Thought regarding DW735 planer

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arw01 wrote: (snip)

dust collector connected to it. During one session of planing white oak, when I turned off the planer, the bag on the dust collector deflated which I thought was odd. Turns out I had forgotten to turn the DC on, but the blower on the DW735 was so strong, it went through the 4" hose and impeller, blowing the bag on the DC up as though it was on. I was impressed.
David
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That is a nice feature on that model. You can simply run a hose to a trash can and by pass filling the DC.
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Yes initially it is. I believe however that that is going to be short lived relative speeking considering the life of the planer.

If you have not nicked a blade yet, you are probably have not done much planing yet when compairing the true life expentency of the blades. Planer blades get nicks and there is no way around that. These nicks are not a problem and are to be expected but as this normal cycle happens the quality of the finish that you are seeing now will be gone. And you are right, there is no rule that you have to turn all the knives at the same time but why do that. The improved finish will be short lived again. IMHO uee the thickness planer for thicknessing not finishing.

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I've been using a DW735 w/disposable blades for the past six months. I'm still on the original blades. So far I've planned about 25 rough sawn planks of Mesquite that measure six feet by 13 inches wide and one inch thick from a lumber yard in Arizona. Granted I don't take very much off per pass, just enough to get it smooth on each side and I've not had any problems with chipout which can be a problem on Mesquite.
rnjphoto
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IMHO you haven't used a DW735. I've had mine for about 15 months now, and there is a *definite* difference in surface quality between the high and low speeds.

Now I'm *sure* you don't have a DW735. I found this to be a big problem with the DeWalt's predecessor in my shop (Delta 22-560), where even *honing* those skinny little blades made them too narrow to be usable. But that just isn't an issue with the DW735.
Although the blades are supposed to be disposable, there's enough metal there to allow for a few resharpenings, as long as you don't too heavy-handed with it. I use a Tormek grinder, followed by lapping the back sides of the knives on #400 wet-or-dry paper laid on a glass plate, so I'm removing only a few thousandths each time. And I'm still on the original set of knives.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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wrote:

I have absolutely no doubt Doug that the finish out of my planer would put the finish out of my planer to shame. I would not however use either finsih as the final finish. I am going to scrape or sand regardless of what comes out of either planer. When your planer blade gets a nick that wonderful finish is gone and switching blades or moving blades to try to eleminate that ridge that will show up is a waste of time since scraping or sanding will remove the ridge effotlessly while scraping or sanding the final surface. The slow seed IHMO is at least an extra step to planing or more time consuming when planing.

No I do not have that planer but am compairing to my OLD Ryobi AP 10 planer that I have had since 1989. I have resharpened the blades 10 or so times. The blades on this planer are between 3/32 and 1/8" thick and about 1" from the back to the cutting edge with plenty of sharpenings left.

I use the same sharpener. I find it dificult to remove much material off my blades at all using the planer blade jig. The knives that came with my planer are bimetal. I guess that is what you would call them. ;~) If you look very closely you can see that the cutting edge a seperate material. It is about 1/4" front to back and about 1/2 the thickness of the whole knife blade. I will easily be able to use all of the cutting edge material as the knives have enough in mounting adjustment.
I actually would probably go with Dewalt's latest and greatest if my next planer is another portable. I am simply not sold on the 2 speed feature as being one that will be of benefit through the whole life of the blade. Small nicks in a blade are of no matter to me as the ridge in the wood surface gets sanded off during finish sanding. So for me, the slower finer planer speed would be a waste of time. It is not going to prevent me from having to finish sand for a couple of minutes after running a board through the planer.
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I don't use that as the final finish, and I do scrape or sand afterward. But I have noted that there is less scraping and sanding needed if the final pass is a light cut at the slow speed.
And from my perspective, having had hand surgery twice in the last 8 months, anything that reduces the amount of scraping and sanding I need to do is a Good Thing. :-)
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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I hear you... In all seriousness, Have you ever used the PC SpeedBloc? This sander is sooooo smooth and raises a cloud of dust. I sanded a bunch of small pieces with this sander last weekend and I held the sander at a 90 degree angle with one hand and held the pieces that I was sanding with the other hand. I did this for about 2 hours straight and never had a hint of strain to the hand holding the sander. I have had this sander since 1989.
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Leon wrote:

From a general use standpoint I agree that sanding or scaping should be done post planing. When the blades dull some you will get some nicks in the wood and it is probably better to scrape them out vs taking another layer of wood off.
Where I find the 2 speeds critically different is in highly figured woods. Birdseye maple used to tear out horribly with my old Delta 22-540 12" planer. With the new Dewalt, on the slower speed, there is minimal tearout if any at all. Additionally, in very hard woods, my single speed Delta used to leave waves of ripples that needed scraped and sanded out. Given that it was on all of the boards run through, it meant a considerable amount of time, so slowing the speed down and running a final pass is well worth the time.
David
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Well that sounds like a valid point. Although I plane a lot of Ipe and do not have a wave or ripple problem with my old Ryobi planer. I does however have the old style resharpenable blades.
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Leon wrote:

I had the tearout problem with brand new blades and when they had been resharpened with my old Delta.
I am curious as to what you plane the IPE for. I am in the process of completing my deck with IPE. Absolutely love the look on the deck. I bought enough extra to make some benches and other things so I am curious for ideas. My wife wants me to build a bench for our shower out of IPE, but I am not sure. I guess with a waterproof glue it would be OK. My understanding from some people that work with it on decks is that doesn't finish well after being sanded. Any tips on gluing and finishing? Your thoughts would be appreciated. Now I have to run out back and get a few pieces to plane down some.
David
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Wood magazine, June/July 2004 has a simple garden bench that is sized for decking material. I built one in a couple of easy weekends. With the leftovers I made a couple of matching tables. They were also posted on abpw last year or I you can see them on my web page, under woodworking, of course. -- Ed http://pages.cthome.net/edhome /
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I need to end up with pieces that are 3/8" thick. I generally buy Ipe rough cut that is 1" thick. I resaw it on my TS and end up with 2 bieces tha can be planed down to 3/8" thick.
I am in the process of

I have never finished Ipe but have tried some shellac on it.
Ipe really does not need to be finished.
Any tips on gluing and finishing? Your thoughts would be appreciated.
Additionally I have built a BBQ pit shelf with Ipe and rebuilt 3 park bench style benches. The benches had 12 or 13 pieces 1-1/2" wide strips that formed the seat and back. The ends were cast iron. After sanding, Ipe holds it smooth finish and splinters are no longer a problem. I have had pretty good luck using polyurethane glue.
Something to think about though, I turned a 1"x1"x8" piece of Ipe on the lather and sanded it on the lathe. With a paper towel I applied Minwax Finishing Wax to the spinning spindle and 2 years later the piece retains a nice satin finish. Basically sanded to 220 or more and waxed the Ipe has a very nice deep color with that hand rubbed look that is as hard as a rock. I think I would not worry with a finish at all except for a little wax.
Play with it, use a fine grit sand paper and try some wax.
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Leon wrote:

I think for indoor applications the wax is a great idea but I am not sure how the wax would weather outside. I will say that I put an edge treatment on the endgrain (Anchorseal) to stop the splitting and there have been no ill effects to the wax in the rain or snow. Outdoors, I will do either unfinished or MESSMER'S U.V. PLUS for Hardwoods Natural wood finish. Primary reason for this is to minimize the greying of the wood with UV protection. As I understand it, the Ocean City Boardwalk was installed using IPE 25 years ago. I went to look at it last summer and it looks great. Doesn't begin to show wear.
Wonder how a waxed finished bench would do in a shower. I would expect that leaving it unfinished would be the best thing.
I expect for the deck I will end up making 3 - 4 benches and a few side tables. We also are going to build a 14' X 14' platform out of IPE to put one of the nice 12' X 12' Gazebo's Costco sells. For this I expect a larger table will be requested.
I'm sure this would make some beautiful pens.
I will do some tests and let you know. Thanks for the guidance.
David
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Yeah, the finish would simply be for appearance and not protection. Ipe reportedly will last out doors for 50 + years with no finish.

The wax will probably not help any at all. I will simply add a shiune to the surface. IMHO the Ipe will hold its color indoors out of sun light. Put a piece in the shower and see how it holds up. Be sure to sand it first.

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Tim Douglass wrote:

Another option if you have a Woodcraft near you, they have 10% off everything in the store days. Now that is not as good from a price standpoint as the refurbished model, but you will be getting a brand new one. I have a card from my Woodcraft for 10% off everything in the store on February 24.
I personally don't mind the fact that a machine has been refurbished. When refurbished you are guaranteed that a person has looked at your specific machine and signed off on it being ok. Brand new one's come off assembly lines and only get checked randomly. From my understanding, most returns are from people that only want to use a machine one time or decided they didn't need it, but since the box was opened, it cannot be sold as new.
BTW, I upgraded to the 735 from a Delta 22-540 and it is work the entire $499. This planer with it's dual speed and the 3 blades makes a huge difference in the quality of cut. The dust collection works great as well. I always had a problem with my Delta even with an aftermarket dust collection option. I was able to put highly figured wood through with no noticeable tearout. On my Delta, it would have ruined the wood.
David
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the problem with buying it locally is the sales tax kills the discount. Right now on Amazon, there is a $25 off sale if you spend $199. Couple that with a $30 discount if you open a credit card and no shipping and that over 105 off. max

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max wrote:

the state tax rate. Given a person has a need for a credit card and it has a decent rate, I guess the $30 would be worth it, but to just open an account to then pay interest on the purchase or to pay it off immediately and just close the account doesn't seem worth $30 to me.
Check out my other post at the bottom of this thread, a place in Seattle has the DW735 for $379. I have no affiliation with them, just searching today for replacement blades and saw the price. Looks like a mis-qoute to me, but if someone could get them to honor it, that would be a great deal. Not sure what they charge for shipping.
I also recommend the rolling stand made for this. It has the lever style pedal mechanism that allow the unit to roll easily. I mounted the pedal under the unit so it doesnt get in my way. That another $100 as I remember, but worth the investment if you like your tools mobile.
David
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You can bet it's a *chunk*. That sucker weighs around a hundred pounds. "Portable" planer my @$$ !
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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[snip]

Several years ago I was buying a circular saw at the local DeWalt outlet. I don't remember the prices, but there were two options. A full-price "new" one in a yellow box and a considerably lower priced "refurb" in a plain white box.
The sales guy told me that the saws were identical, carried the same warranty and were in fact both "new." The refurbishment occurred at the factory when for some reason or another the item failed a production line inspection and was sent off-line for rework.
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