Tools and accessories to buy from HF

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On Mon, 18 Feb 2013 07:34:23 -0500, "Mike Marlow"

Thanks, I just happen to have to pass in the area of a HF today so I will pick one up. That one seems to be the one with the best reviews and at that price I don't have much to loose.
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On Fri, 15 Feb 2013 02:06:58 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I bought one and returned it. The blade kept coming loose. And yes, I *really* tightened it. Others have reported the same problem. You must have gotten the rare good one.
I've had good luck with their Pittsburgh bar clamps. Anywhere from 6" to 24". The 30" are a bit too flexible, but OK for light clamping.
Single edge razor blades. Not for woodworking, but model building and cleaning aquarium glass.
Barring future problems, the 1"x30" belt sander I just bought seems well worth the money.
Agree on the nitrile gloves.
I've also bought the occasional odd size socket wrench there. They don't get heavy use, but none have broken yet.
--
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On 2/15/2013 5:06 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I made a cabinet for mine and replaced my old parts bin. This is much easier to find things in. http://imgur.com/a/YbWt2#5 I give these storage bins a higher rating than the plano (usa made) units. 2.99 on sale vs 7.99 at home depot.
Dial fractional caliper http://www.harborfreight.com/6-inch-fractional-dial-caliper-92437.html Wish I had bought this before I bought all my digitals... I bought the blind mans unit from Lee Valley, good but digital is hard to work with if you are not a machinist, and the HF is accurate w/fractions. I paid $17 on sale.. it was $19 plus 20% off coupon.
I have some old drill bit index from them, pretty good. I agree about the modern, the grind doesn't look as good. Tape measures... the free one's are worth the coupon. I also have a fostner bit set from them about 12 years old. Very good.
The 4 1/2 grinder is awesome... I regreased mine and glad I did, it will last forever.
I have an older Staple /brad gun, I wanted it for narrow staples.. never had a problem with it. Thanks for the info on the new ones. I have both the cheap hvlp conversion and more expensive hvlp conversion. both are good, the more expensive is a little better, the holes are drilled finer, and more... very well worth it.
My experience with their sandpaper is mixed. I didn't like their sponges bought 10 years ago... I did like the 6x48 coarse belt that I just bought.
I like their old blue flux welder... works great with lincoln tips and lincoln wire.
The welding mask was $34.99 when I got it. The same thing in other places is over $100 , and no different. I love being able to see before I strike.
I bought a beam cutter for my drill press. Great for $10 and I saw a hint online that made sense. Reverse one cutter and cut inside and outside at the same time... Damn if that wasn't the ticket. The carbide cutters are great.
The gloves.... well like you said... I want to grab the 7mil next time since the older light blue were stronger in the past.
I bought the alloy tap set, I wanted metric and for the price I couldn't go wrong, its good, not great, but good and acceptable.
I normally buy the higher end wheels for carts, but a few carts didn't need them so I tried their blue wheels, They work better than the rubber crap wheels of old, and seem to be carrying the load. At $2.99 on sale I could not beat it.
Their F clamps are good for the price, but were even better when I first encountered them, I notice the rubber covers not fitting and some of them are twisted (casting). But I have bought a load of them since one can never have too many clamps... the wood ones are shit.
Their old Aluminum bar clamps were very good, and so were their pipe clamp 3/4 heads.. One day I'm going to make a roubo bench top for my bench so I can raise my work and I'll use those to tighten the vise.
I have a bunch of their free lights.. small and don't cost anything, so you can put them all around, and when you drop something you don't have to look far to find a light.
Locking vise grips (Kreg style) 4.99 a piece, bought a couple and are great. Not as great as Leon's auto sizing clamps (NICE).
LINK BELTS... used to be USA made, now made in Italy They are green, but as good as the red ones. A little wider, so I am replacing my drill press one so I can get the two belts closer when needing that in between speed. But I use these everywhere else. Awesome.
Step drills. The small set was great for $6.99 the larger set for $8.99 I had to return two sets to get a sharp one. Great for cheap sheet metal cutter. You need the better sales.
Automatic brake bleeder, awesome.. Drifts... bought years ago... awesome
Movers dolly, pick the right one, because most are crap... check the wheels.... make sure they swivel with weight.. only 9.99 on sale. Should have gotten another.
Metal hand punch... no longer stocked, worked great, spent $19 looked elsewhere before hand, same setup was close to $100. Has lasted 13 years. Great for sheet metal work and preparing rivet holes.
Ground fault plug in (used to identify backward wiring and whether the ground fault trips). The best for next to nothing, compared to name brands selling at easily 4 times as much.
Glue bottles... $2 easy to squeeze and haven't blown one yet. Take your gallon and divide it up.
--
Jeff

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*snip*

*snip*
How have the batteries lasted? For some stupid reason, many models don't turn off when you press the OFF button. The display goes blank, but it keeps using battery.
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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"Puckdropper" wrote ...

Since I only use it occasionally, I always take the battery out when I put it away. It seemed like the prudent thing to do.
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On Sat, 16 Feb 2013 01:31:59 -0500, "Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam* at comcast dot net> wrote:

Mine is a HF 6" digital, does mm/in/frac, and is 8-9mo old. The battery is still going strong. It came with a spare, too.
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On 2/15/2013 10:42 PM, Puckdropper wrote:

Something to watch out for, I commonly use a Tilt Box to set angles on my TS, I seldom use it but the battery was almost always dead when I wanted to use it. I have a cheap brand caliper and the batter goes on and on and on....
Both have cases, the TiltBox brand has a soft case, the other, a hard case. I discovered that the soft case does not protect the unit from being turned on by a simple bump inside a drawer or even in my case holding the case improperly when putting the tool back in it's soft case. I found that after putting the unit in the soft case and immediately pulling it back out that the unit was on again as it came out of the case. Paying attention to this detail has extended battery life considerably.
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Puckdropper wrote:

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Hey, I forgot one that I'm quite pleased with -- the $30 right angle drill, which I use for sanding on the lathe. Corded, variable speed and works great.
Larry
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A boat yard presents a totally different challenge to tools than you would normally see in a woodworking shop.
Tried HF 4" right angle sander/grinder and burned it up in less than an hour.
Tried a 2nd one, it lasted about 1/2 hour.
About the only one that survives has been Milwaukee.
Sanding fiberglass is a different world.
Also use a right angle sander/grinder for hours on end.
Sander/grinder gets blown out on a weekly basis.
When it comes to corded tools in the boat yard, there is Milwaukee and those that want to be Milwaukee with the exception of Fein and Festool.
Have no experience with Festool.
Fein multitool is a sweetheart.
All that being said, buy a lot of consumables at HF.
Chip brushes by the box.
Non sterile surgical gloves.
Quick connect plugs and sockets for air lines.
Air line blow guns.
Air operated drills.
1/2" air hoses.
Once upon an time, 24" bar clamps, haven't looked lately.
Spring clamps.
Feather boards.
Tried and returned a sand blaster.
Lew
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On 2/15/2013 11:23 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

LOL! Saw one of the sand/bed blasting cabinets in the nearby HF that just opened in the last couple months. Both of the rubberized gloves attached to the cabinet had failed. Appeared to have disintegrated (in part) as opposed to being purposely ripped or torn by some juvenile delinquent.
HF is caveat emptor playland but as we've all noted they do some things well - sometimes<g>
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wrote:

I have a friend of mine that does light manufacturing and some metal finishing that has that HF stand up sand blasting cabinet. He likes it a lot, but found he didn't have anywhere near the compressor he needed to run it. He wound up buying a monster, then screams bloody murder at the price of the different blast mediums.
Likes the cabinet, though. ;^)
Robert
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On Sat, 16 Feb 2013 13:45:39 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

I've always wondered about sandblasting, the cost of it and the effort required.
Is special sand required? Cost of that sand? Can sand be reused at all? How much sand is used to strip a few square feet? Is there gallons of it to clean up afterwards?
For all the stripping abilities that sandblasting affords, is it something the average home shop person might want to use or afford?
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"Dave" wrote:

yes --------------------------------

can be pricey ---------------------------------

it can be reclaimed -----------------------------------

depends on how much you are trying to clean, how thick is the coating being removed. --------------------------------------------------

if you used gallons, then yes. ------------------------------------------

you need a big compressor.
i had a 5hp, 2 stage compressor with an 80 gal tank.
it wasn't enough.
lew
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On Sat, 16 Feb 2013 13:24:18 -0700, Mike Marlow wrote

I bought the small benchtop unit many moons ago when it was < $100. It worked well for my purposes (cleaning small car parts, brackets, etc.)
Of course the gloves disintegrated.
It requires a big compressor to keep going (> 5HP). The plastic window gets trashed instantly if the sand spray ever gets too close. Basically its a box with a light bulb that holds one of those cheap blasting guns with the steel tips. If you are going to be doing blasting regularly, buy a 'real' unit, otherwise just get the cheap gun and do it outside.
-Bruce
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This is a decent set of HSS lathe tools. A good spindle gouge, two skew chisels, couple scrapers, and a couple roughing gouges.
http://www.harborfreight.com/garage-shop/stationary-wood-lathes/8-piece-high-speed-steel-wood-lathe-chisel-set-69723.html
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On Feb 16, 1:22 am, " snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com"

I have actually seen and used those tools. When giving a sharpening class to my old wood turning club, I had a chance to sharpen them up and try them out. They are a heckuva value and were very well made. Nothing wrong with that M2 HSS either, it is the same steel used by Penn State on their branded tools. I have a bag full of those PSI tools and like them.
Robert
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On Fri, 15 Feb 2013 23:22:29 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

As long as you don't believe their description. There are no roughing gouges shown in the photo - if it is correct what they are calling roughing gouges are a couple of shallow spindle gouges.
That said, I've recommended the set to several beginning turners with the caveat that it's not for bowl turning.
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On Saturday, February 16, 2013 11:13:52 AM UTC-6, Larry Blanchard wrote:

If you look at the picture, the two gouges at the top of the picture are ro ughing gouges. They are about 3/4" or so wide. They are made, designed, s haped like roughing gouges sold by the name brand chisel makers. Rolled fl at steel, not forged cylinder. Spindle gouges are forged from a cylinder o f steel. One 1/4" or so spindle gouge is in the set. I guess I think of s pindle gouges as 1/2", 3/8", and 1/4". Cylinders, not rolled flat steel. Spindle gouges can be used to make curves and beads of the same size as the steel cylinder. A roughing gouge made from rolled flat steel can only be used to make wide shallow cuts and make something round. You cannot make b eads with roughing gouges.
http://www.harborfreight.com/garage-shop/stationary-wood-lathes/8-piece-hig h-speed-steel-wood-lathe-chisel-set-69723.html
This is Penn State Industries 3/4" roughing gouge. Identical to the two so ld in the Harbor Freight set. Of course 3/4" is not a very good size for a roughing gouge. 1.5" or so is much better. But... http://www.pennstateind.com/store/LX250.html
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On Sat, 16 Feb 2013 13:58:53 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Those are *not* roughing gouges, no matter what HF and PS call them. If you go to:
http://www.robert-sorby.co.uk/gouges.htm
you will see drawings of all different types of gouges. Note that the profile we're talking about is defined as spindle gouges. The profile shown for a roughing gouge is almost a complete half circle.
Or look at this site:
http://www.woodcraft.com/search2/search.aspx?query=roughing%20gouge
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