Titanium Carbide?

I just bought a Freud blade that says it is made with Titanium Carbide, rather than tungsten carbide. I did a google search and found it does exist, but information is spotty. Is this actually something new, or just a meaningless marketing scheme?
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On Fri, 10 Nov 2006 23:05:27 +0000, Toller wrote:

Don't know about its use in a cutting edge, but it SHOULD be a doozy.
I worked in a die shop and TC was the plating we used when TN was not up to the job.
Googling for "titanium carbide" produced this as the second entry: http://www.ppm.bc.ca/tic.htm
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Not new, but not just marketing stuff either.
Carbide, all by itself, isn't all that useful. It can be used as a lapping compound (not quite as hard as diamond but pretty close). But, it doesn't look metalic or stick together like you see on saw blades and router bits. All by itself it's an extremely brittle crumbly material.
The titanium, tungsten, cobalt, chromium, etc. are referred to as the "binder" and are used to "glue" the carbide grains together. Essentially, powdered carbide is mixed with the powdered metal binder. They are then subjected to extreme heat and pressure. The result is the familiar metallic thing we are all accustomed to seeing on the tips of saw blades or router bits. It gets sharpened with a diamond wheel.
Different grades of carbide are created using different ratios of carbide to binder, various sizes of carbide grains, different pressures and temperatures, and other additives. In general carbides range from extremely hard and wear resistant (but brittle): ISO class C1, to extremely impact resistant (but soft): ISO class C8. Most woodworking tools use C2 and C3 carbides. These are also suitable for working soft non-ferrous metals (aluminum, copper, brass, etc.) and cast iron. C6 and C7 grades are most often used for machining ferrous metals (steel). Grades C7 C8 get used for masonry (rock drilling, etc.).
Titanium is just a different binder than tungsten. It shouldn't be confused with the coating which is often put on cutting tools. Titanium Nitride is the vapor deposited coating with the gold appearance. It makes the surface very hard and very smooth. It is just a surface treatment, not part of the carbide. It can be applied to steel, cast iron, etc.
Hop it helps.
Ed Bennett snipped-for-privacy@ts-aligner.com http://www.ts-aligner.com
Toller wrote:

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Thanks for taking the time to explain it; I never knew any of that.
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Thanks for the corrections. You are absolutely right. A while back (1999) I did a whole bunch of research on this topic (Micro-100 is about two miles from my home). I ended up posting a summary in an article here in the wreck:
http://groups.google.com/group/rec.woodworking/msg/252d7021297c1e02?hl=en &
When I typed this response it was off the top of my head, trying to remember things that I learned 7 years ago. I just should have looked up the old message and posted a link. Thanks for putting the info right.
Ed Bennett snipped-for-privacy@ts-aligner.com http://www.ts-aligner.com
J. Clarke wrote:

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