Tool Quiz -- How many can you answer?


I did a post similar to this 5 years ago and it was generally received as interesting and educational. The following photos are of hand tools from my personal collection and all are shown somewhere in the Hand Tool Page(s) on my vanity website (URL in my signature). See how many you can answer.
1. Let's start with an easy one. What is the model # of this Stanley plane?
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/tool_quiz_1.jpg
2. What is this Stanley tool? What was it used for?
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/tool_quiz_2.jpg
3. These two Stanley tools have similar handles but are quite different. What are they and what are they used for? (a)
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/tool_quiz_3a.jpg
(b)
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/tool_quiz_3b.jpg
4. What is this tool called and what is it used for?
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/tool_quiz_4.jpg
5. What are these used for?
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/tool_quiz_5.jpg
6. These were removed from some block planes. What are they called?
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/tool_quiz_6.jpg
7. These two tools are used in the same carpentry task. What are they called and how are they used? (a)
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/tool_quiz_7a.jpg
(b)
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/tool_quiz_7b.jpg
8. These three planes were all made for the same purpose. What were they used for? (a)
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/tool_quiz_8a.jpg
(b)
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/tool_quiz_8b.jpg
(c)
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/tool_quiz_8c.jpg
9. These planes were all manufactured by Stanley. What are the model numbers of these planes? (a)
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/tool_quiz_9a.jpg
(b)
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/tool_quiz_9b.jpg
(c)
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/tool_quiz_9c.jpg
(d)
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/tool_quiz_9d.jpg
(e)
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/tool_quiz_9e.jpg
(f)
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/tool_quiz_9f.jpg
10. This device was used with a brace. What was it used for?
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/tool_quiz_10.jpg
11. What are the correct names for these two saws? What are these two saws used for? (a)
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/tool_quiz_11a.jpg
(b)
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/tool_quiz_11b.jpg
12. This is a Stanley marking gauge (scribe). For what purpose was this gauge designed?
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/tool_quiz_12.jpg
13. This device was made by Goodell Pratt. What was it called? (a)
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/tool_quiz_13a.jpg
How did it work? Here is a hint. (b)
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/tool_quiz_13b.jpg
14. The following two planes are both smoothing planes. In what country were they made? (a)
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/tool_quiz_14a.jpg
(b)
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/tool_quiz_14b.jpg
15. This spokeshave was often called the cigar shave. Who manufactured this tool?
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/tool_quiz_15.jpg
16. What is this device called? What was it used for?
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/tool_quiz_16.jpg
17. What was this tool used for?
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/tool_quiz_17.jpg
The last three are more difficult. Each shows pieces which have been removed from a woodworking tool.
18. What are these? From what tool were they removed?
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/tool_quiz_18.jpg
19. These are accessories used with a Stanley tool. What tool are they used with?
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/tool_quiz_19.jpg
20. From what Stanley tool was this piece removed?
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/tool_quiz_20.jpg
I will post answers in 2 or 3 days following your replies.
Ken Vaughn Visit My Workshop: http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65 / Hand Tools Page: http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/handtools.html
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Ken Vaughn wrote:

55
Depth gauge for auger bits

First one is a scraper plane for wood, second is a belt maker's plane for scarfing leather belts used as drive belts in old-timey shaft driven machinery.

Inshave used for hollowing out areas such as chair seats.

Drawknife gauges to allow uniform chamfering

Knuckle cap irons.

Clapboard gauge used to set clapboard exposure. Clapboard marking gauge used to mark cut length.

Tongue and groove.

a). scrub planes 40 and 40 1/2. b). 112 scraper plane c). 278 rabbet and fillester d). 62 low angle block e). 289 rabbet and fillester f). 20 1/2 circular plane

Cutting tenons on the end of square or round stock

Stair and keyhole

92 butt and rabbet gauge

Never saw one before but I'm guessing it's an autofeed.

ECE Primus made in Germany

Millers Falls I think.

Jointer gauge - clamps to the side of a plane so you plane at a specific angle.

Leatherworkering - used to cut strips of leather.

Flat and curved bottom draw knife blocks - the number escapes me.

Stanley 66 hand beader fence and double ended router blade.

Adjustable bottom skate for the 55

Thanks, Ken.
R
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RicodJour wrote:

Omitted the second one due to low blood sugar - Norris A5 smoothing plane.
R
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You really know your tools!
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Ken Vaughn wrote:

Thanks. It's an addiction. It was a choice between crack and old tools - old tools won. Crack would have been cheaper. ;)
R
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Ken Vaughn wrote:

Don't know what they are called but the first one looks like it for setting the spacing on wood siding. Can't answer any of the others, looks like I have a lot to learn.
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Wow. RicodJour is a tough act to follow.
#13 is a chain drill used for boring into metal with a hand brace. Photo b shows the indexing wheel which advances the screw which tightens the chain a tad with every revolution of the bit. I have one of these and have never used it.
Art

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Exactly, although I think the chain which originally came with the drill used slightly different shaped links. The chuck is a 3-jaw Jacobs style chuck and not the type used with auger bits so I am guessing it was used mostly with metal (twist) bits. I found this chain drill at an antique shop years ago -- tried it once and it worked OK.
Ken
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Well RecodJour pretty much nailed it. Answers and a few more photos follow.

time when it was made.
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/stanley_55_cutters.jpg

the depth of the hole.

(3a) is a scraper plane pushed forward with the handles and the scraper blade inclined towards the front with a slight hook formed on the blade, which was usually sharpened to around 45 degrees. (3b) is a belt makers plane used to chamfer the ends of a leather belt so they could be glued together in a scarf joint to form a continuous belt of uniform thickness. These wide leather belts were used to drive equipment that were connected to a water or steam driven line shaft.

seats, scoop out the center of a bowl, or other tasks.

limit the depth of a chamfer cut by the knife.
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/chamfer_guides.jpg

planes, the Stanley #18 and Stanley #65 low angle.
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/favorite_block_planes.jpg
Sargent also used a similar lever cap
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/sargent_knuckle_joint.jpg

when nailing clapboard siding to a building. It was used as follows -- there are two sharp tabs on the top of the metal plate (not visible in the photo). These were inserted up and under the current top clapboard siding and the handle moved to one side forcing a spur into the clapboard below the top clapboard and holding it in place. The next siding was placed on the L-shaped bracket at the top and the carpenter nailed it in place. (7b) is a Stanley 88 clapboard siding marker. It was used as shown in the following photo to mark the end of a clapboard so it could be cut to butt up against the casing which formed the corner boards.
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/stanley_88_use.jpg
And before someone comments -- I just grabbed a piece of scrap to demonstrate. I am not planning to side my shop with walnut.

(8a) is a Stanley #48 tongue and groove match plane. With the fence in the position shown, both cutters are exposed and the plane cuts a tongue. When the fence was rotated on the center pivot pin, only one of the cutters is exposed and the plane cuts the matching groove as shown in the following photo:
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/stanley_48_fence.jpg
(8b) is a Stanley #148 which did the same thing depending on which direction you push it. (8c) is a wooden body plane made by H. Chapin which was the early equivalent of the #148

rosewood handles look larger than the one with beech handles (older), but they are actually the same size. (9b) This is a Stanley #112 scraper plane. It is basically the same plane as the #12 discussed above under (3a) but with a plane body and tote (handle). (9c) This is a Stanley #278 rabbet and filletster plane (fence not shown) -- it is kind of a funky looking plane
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/stanley_278.jpg
(9d) This is a Stanley #62 low angle block plane -- about the size of a jack plane and with the cutter iron bedded at 12 degrees -- a very useful plane (9e) This is a Stanley #289 rabbet and filletster plane, The cutter iron was set at a skew angle. It is shown here with the fence
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/stanley_289.jpg
(9f) This is a Stanley Victor #20 circular plane used in much the same manner as the Stanley #113 circular plane shown below:
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/stanley_113.jpg

end of a chair spindle or wagon spoke. Often used along with a chamfer or pointing device such as shown in this photo:
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/hollow_auger_pointer.jpg

trenching out stringers, making slots for stair treads or risers, and cutting dadoes. (11b) is an old Simonds apple wood handled compass saw with a tapered blade and with a lot of set to the teeth. This saw was primarily used to cut irregular shapes or round hole in a piece of wood.

butt hinges on a door and jam similar to the familiar #95:
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/stanley_butt_gauge.jpg
Because of its versatility, it could also be used to layout mortise and tenon joints

post and insert the loose end into a slot in the tool. With each revolution of the brace a steel pin would rotate a star wheel which in turn would rotate a gear and draw the bit into the object being drilled.

(14b) is a Norris 5A infill smoother, made in London, England

or jointer plane to assist is keeping the sole of the plane at a pre-determined angle, usually 90 degrees. Here is a photo of the jointer gauge attached to a fore plane:
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/386_in_use.jpg

was often used to cut leather harness straps for horse or mule teams.

Universal spokeshaves:
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/stanley_67.jpg

http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/stanley_66.jpg
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/stanley_66_2.jpg
called the tower, which came with a Stanley #55 plane. It is often missing from these planes. Here it is shown in place at the front of the plane:
http://home.earthlink.net/~kvaughn65k/stanley_55_2.jpg

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