Too Freak'en cold

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On Sun, 4 Feb 2007 03:51:51 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

All depends on where you are- in my town, I still see the grade-school kids walking home on my way out to work every day, no matter how cold it is.
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Middle and High school has to be 1 mile or more to take the bus. I think it is half that for grade school. I see a lot of parents driving their kids short distances even in mild weather. Or waiting in the car until the bus comes. And on some routs, the bus stops at every damned house instead of making the kid group together to speed things up.
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Mon, Feb 5, 2007, 3:32am (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@snet.net (EdwinPawlowski) "Prometheus" doth sayeth: <snip> see a lot of parents driving their kids short distances even inmild weather. Or waiting in the car until the bus comes. <snip>
Actually I think that's not a bad idea, what with all the whack jobs out ther.
JOAT Only those who have the patience to do simple things perfectly will acquire the skill to do difficult things easily. - Johann Von Schiller
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wrote:

Lucky you that you live in an area where kids are still allowed to go to the local school.
Here (a subdivision) the bus stops at each interesection. Every morning I see at least two parents who live in the middle of the block sitting their in their cars waiting for the bus to cart Junior off.
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<...snipped...>

Ah, the good old days... I grew up in a small town in Pa that had a single jr high for the entire town & much of the surrounding area. It was 9 blocks, a little under a mile, from my house, & lots of kids I knew had to walk several blocks further. The Junior high had no cafeteria, so the lunch break was 1 1/2 hours, plenty of time for a 12 year old to get into trouble. We had the option at lunch time of walking home & back, walking to the High School about 6 blocks away to use the cafeteria there, or eating at one of several diners or sub shops within a few blocks of the school. One plus, the city transit bus was 15 cents for a minor, but man, that was a lot of money in those days. For 35 cents I could go to a Saturday matinee at one of the towns 2 movie theaters, and see a newsreel, cartoon, serial, and main feature, sometimes a double feature! I sometimes think about how my brother and friends and I, at the age of 8 or 9, used to walk or bicycle all over that area, probably within a range of 2 or 3 miles in any direction from our neighborhood. Today (living in Baltimore) I wouldn't let my 10 year old go 5 blocks from our house without an adult.
--
There is always an easy solution to every human problem -- neat,
plausible, and wrong." (Mencken)
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J T wrote:

The limit for bus rides was 1 mile. I lived one street too close. In Michigan my Michigan. Used to sit over the sewer vents on the way home to warm up a bit if the wind wasn't too bad.
Bill
--
Make yourself an honest man, and then you may be sure that there is one
rascal less in the world.
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My dad told me all that. Plus the fact that he was chased by bears too.
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Probably worth trottin' this one out again...
50 Fahrenheit (10C) --- Californians shiver uncontrollably, Canadians plant gardens.
35 Fahrenheit (1.6C) --- Italian cars won't start, Canadians drive with the windows down.
32 Fahrenheit (0C) --- American water freezes, Canadian water gets thicker.
0 Fahrenheit (-17.9C) --- New York City landlords finally turn on the heat, Canadians have the last barbecue of the season.
-60 Fahrenheit (-51C) --- Mt. St. Helens freezes, Canadians Girl Guides sell cookies door to door.
-100 Fahrenheit (-73C) --- Santa Claus abandons the North Pole, Ottawa opens the Rideau canal for skating.
-173 Fahrenheit (-114C) --- Ethyl alcohol freezes, Canadians get frustrated when they can't thaw the keg.
-460 Fahrenheit (-273C) --- Absolute zero; all atomic motion stops, Canadians start saying "cold, eh?"
-500 Fahrenheit (-295C) --- Hell freezes over, Toronto Maple Leafs win the Stanley Cup.
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On 03/02/2007 4:53 PM, Dude wrote:

You had socks?
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"Doug Payne" wrote

I remember one snowy morning when I was a kid walking to the bus stop. It was cold and windy. The bus was a little late and we were happy to get onto a heated bus. A short distance away, the bus got stuck. The driver was frantic. We told him to calm down. We would go home and get the tractor and pull him out.
We took our time, had a few snowball fights and eventually got the bus pulled out. The driver was still frantic and wanted us to leave the tractor at the neighbor's place. We said no. We returned the tractor to it's shelter.
When I eventually got to school, hours late, the principal met me and asked what happened. When I told him, he burst out laughing. When I asked him what was so funny, he said that I was the only seventh grade student he ever had that pulled out a big yellow school bus with the family tractor.
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Jump on the latest Chicken Little Bandwagon: "THE ICE AGE COMETH!"
Stoutman wrote:

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Yer all a pack of nancy boys. I live in the -40 capital of North America. I'd love it if the temp hit a balmy -10. It's currently -27 with an expected low of -34. Celcius.
Pete
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You Yanks have no real sense of cold , went into my workshop it is -40c did a little sanding had to give it up feet too cold . Bye the way I'm in central Can.
Sal

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I'd say many of us have more sense than to live in an area where it gets to -40C (or -40F for that matter, they are the same) on a regular basis. ;-)
Seems Wisconsin, Michigan, North Dakota tend to get to those temps pretty regularly during the winter.

+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
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On Sat, 03 Feb 2007 20:44:23 -0700, Mark & Juanita

Yep. It's not a matter of sense, though- it's a matter of what you're comfortable at. To my eternal dismay, the weather inists on getting hotter than 80 degrees (F) most summers. If I had my way, we'd have the -40 in the winter as a tradeoff for the temp never going above 65 in the summer.
If it makes any of you guys feel any better about your chilly 50* shops, I spent yesterday morning outside changing my wife's transmission gasket when it was -5. (At least, that is, until the car rolled off the jack and gave me a good smashing- there's a good "injury by dumbass" for you.) Evidently, it was so cold that the gasket froze and cracked. But it really was not so hard on me, because I'm used to the weather.
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I can empathize Stoutman. I've built a number of things in the gar, er shop when it was cold enough to see my breath. I finally broke down and bought a unit heater. I insulated the garage door and that baby keeps it as warm as I want it. Lately at night, when I do most of my work, it's been getting into the teens (and lower) and I'm toasty warm. I think it was around $400 off of Ebay (search for Dornback). Very similar to the Mr. Heater version but a lot cheaper. It works great! Cheers, cc

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Sat, Feb 3, 2007, 1:49pm (Stoutman) doth lament: Went out to do some woodworking on my bed project. I didn't last to long in the cold woodshop. Need a heater!
Yeah, tell me about it. I live a tad east of Raleigh. We've had snow twice this winter, and some of it even lasted until the next day even.
Uh huh, yeah, sure, right, cold. I was born and raised in Michigan, but stayed down here when I retired from the Army. It doesn't get COLD down here, just cool. And my mother seriously thinks I'd like to move back to Michigan. But it wasn't the weather that kept me from doing that, it was the people. Worst damn winters I ever spent were when I was at Ft Lee, VA. Never got lower than 32 degrees above zero farenheight, but the wind cut right thru anything you wore.
JOAT Only those who have the patience to do simple things perfectly will acquire the skill to do difficult things easily. - Johann Von Schiller
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Well, I've decided to brave the cold and open the shop today. Went out this am to find it at 11deg INSIDE. Turned the kero torpedo on, lit the radiant kero and headed out to split some fire wood. After 1/2 hour of splitting wood, I was STILL cold. Went into the shop to find it at a cozy 34deg. It actually felt pretty warm! Built a fire and let the heaters do their thing. I've found the best way to warm cold fingers is to grab a card scraper and get to work. Right now it's probably costing me about $2.00 a minute to keep it at 55deg, but I'm making progress on a table top I glued up yesterday! Hopefully the beer I left out there thaws out soon.....--dave

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Tip from a Canuckistani: after the beer thaws out, turn the bottle end- over-end a few times...gently. Then let sit for a couple of minutes and open it. It was explained to me once..something about specific gravity. It made sense and indeed it improves the taste after a freeze. I know a little something about frozen beer; I used to be an avid ice-fisherman (Sometimes I'd catch up to 30 pounds of ice!) but I stopped when arthritis set in and it became too difficult to chop a big enough hole in the ice for my boat to fit in. I still miss the sound of the sinker hitting the ice after a nice long cast....
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(snip) Tip from a Canuckistani: after the beer thaws out, turn the bottle end-

I've implemented your suggestion few times now with several different test samples. I've concluded the procedure is a success! Thanks! --dave
wrote:

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