a person who is unknown to you, and you make a comment that, in the moment seemed to be right but, upon further reflection, you wish that you could take it...
"...It does inspire me. Don't be afraid to say what you think. It does inspire me, and it inspires the people that I sell my work to."
(awkward pause)
"Let's show you the wood."
There was one barn and two outbuildings on the property. The wood was stored vertically in some areas and on the flat in others. The wood was massive, the cuts being eight inches thick in some instances.
There were full logs with the bark still on them.
There was more cabinet grade wood than I have ever seen before or since under the roof of a privately owned shop.
As we walked among the stored treasures of his professional life, he became more animated and more poetic, and it really seemed as though it didn't matter if I was there or not - the man was lost in his wood.
He knew where each piece had been cut and how it had been cut. He had plans in his head for certain pieces.
We spent almost three hours looking at the wood. I was beginning to feel guilty.
"I don't do this enough. I'm happy that you came. And thanks for the cheesesteak."
"Thank you for taking all this time, Mr. Nakashima."
"You can call me George."
"Yes Sir, Mr. Nakashima.'
"Well...all right then."
I guess I went there looking for Yoda.
I found George.
It was a pretty good day.
Tom Watson - WoodDorker tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (email) http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1/ (website)
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"Tom Watson" wrote > [snip]

[snip]

Tom,
Thank you. You are keeping mighty high company ... could be that you belong with that elevated group.
Keep writing, keep talking to the wood. Live well.
Regards,
Rick
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On Fri, 20 May 2005 02:09:27 GMT, the inscrutable "Rick"

Dittoes, Rick and Tawm.
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