time from growing a tree till you can use it.

If one was to plant some trees for use with woodworking later in life, what timeframe would i be looking at then?
Ofcourse it depends on the type of tree, and for what application. When is the best time to harvest a tree in general?
The time to dry/prepare the tree should be included, which can take.. up to 4 years?
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Walnut 100 years. There is an Iranian proverb to answer your question: Others planted and we ate, we will plant and others will eat.
Your question

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what
I sure hope you are very young. I planted some trees 20 years ago. A maple was about 5 feet tall when it went into the ground. It probably has another 20 years to yield a few boards worth cutting from it. An oak that was planted when the house was built in 1978 would probably give me enough wood to build a dog house. Ed
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Poplar and jummy wood is your best options if you are young.
Wes
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Whiskey Echo Sierra Sierra AT Gee Tee EYE EYE dot COM
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wrote:

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Depends on the growing condition too. The squirrels stole black walnuts that we had gathered and planted a few, I was surely in school by then so let's place a lower age bound of 8 meaning 1966 or so, cut the tree down just after my dad died in 1993. So, at a guess the tree was 27 years old and there was a good eight foot log probably 16-18 inches through at the small in. Plus another -skinner- log off the top of that. The tree was growing between our garage and the neighbors (not to mention under a large maple) so it went up pretty straight to start off. Having to reach for light helps.
I would think you could grow your own good wood in 25-30 years.
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snipped-for-privacy@lycos.com wrote in message wrote:

...

What is jummy wood?
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Thanks for asking. I've been watching for over 2 years and haven't figured it out yet. Now for an answer------.
On 16 Nov 2003 07:04:22 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (woodstrapper) wrote:

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"Lawrence A. Ramsey" wrote:

Pine, named after a "Wrecker" by the name of Jim McNamara who seemed to use pine exclusively. See:
http://www.google.com/groups?q=jummywood+origin+group:rec.woodworking&hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&selm=gh7B7.13099%24vP3.4064216246%40newssvr16.news.prodigy.com&rnum=1
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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Cool!
wrote:

http://www.google.com/groups?q=jummywood+origin+group:rec.woodworking&hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&selm=gh7B7.13099%24vP3.4064216246%40newssvr16.news.prodigy.com&rnum=1
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On Sun, 16 Nov 2003 15:22:12 -0600, Lawrence A. Ramsey

Speakin of Jums,,,,anyone seen him as of late?
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Yep! He sent me the email explaining Jummywood I believe.
On Mon, 17 Nov 2003 04:23:44 -0600, Traves W. Coppock <newsgroups-AT-farmvalleywoodworks-DOT-com> wrote:>On Sun, 16 Nov 2003 15:22:12 -0600, Lawrence A. Ramsey

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Traves W. Coppock <newsgroups-AT-farmvalleywoodworks-DOT-com> wrote:

Rumor mill has it he's just "pine-ing away".
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Pine.
wrote:

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If you are content with small pieces (the thickness of a finger) you can have them grown in one year from the seed. Best time to harvest is between Christmass und new year (or any other time in the dead of winter), when there is the minimum of sap in the wood, some people even thing that tha phase of the moon should be considered.
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mailto: snipped-for-privacy@physik.uni-bonn.de Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869
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Nope, huggers aside, you have to cut a tree that's there. Neat thing is, before the one you cut down was so big, there used to be twenty in the same space. Let it go, and you can get ten small ones in your lifetime for other use, and the next generation can get lumber.
Or you can "protect" it until it dies and "preserve" the forest and nobody gets anything.

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Depends on the tree species, soil and care in growing. Like herbicides, fertilizer to get them going, pruning, etc. Looking at 30-40 years for cherry if lucky; walnut longer. Plus you have to pay taxes, buy insurance, worry about drought, disease, fire, etc.. I can give you all the pine, popular, cypress saw logs you want at 10 years; they will be soft because they grew so fast. But it can be done because I have done it.

In the middle of the winter, Why? Sap is at it's lowest point; bark won't slip so easily.

content on tree (remember? when you cut it?)

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I've been cutting quite a few trees lately, clearing some woods for a new house. All of the wood will be going *back* into the house - some as cabinets and furniture, some as braces and beams for the timber frame, and the rest will go into the outdoor woodburning furnace. Even the tops will become mulch.
Anyway - I've been counting rings as I cut. The largest cherry I harvested yielded one log 26" dia by 8 ft, one log 22" dia x 14 ft, two logs 16" dia x 8 ft. The tree was about 60 years old. A hard maple, only 14" at the base, was the same age. One ash tree was nearly the same size as the cherry and was only 37 years old.
So, if you want to use it yourself, and you're young, plant poplar, pine, maybe ash, and other fast growing species. if you want your kids or grandkids to benefit - plant everything else. My dad has a stand of hard maple, the largest of which would barely yield a 14" saw log, and they have never seemed to get any larger since I was a little kid (I'm 33). I'd suspect that by the time I retire, I might be able to cut some for lumber. In the meantime, I am cultivating a 10 acre stand of eastern white pine, which is going to yield enough timber for my house and a shop building just from what has matured since 1974, when it was last harvested. Every year, I'll cut two or three of the largest trees for the following year's lumber.
Jon E

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Depends on your local conditions and the tree. Most hardwoods will be 50-70 years old before providing useful timber. Look at pines or eucalypts for fast growth. Here in NZ we harvest Pinus Radiata after 25 years or so, I think it's known as Monterey or Sugar Pine in the USA. I also have some Eucalypt Nitens and E. Fastiga that's about 10 years old that would be usable for timber.
Barry Lennox
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Different trees grow at different rates. Some maples grow quite fast. My father has a maple in his front yard that was planted in the mid 80's. It's about 30 feet high now and and the trunk is about 10" across at the base. It is growing slower as it gets larger so it is probably at least 10 years away from yielding any usable lumber and even then it would probably only yield a few planks.
Last weekend I was camping and there was a tree in the campsite that had fallen. The park rangers had cut the trunk even about 3' off the ground. The cross section was about 18" across, not sure what type of tree it was but pretty sure it wasn't an oak or maple. Anyway, my nephew and I decided to count the rings to determine the age. It was about 80 years old, give or take about 5 years. Even at that age it wouldn't have yielded too many planks.
So I guess it depends on how old you are and how long you live. But go ahead and plant it anyway. Better yet, plant one for your kids. I planted two trees when my daughter was born (or rather they grew on their own in my yard and I transplanted them somewhere safe). They are now in a remote part of a state park where years from now I can show my daughter "her trees."
-Chris
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