Tool quality.

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Ba r r y wrote:

Is that the plane that flys at or slightly above the speed of smell (plagarized /stolen from Ron White, humorist Texan and part time alcoholic?)
charlie b
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You mean Tater Salad?
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On Sun, 06 Mar 2005 21:39:46 -0800, the inscrutable charlie b

<g> It's a jet which can fly low and slow, then spit fire like adragon. I saw one on the ground first (vs. in the air) and it looked elegant in a funky sort of way. A couple minutes later, I saw a nice littel package called the Vulcan mini-gun on a steel cart. (I secretly wanted to see that little thing in the back of my pickup but knew I'd never get if off the Miramar Naval Air Station alive. ;)
Anyway, I've been hooked on the A-10 ever since, warts and all. The History Channel did an hour show on them and they're impressive. My dad came home from VietNam with a bullet hole in the aircraft and a dent in the bottom the seat of his C-123 where small-arms (AK?) fire almost denutted him. (He was over there flying at 1000 feet to drop crates of chickens, pigs, and cows to the South Vietnamese for food. Ever heard the moo of a cow on a parachute?) Anyway, the armored bottom of the A-10 gives the pilot a lot more peace of mind, I'm sure.
========================================================= I drank WHAT? + http://www.diversify.com --Socrates + Web Application Programming
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An airplane which proved unsuited to the task for which it was intended - hosing Soviet armor as it tried to force the Fulda gap.
Planned to be a two-seater, made a single, where the load on the pilot was so large in the weather that prevails so often in Germany, it went into the guard in record time. It's done great work in clear air and with upgrade avionics.
The blackbird is one of the finest machines out there. When dad first came to Beale, he described an SR with a T38 chase as "the shark and a pilotfish." Of course, the Okinawans called her Habu, which also seemed suitable. A night takeoff was almost a religious experience for onlookers.
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George wrote:

lights when one goes overhead is rather impressive. We could hear each other talk by the time we left the perimeter road and hit the base area. Joe
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That would be the Carl Vinson. I posted a couple of pics of it on ABPW
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wrote:

Not exactly:
P-38 Lightning B-29 Superfortress B-17 Flying Fortress B-24 Liberator P-51 Mustang F-15 Eagle F-22 Raptor F-16 Falcon F-117 Nighthawk
I'd say we have a pretty good history of naming things. Although I grant you the Brit's choice for warships is pretty good. Ours were more for states (battleships), and for people of note (Kennedy, Reagan, Forrestal, Eisenhower). OTOH, our sub class name choices aren't too bad: Sea Wolf, Poseidon, Trident. Some of our missile choices are pretty good: Sidewinder, Tomahawk, Maverick, HARM, Javelin, Minuteman, Titan.

+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ The absence of accidents does not mean the presence of safety Army General Richard Cody +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
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But...
Didn't we (Muricans) name a tank after Norm?
UA100, trying to bring it back around to being on topic....
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It was somewhere outside Barstow when Unisaw A100

Why do you think the turret armour is all so big and boxy ? - Plywood
Mind you, polyurethane turned out to be pretty impermeable, if you put it on thick enough.
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and providing you sand between coats in a TIMESAVER(R).
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Andy Dingley wrote:

--RC
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A Brough would be my dream bike.
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Badgerf responds:

First bike I ever fell off, a gardengate manx, mum made dad sell it after that, I was only 10 at the time....Got me a few BMW's down the years, still got a '52 G80C Matchless though ;-)
Love to get hold of an old Matchless or AJS. I'm not sure what the Gardengate version of Manx was...in the States we only got the Manx, hairpin valve springs and all.
The friend who owned that Manx raced it at Laconia (NH) a couple of times before things got as formal as they are now...they barely required a helmet back then ('56, '57, '58). I don't know what happened to the bike, and I haven't heard from Gene since he showed up at my apartment in Albany, NY, with girlfriend (something he was never without after about his 14th birthday), driving an old VW back from CA. Every concealed spot on that car was filled with grass (not for sale, though). This was about '68 or '69. He was a real wandered, by that time a master machinist, and still crazy. He was in touch with my mother a few times after that, but I could never catch up with him. Then she moved.
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Yeah... quality tools, I am very blessed that I get to use Oliver equipement in adult ed. A 14/16" table saw, 12" jointer and a 24" thicknesser/planer. Awesome machines too, they have this "arcane" beauty and quality to them that is undaunted. Sorry for the bad terminology but I have no way of describing it. I hear from a saw service business owner (http://www.carbide.com /) that there are people out there that are obsessed with Oliver machines, dealing in them and collecting them. There is an Oliver No. 80 at a local lumber and hardware business and that saw is amazing. The whole table tilts, has it's own sliding sections if I remember correctly, and the huge motor has shafts on both ends. The other end has it's own lower table so it can be used as a borer. Sounds like a space ship engine from Star Wars, like the jointer at adult ed. The No. 80 can be set up two ways, belt drive and as it is, direct drive.
--
Alex
cravdraa_at-yahoo_dot-com
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