Today's Hint - Don't do things like this

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> Sounds like you might want to talk to a lawyer. At the minimum, if I were in

I tuned into this thread a bit late, but perhaps I can be of some help. As an optometrist, I can at least shed some light on the problem with the lens--which appears to have broken due to impact, if I'm extrapolating correctly--or at least with why it didn't protect the eye. Please feel free to inquire.
As to seeking legal help, that should be a last resort effort. As soon as you retain an attorney, any cooperation between the doctor and the patient evaporates, by instruction from the doctor's lawyer. Most problems can be worked out without dragging the issue into a legal environment.

Contrary to popular belief, safety glasses really provide very little protection against impacts of significant velocity and/or mass. At best they will keep flying particles and tiny objects out of the wearer's eyes, but are limited in effect with respect to heavy objects flying at significant velocities. Crown glass safety lenses are really no better than CR-39 hard resin (plastic) lenses made for non-safety glasses, and most likely worse. The best lenses are polycarbonate, but their ability to resist significant impact is limited by the ability of the frame to hold the lens in place without releasing the lens or collapsing under the impact. Polycarbonate generally won't break or shatter. And you are correct w/r/t goggles--they offer superior eye protection. So do polycarbonate face shields.

Fine advice.
Max
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That was a good read Maxprop, thanks.
--

Greg


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Maxprop wrote:

clearing the chunks at the beginning. I was trimming a bunch of poplar 2x2's and got tired of moving the scraps off the table. After all they were just sitting there. Then one jiggled just far enough for the rear tooth of the blade to toss it at me. I tend to have a little retroactive amnesia whenever something like this happens so the next thing I remember was holding one hand over the damaged eye and looking for the glasses with the other eye. Found the glasses, picked up the lens pieces and went for a ride. Joe
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Joe Gorman wrote:

As I read in a library table saw book, use compressed air to blow those babies off the back of the saw. It's fast & easy.
This is the primary reason I find myself looking at the HF compressors each Sunday on my way home after church. ;-)
-- Mark
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What material were the lenses, Joe?
As I mentioned earlier, polycarbonate is the only true safety lens. For future reference, insist on polycarb for any pair of glasses you wish to use with activities that have the potential for flying objects. And no rimless or semi-rimless frames, either. A good, solid plastic or metal eyewire surrounding the lens is an absolute necessity for holding the lens in place.
Max
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Maxprop wrote:

filing scraping or burning? Joe
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Believe it or not the way we determine glass vs. plastic is to tap them gently against a tooth. If the resulting sound is a bright "click" they're glass. If the sound is a dull "clack" they're plastic. Obviously if they're in pieces they weren't polycarb. I've seen polycarb lenses that have been placed in a vise and shot with a .22 caliber round at close range. The bullet distorted the lens by about an inch, but failed to penetrate. No breakage either.
Max
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RonB wrote:

Just thought I'd mention that it is umwise to feed short lengths of wood (prunings from cutting bowl blanks that had a very rough de-horning prior to planing) into the planer if they have a deep dish in the top side. Not even if they have absolutely gorgeous grain that it would be criminal to waste.
They start to feed in, then halt because they are past the first feed roller but not yet to the second.
Then they make a large BANG! sound when you push them into the blades with a push stick. If you keep trying, it is possible for them to get small enough to fly out backwards at speeds approaching the speed of light ... well, I never saw it move, but my knuckle recorded the fact.
DAMHIKT
Bills 5th Law of Woodworking: Wood entering the electric planer must already be flat.
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