Too Many Clamps, Not Enough Hands

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snipped-for-privacy@eznet.net says...

Get at least 6 more quickgrips. They are great for holding things together lightly while you get the f-clamps with pads in place. AND they are actually quite good in their own right where you don't need high clamping pressure. AND they're single handed operation.
As they said, a second pair of hands to stop everything from falling over. Has the disadvantage of restricting the use of Language ...
I've been known to build scaffolds where I couldn't do things any other way. One advantage to not having the shop lined: in a pinch I can always tack a 4x1 to a stud to supply bracing. On the whole I'd rather have the lining, I think.
-P.
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Tip: Self aligning, self supporting joinery
And if you use mortise and tenon joints - chamfer the end of the tenon so that it'll go into the mortise if you're close rather than exactly dead on right. Also redues the chances of splitting off the corner of a tenon while trying to get it in the mortise. And if you can chamfer the edge of the mortise it makes fitting things together easier.
http://web.hypersurf.com/~charlie2/DasBench/CBbench19.html
charlie b
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charlieb wrote:

Good tip, Charlie. Not that any of my mortices have ever been mis-aligned or anything.
;-)
Bill
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http://nmwoodworks.com
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DerbyDad03 wrote: | OK, so I don't really have too many clamps, but I definitely don't | have enough hands. | | I'm looking for some tips on clamping up projects. Between the | cauls, pads, parts, angles, etc. it seems I'm always dropping | something, missing my mark or just basically having a hard time | lining everything up. | | Most of my clamps are steel f-clamps with a few wooden Jorgensens | and a couple of QuickGrips. | | Any tips to share?
It's always good to have a few C-clamps handy.
I glue up a lot of right angle stuff. The aluminum face frame clamps (they come in two types) are fantastic for this kind of clamping. I have a photo of both types (along with a few C-clamps) in use in the photos at the top of http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/SC_Madison.html
I try to keep a supply of allthread (threaded rod stock) and threaded knobs in the shop for making special-purpose clamps. There's a photo of one example at http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/drawer_clamp.html
I've also tried to keep track of sources of clamp parts for building clamps that aren't available off-the-shelf. There's a picture of a clamp I use for splicing sheet goods at the top of http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/PT_Sign.html
I've built a few cam-type clamps out of 2x stock and aluminum angle, screw type clamps that attach to t-track, vacuum clamps (for use with a recycled refrigerator compressor as the vacuum pump), and a pile of clamp extenders (which extend the "reach" of small clamps to hold work bigger than the clamp). Don't be afraid to roll your own.
HTH
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto /
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DerbyDad03 wrote:
> I'm looking for some tips on clamping up projects.
C-Clamps, lots of C-Clamps.
50-3", 40-4" and 30-6" will get you started.
I started with those, found I needed more.
YMMV.
Lew
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The OP really didn't say WHAT he was gluing up...
I've been doing book shelves and the like lately, and bought 2 pairs of these:
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&pS673&cat=1,43838
They're not really "clamps", they just hold enough to let you align the pieces and hold them until you can really clamp or fasten them... Nice because they're "one handed"....
mac
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Sun, Jul 15, 2007, 9:29am (EDT-3) snipped-for-privacy@eznet.net (DerbyDad03) doh lamet: OK, so I don't really have too many clamps, but I definitely don't have enough hands.
A couple of brads, just until the clamp is set. LMAO
JOAT I do things I don't know how to do, so that I might learn how to do them. - Picasso
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On Mon, 16 Jul 2007 14:28:52 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

yep... the latex paint will hide the holes...
mac
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Thicker cauls require fewer clamps. Jorgenson F-clamps go on before Bessey F-clamps.
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The Lee Valley little one hander black plastic corner/ T clampish things help compensate for being limited to only two hands.
Another less than obvious "holding device" is a bag of lead shot. At about a buck a pound, they're kind of handy for holding things down and when stacked, holding things up. And they don't mark the wood, or even if there's a finish on it. If you don't want to keep it in bags then put it in a completely lock miter joined box and add a handle. http://web.hypersurf.com/~charlie2/LockMiter/LockMiterBox1.html
charlie b
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I'm stealing that idea. Thanks, Charlie.
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Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Mon, Jul 16, 2007, 3:15pm (EDT-3) snipped-for-privacy@accesscom.com (charlieb) doth sayeth: <snip> Another less than obvious "holding device" is a bag of lead shot. <snip>
Gots no bags of lead shot, but got some smal lead ingos. You can wrap them in cloth if marring is a problem. They stack nicely too. You can make them from tire weights, printer lead, whatever scrap lead you can scrounge. Quite handy indeed.
JOAT I do things I don't know how to do, so that I might learn how to do them. - Picasso
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Mon, Jul 16, 2007, 3:15pm (EDT-3) snipped-for-privacy@accesscom.com (charlieb) doth sayeth: <snip> Another less than obvious "holding device" is a bag of lead shot. <snip>
Damn, hit send before I was ready.
You can also use bricks, but I'd definitely wrap 'em in cloth first. Personally I prefer the little lead ingots like use, but sometimes you've just got to use what you've got. I have used squares of wood on occassion, but you've usuall got to stack it high to get enough weight, and there's always te danger of knocking it over, and having to pick it up again.
JOAT I do things I don't know how to do, so that I might learn how to do them. - Picasso
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wrote:

As are chrome plated weightlifting plates.
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charlieb wrote:
| Another less than obvious "holding device" is a bag of lead shot. | At about a buck a pound, they're kind of handy for holding things | down and when stacked, holding things up. And they don't mark | the wood, or even if there's a finish on it. If you don't want to | keep it in bags then put it in a completely lock miter joined box | and add a handle. | http://web.hypersurf.com/~charlie2/LockMiter/LockMiterBox1.html
I sometimes fill Folgers plastic coffee "cans" with gravel. They don't mark the wood and the weight is easily adjustable. The "cans" have molded-in handles.
But they're much better at holding things down than they are at holding things up.
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/interest.html
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I sense a DAMHIKT in there, Morris...
mac
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mac davis wrote: | On Tue, 17 Jul 2007 04:21:28 -0500, "Morris Dovey"
| || charlieb wrote: || ||| Another less than obvious "holding device" is a bag of lead shot. ||| At about a buck a pound, they're kind of handy for holding things ||| down and when stacked, holding things up. And they don't mark ||| the wood, or even if there's a finish on it. If you don't want to ||| keep it in bags then put it in a completely lock miter joined box ||| and add a handle. ||| http://web.hypersurf.com/~charlie2/LockMiter/LockMiterBox1.html || || I sometimes fill Folgers plastic coffee "cans" with gravel. They || don't mark the wood and the weight is easily adjustable. The || "cans" have molded-in handles. || || But they're much better at holding things down than they are at || holding things up. | | I sense a DAMHIKT in there, Morris...
NBD. If I wanted 'em to hold something _up_, I'd fill 'em with concrete. Most of the stuff I work on in my shop is heavier than I'd set on top of a thin poly cylinder.
Just about everything in my shop that supports work will support at least triple my weight, and (neener) most of those work supports have wheels.
Sadly, only the saw has wings.
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto /
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Thanks! I've got hundreds of pounds of steel plate weights for Soap Box Derby cars (thus the nickname!) They range from 1/2# to 12# and I do use them as "counterbalances" on occasion, using a rag as cushion. I just have to be very careful not to drop them on the project, or my foot.
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-- Jorgenson F-clamps go on before Bessey F-clamps.
I've never used a Bessey F-clamp. Seen 'em though.
What's the major difference and why do the J's go on before the B's?
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Besseys aren't nearly as delicate. I actually used one as a prybar to jimmy a tiedown chain free from under a pile of demolition trash on a 63 Chevy flatbed, without bending it. Jorgensons are lighter, and easier to work with one hand while the other struggles to hold a stack of heavily glued 2" laminate plies together.
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