Thoughts on this Milwaukee Router Kit?

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(Amazon.com product link shortened)52610853&sr=1-1
Bill
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I find the 1.75 HP Milwaukee a bit 'buzzy'. It vibrates. The 2.25 is much better and is variable speed. But, having said that, that sure is a good price.
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I bought this unit earlier this year. Have only used it once, but am impressed at the value. A little weighty compared to my PC690, but at that price you can't go wrong.
Bill wrote:

(Amazon.com product link shortened)52610853&sr=1-1
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Bill wrote:

(Amazon.com product link shortened)52610853&sr=1-1
Even if all you do is use it as a paper weight, at that price it is a winner.
Lew
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I believe you. I have a question now about its variable speed bigger cousin (Milwaukee 5616-24, 2 1/4 hp), is the speed controlled in a way that would be useful in a router table, or is it trigger controlled" like on a variable speed drill? I should probably get the first one, I just want to avoid a coulda-woulda-shoulda...
Thanks, Bill
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"Bill" wrote:

IMHO, 2-1/4 HP is not an optimum choice for a table router.
The 5625 would be a better choice.
You want the biggest baddest router you can afford in a table.
Also, you need to be able to set max RPM at 10,000 max for use with bits above 1" in diameter.
Trying to swing a large panel bit above 10,000 RPM is not only scary, it is down right dangerous as well as exceeding bit manufacturer's max RPM spec.
Being able to set RPM to match cutter is a big plus for a table router.
If I were in the market, I buy two(2) kits for less than $210 and leave one with a fixed base and the other with the plunge base on a permanent basis.
Saves a lot of hassle.
The table router comes later.
HTH
Lew
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Actually, the 2-1/4 HP Milwaukee would do a good job in a table. EXCEPT when swinging big horizontal panel bits. Then again, I quite like the vertical panel bits. I always felt that a big fat horizontal panel bit belongs in a shaper, not a router.... of any size.
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AMEN, brother! Can I get a witness??
I couldn't agree more with what he said. Those 3" bits are too damn scary to put in a router, and I don't believe that routers were ever made specifically to spin those, no matter what model, make, HP or anything else they have. Just because you can, doesn't mean it is a good idea.
My life with panel cuts became a very calm place when I found the cousins to this bit several years ago and hooked it up to my 3hp DeWalt:
http://www.newwoodworker.com/reviews/infvertpnlbitrvu.html
These bits work like a champ, and I am not worried one bit about the lateral stresses on my router ruining bearings compared to those winged devils.
Note in the link above they make it a POINT to test with a 2 1/4 hp router. They even have pic results of cutting through a knot.
I have a Milwaukee router, and plenty of other Miwaukee tools. Not a dud in the bunch.
Keep your original packaging, try out the router and send it back if you don't like it. With that price.... I don't know how hard I would resist if I was in the market for a router.
Robert
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I run them at the absolute lowest speed in my Makita 3612C (9,000 RPM) and it's still scary.

The trouble is, with those bits you can't cut profiles in arched panel doors...
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than you'd be if you were happy and your wife was unhappy." - Red Green
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People still make those? *smirk*
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Robatoy wrote:

Really incredibly *cool* people do, yeah. :-)
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Repeat after me:
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wrote:

That would make me incredibly uncool, but I like raised panel doors. I am not too keen on old-style-religious-type icon/rectory-window shapes. No place for that 'look' in a kitchen. I'm not a huge fan of oak in a kitchen for the same reason. Leave oak and ash for pews. But that is why God made so many different trees.... something for everybody.
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wrote:

And they can not back cut the panel like some horizonal bits do.
I basically have no problem with large horizonal bits spinning at 10,000, all is quiet and relaxed. BUT you do have to be extra careful as there is a lot of exposed bit, especially if doing arched doors when the fence is not hiding half of the bit.
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wrote:
My life with panel cuts became a very calm place when I found the cousins to this bit several years ago and hooked it up to my 3hp DeWalt:
http://www.newwoodworker.com/reviews/infvertpnlbitrvu.html
These bits work like a champ, and I am not worried one bit about the lateral stresses on my router ruining bearings compared to those winged devils.
I have yet to use one of the vertical bits, do you still make several passes at increasing depths to the desired cutting depth? And if you do, do you make the passes at different bit depth settings or different fence settings?
I spin the large bits now but would not mind going smaller to achieve the same goal. I would especially appreciate not having to change bases to accomidate the 3" bits when all my panels have straight edges.
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You can back-cut the bevel on the router table, either vertically or horizontally, just not the at the same time. I take several passes. The last one being a light one. Try a good quality one, Leon, I think you will like it.
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wrote:
You can back-cut the bevel on the router table, either vertically or horizontally, just not the at the same time.
Yeah, that is what I do. The back cutter bits can only be adjusted by moving the fence, not by raising the bit. ;~)
I take several passes. The last one being a light one. Try a good quality one, Leon, I think you will like it.
Do you adjust the fence or raise the bit?
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I have a tall fence that slides on my normal fence and I adjust it to take small bites. I do not have a router-lifter... so raising the bit is a PITA. Of course, now I would take a different approach with a specialty insert bit for the CNC. Ordering doors is soooo much easier.
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I have a tall fence that slides on my normal fence and I adjust it to take small bites. I do not have a router-lifter... so raising the bit is a PITA. Of course, now I would take a different approach with a specialty insert bit for the CNC.
Ordering doors is soooo much easier.
Yeah but I like making doors. It is therapeutic for me, working in the shop with out too many details to consider.
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wrote:

I tend to do a mix of both, as it allows me to not be fussy about setting anything up at the start. However the last finishing pass should be done moving the fence, at least for a cove profile. You basically aren't removing any material anymore at the bottom (edge of the panel) if you raise the bit because the profile is basically straight there, so it would only be cleaning up the upper 2/3s or so of the profile.
I use them to do an edge treatment on box tops more than for panels.
-Kevin
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"Robatoy" wrote:
------------------------------------------- Actually, the 2-1/4 HP Milwaukee would do a good job in a table. EXCEPT when swinging big horizontal panel bits. --------------------------------------------------
I approach a router/table package in facilities planning mode.
IOW, what is the Maximum capacity that may be req'd.
Using those big panel bits is out right scary, but sometimes it is the only choice, thus the recommendation to have a table/router package engineered to do the biggest job.
Lew
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