Tool You Just Love To Use

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Earlier thread asked about most often used tolls (stationary, as it happens).
Different question. What tool do you just like to use? Be it a kick, or a zen experience, it's the one you just look for an excuse to grab.
For me, it's an old 603C (type 2) with a Hock blade. Something about the size, balance, and the whispers it makes on wood, just makes me grab it any chance I get. I even misuse it, when a larger or smaller plane would be more appropriate. Heck, I used it to flatten and smooth the top of an old Sjoberg bench I picked up at a garage sale! Coulda used the 607C, but that beast is big, heavy, and ugly and the 608 is just uglier.
Maybe I'll just dump all the rest of the planes rather than let them sit, unused, in my plane hanger (that's what I call the shelf they live on).
Tom
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Tom Banes wrote:

For the complete and utter change that it creates, my planer.
I send ugly ass 100 year old barnboards through it and out comes the most beautiful salmon colored (coloured David) oak you've ever seen.
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Hey Duke, I agree with you one hundred percent and I was thinking the same tool thoughts before I read your post. My planer gives me instant gratification- it's more of a toy than a tool. Second to that is the my router because it too makes the most contrasting chanfge toa piece of wood than any other tool. Planers Forever! Long live planers! Marc
Duke of Burl wrote:

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On Sun, 13 Aug 2006 15:40:25 -0500, Tom Banes

Not sure yet; I've got a Lie Nielsen low-angle block plane that I love using, but just got an LN spokeshave (to help with the curved sections of the bed project). After using the new Veritas sharpening jig to get it shaving sharp, I spent some time with some curved scrap last night -- this may become the new favorite.
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
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the 603c is the only one i have and i too use it for everything. i love the effect that it has on wood after some work using it. i love the crisp 90 degree edges i get on the boards after using it and unlike some other planes ive used its not just about the outcome. its a pleasure to use through out the whole proccess.
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As strange as it sounds I enjoy using my table saw, although I typically use it for short periods of time. A close second is my lathe--a truly strange machine because hours go by when it feels like minutes. I found that a sharp tool is a joy to use.
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opin'd:

My coping saw. It doesn't get used much, but I LOVE the feel of it in my hand when I need to cope something.
Why? Because it's the first tool I ever bought; I picked it up at a garage sale when I was about 10 or thereabouts.
-Don
--
"What do *you* care what other people think?" --Arline Feynman

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Is that the only reason? I've had a coping saw since I was about that age and I hate it. Sometimes it's the only tool for the job, but for some reason I can never get mine to work well. The blades always seem to bend; I can't even make a flat cut in 1/2" thick pine, it seems.
If someone told me, "Your saw is no good, neither are your blades; here's where you go to buy one that works..." I'd listen and give it a try.
I did buy a fret saw with about the same luck. I fancied myself doing beautiful inlays, you know, the kind that have the 7 degree sloping edges so they drop right in place and fit perfectly after a little sanding. I haven't produce a single one yet.
Bah. Humbug.
Today I painted spruce 2x4s. (Select. "Premium Quality" says Home Depot. What a joke.) Now there's fine woodworking for you.
- Owen -
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Greetings.....I am not trying to be critical...since I myself was guilty of this for a long time...I had the teeth of the saw pointing the wrong way....like it was trying to cut on the push stroke...similarto to a hacksaw...when I read that coping saws cut on the pull stroke...I said to myself...no wonder it don't cut right...

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Honestly, I don't know. I just went down to the shop to check. The fret saw had the teeth pointed for a pull cut, but the coping saw was in the toolbox "unloaded". I'll certainly keep it in mind the next time I use it, though. Thanks for the reminder.
- Owen -
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One other thing I found with coping saws was that the handle and blade should be tight. There should be no play in the blade.
I can't cut straight through a piece of 2x4 with it, but that's ME and not the saw.
Picked mine up from Menards just after Christmas.
Puckdropper
--
Wise is the man who attempts to answer his question before asking it.

To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
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Owen Lawrence wrote:

Something I've used for both coping and hacksaws is to put the blades in Japanese style. (ie. backwards to the NA "norm")
Blades never bend and I feel I have more control when I'm cutting with the pull stroke than with the push stroke. I'm not sure if I actually do have more control, but it feels better for some reason.
Tanus

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This is not really a sig.

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No. I like coping inside miters on moldings and this little saw does a pretty nice job -- if I have a decent blade in it. I got some blades at Menard's a while back, and they were NASTY; I threw them away and got some better ones at a local hardware store. I shouldn't try to save a few bux like that, I guess . . . .

Either might be a problem. I found out blades make a huge difference, and I've used other coping saws I didn't like nearly as well. Maybe your saw doesn't tension the blade enough?
-Don
--
"What do *you* care what other people think?" --Arline Feynman

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On Sun, 13 Aug 2006 15:40:25 -0500, Tom Banes

There are just too many jokes here..............<g>
Mike O.
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Thought that myself. Figured I'd just keep quite.
wrote:

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Tom Banes wrote:

My Veritas shoulder planes, jack plane, and jointer plane. I'm not so keen on the first one I bought; the BU smoother--not enough heft. I also enjoy using my Performax because it's the newest toy in the shop.
Dave
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I have a 604, 605, 607 Bedrocks and I do love to use the 604 as you like the 603. I will say that I recently acquired a 5 1/2 Baily and it is the plane I reach for more often than not. Another tool I use a lot is a 1" Stanley 750 chisel that is dead flat on the back. I can pare tenons with it that looks like a shoulder plane did it.
Should I mention my Starret square or my LV apron plane or my LN 60 1/2 rabbet plane?
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Tom Banes wrote:

I get a kick out of taking a Pro Prep scraper to a newly glued up panel. The glue line just zips right off. It's also fun to pop off all of the little drips from bench tops. Highly recommended.
JP
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: Tom Banes wrote: :> Different question. What tool do you just like to use? Be it a kick, :> or a zen experience, it's the one you just look for an excuse to grab.
: I get a kick out of taking a Pro Prep scraper to a newly glued up : panel.
Is this a handled scraper?
    -- Andy Barss
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Andrew Barss wrote:

Looks like it http://www.hartvilletool.com/product/11211 Joe
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