Titebond III for Exterior

I know that TB III is waterproof. But will it stand up to freeze/thaw cycles in an exterior application? I have a 75" brick opening in which I am going to replace a patio door, which requires a 72" RO.
I am going to tear out the nasty-looking framing in there now, and redo it with some nice poplar. I was thinking of taking 2 1"x8" by poplar boards and putting a nice graduated routed edge on each of them, and then gluing them together, such that I'd have 1.5" on each side of the opening, bringing it down to 72".
Will the glue hold the pieces together? Of course I'll tack and screw them as well, but I want them to look like one piece with no separation. The area is covered by a large overhang, so it only gets splashed rain from the patio, hardly ever direct rain.
Should I consider a polyurethane glue instead?
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Buck Turgidson wrote:

For that it will probably be fine. I'm assuming it will then be painted? If so, the color shouldn't be an issue.
I'm not that enamored w/ poplar as the wood choice, though. Even if there isn't any direct water exposure, I'm assuming this is in contact w/ the cement patio and poplar isn't very good at all for moisture resistance.
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Yes, painted white. Anything else, other than poplar, like oak? I looked at pressure treated, but it was waaay too rough and gnarly, even the #1 grade lumber.
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Buck Turgidson wrote:

Pine, fir would be my first choice. If there's a section against concrete or masonry that could be covered w/ moulding, I'd strongly consider a 1x treated for that w/ a surface finish layer for the interior/visual portion(s)...
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Poly would set stronger to concrete due to moisture content. I rebuilt a cellar window case with Elmer's Pro-Bond poly ten years ago, and it's as good as the day I glued it in.
Would solvent (not water!) based Liquid Nails work?
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The glue aside, poplar would be close to the bottom of my list for an exterior opening.
Pete Stanaitis ----------------------
Buck Turgidson wrote:

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What would be at the top?
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Buck Turgidson wrote:

Greenheart Teak Black locust Redwood Western red cedar
or, take your pick... http://www.tis-gdv.de/tis_e/misc/holzart.htm
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dadiOH
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Preprimed fascia board.
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wrote:

Same here.
I'd probably use a plastic trim "board", white oak (not red), cedar, or some other suitable wood for exterior trim. Poplar doesn't stand up to weather or bugs well at all.
If it's painted, I really like the plastic exterior millwork.
--------------------------------------------- ** http://www.bburke.com/woodworking.html ** ---------------------------------------------
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