This is so cool! A 'safety' table saw that detects your finger.

Page 6 of 10  


--
Alex -- Replace "nospam" with "mail" to reply by email. Checked infrequently.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

My mistake. Occasionally, I've been accused of being too serious. I guess this is one of those times.
You've got to include the emoticons for me to at least have a chance of laughing. :-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

Ahh. The words that come from an open mind. Not getting hurt using a TS and proper technique is the easy part. It's the untontrollable variables that come into play that cause accidents.

Perhaps as production ramps up and or the consumer demands better safety devices from the companies that are waiting to see what happens with the SawStop the competitive pricing will make it more affordable to every one. I cut 1/2 my thumb off in 1989. My insurance covered a majority of the expense but I have had to adapt as you have. My accident happened after I completed the cut and turned the saw off, and began removing the rip fence. Every one that knew me could not believe that I had an accident. It all happened so fast and at a time that you would not dream that something like this could happen. For months I thought that I'd had a kick back but until I almost had the accident again about 1 year later I never knew what had happened exactly. I had been into serious woodworking about 10 years.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The reality is that now that the technology is commercially available it will be difficult to legally defend an employer who doesn't take advantage of it to protect employees from the certainty that accidents happen. And insurance risk managers will be mandating it, if they are not already doing so.
So, in effect, even if some don't want it, they may not have really a choice ... a slick position for the patent holder.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 12/13/05
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

I totally agree and apparently so does Robin Lee.

I have never been one that thinks that having to buy something that you do not want is a good idea however this technology is really a good idea. For me personally I see this working out exactly the same way that seat belts, air bags, grounded electrical appliances, the "over the blade" TS guard, the guard on circle saws, the odor added to natural gas, break away hoses on filling station gas pumps, and most any other safety modification all came into existance.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Swingman wrote:

advantage of it to protect employees from the certainty that accidents happen. And insurance risk managers will be mandating it, if they are not already doing so.
So, in effect, even if some don't want it, they may not have really a choice ... a slick position for the patent holder. <<
Sage words, indeed. As a veteran business man yourself, you KNOW this is coming sooner or later. I don't think it is around the corner, but soon. And the inventor will profit accordingly until the Chiwanese come up with their own reverse engineered version.
Many years ago I was totally annoyed by the fact that some circular saw makers decided to put blade brakes on their saws. I was pissed off a the fact that the saw would jerk so hard at the end of the cut it would yank itself around on the work. I understood the intent a lot better after having the blade guard hang open while cutting some splintery stuff. I set the saw down and it skittered across the concrete and rolled over my foot. Going to fast, it didn't do anything but scare the living crap out of me. In my mind at that point it was clear why someone would want a blade brake. They still aren't prevalent, but most manufacturers at least off a circular saw with the blade brake.
Look at miter saws - I think they all have blade brakes now. No telling how many digits have been saved by that introduction. And cordless drills - does anyone make one anymore that doesn't? I wonder how many injuries have been averted by those?
The good news is that we still have a choice. Anyone can do anything that they want with their saw right now, and I am sure that when they are widely introduced that it will be mandatory for the civil rights militia to immediately figure out and post instructions on how to defeat the system. Much like some used to roll up their seatbelts and stick them in the separation of the bench to back inside the car.
Then their lives can go on unfettered by another safety device that was obviously designed for someone else.
Robert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sorta, Used, with out the feature will be around for a while.
Snip

You never think it could happen to you,,,, until it does. Where have whe heard that before. ;~)

I'd like to see a muffer added to these saws. Damn they are loud.

Remember back in the mid 70's when the new cars would not start untill the belt was buckled?

Obviously. ;~)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

You'd probably have sold the saw by then since you couldn't afford to keep replacing the blade and stop. You know that, even assuming the blade and stop only cost $250 total to replace, you could buy almost *4* whole new tablesaws?
You could make your shop look like Norm's for that! ;)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

Well lets see here. WWII on sale $100. New Cartridge IIRC $80. $180 x 30 = $5400. You cannot buy 2 new SawStop cabinet saws for that. Screw the new saw. You cannot replace a finger for that. I guess it has a lot to do with what your priorities are.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 02 Mar 2006 23:43:35 GMT, "Leon"

Out of curiosity, Leon, a few weeks ago you were speaking highly of Powermatic's new table saw, which lacks this safety feature. Have you changed your mind?
--
Chuck Taylor
http://home.hiwaay.net/~taylorc/contact /
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No not at all. There are several great products out there on the market. Each has it strong points and each deserves a fair shake in the area that it may excel. Unlike the SawStop the Powermatic 2000 does not have the blade stop technology however it unlike many originally American branded saws does have a riving knife like the SawStop. Sooo this may be a first step of the competition taking a second look at SawStops lead with a saw with more safety features. With that said, I am absolutely not saying that the SawStop is the do all beat all final word in table saws. I do however think that if the SawStop is not your cup of tea to not bash the product and technology because of what you may or may not think of the company that is marketing it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've seen people bash the company marketing it, but not the product and technology. The only negative comment I've seen on the product is that it's over-priced, which in all fairness is true.
The company marketing it, OTOH, deserves what bashing they get, IMO.
--
Talking about art is like dancing about architecture - Frank Zappa

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 03 Mar 2006 03:36:14 GMT, "Leon"

Does the riving knife on the Powermatic remove easily so you can use a dado blade? Or have they gone all European and shortened the arbor so you can't even use a stacked dado?
I really like the idea of a riving knife, but I do a lot of dados too.
Oh, I'm also pretty unconcerned about the SawStop until they start mandating it. Probably works great, but the only times I've even come close have been during coast-down, when it wouldn't make any difference anyway.
-- "We need to make a sacrifice to the gods, find me a young virgin... oh, and bring something to kill"
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Apparently the riving knife comes out easily. The local dealer yanked the riving knife out with out tools before I actually knew what he was doing during his short demonstration. Suddenly it was laying on the TS top.

Actually the SawStop does provide protection during coast-down. Only if you turn the saw off in the conventional way with the regular on/off switch. That switch only turns the motor off, the electronics and cartridge remain effective during coast down. Early on I enquired to SawStop about that since that was how I got cut.
If you loose power, unplug the saw or turn the saw off by the master cut off switch you would not be protected.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 04 Mar 2006 19:38:20 GMT, "Leon"

That's good design.

Now that you mention it, I think that was discussed in one of the interminable threads long ago.
I'm not yet in the market for a new saw, and may never be in the market for a saw of that price. But it does interest me.
-- "We need to make a sacrifice to the gods, find me a young virgin... oh, and bring something to kill"
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Remember, that is on the newer PM 2000 not the PM66.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 05 Mar 2006 17:03:39 GMT, "Leon"

-- "We need to make a sacrifice to the gods, find me a young virgin... oh, and bring something to kill"
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 01 Mar 2006 20:34:34 GMT, "Leon"

And most of them, if you talk to them, were careless when they had their accident. It's up to people to be careful and know when a particular cut is safe and when it is not. If the cut is not safe, one should not make it regardless of the safety equipment you have on your saw.

I never said it couldn't be useful, I just said it was more costly than it was worth IMO. On the other side, having something like that could give someone a false sense of security and lead to taking more risks than they would otherwise.

That's why most saws come with a splitter as standard equipment, it prevents kickback. Without a splitter, it is difficult, if not impossible on some cuts, to keep the kerf from closing on the far side of the blade.
It isn't all that hard to keep your finger away from the spinning knives of death if you think about what you're doing and you use the standard safety equipment. How much do you want to bet that most of the woodworkers who have lost fingers were working without a blade guard?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Honestly, I think you're being a little short-sighted. I certainly don't agree with Sawstop trying to get its technology mandated, but I can easily see it's value. There's always going to be the unknown that suddenly appears to bite you in the ass. The Sawstop to me is the same as a seatbelt in a car. It's there *if* something unforeseen happens. Nobody, or at least very few people I know go out driving to be unsafe, yet accidents happen.
As to my opinion on seatbelts for cars, I have a picture that is categorical evidence that seat belts saves lives ~ my life in this instance.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in message

When was the last time somebody lost their finger in a saw accident due to somebody running into them? I'm sure it's happened (and I'd be really pissed if somebody did that to me...) but (IMO) the ratio of serious car accidents to saw accidents has got to be a very large number. If I cut my finger on a saw, most likely it's my fault, not the fault of somebody else. If I'm in a car accident it will probably involve somebody else and won't necessarily be my fault. This is where mandatory safety devices should come into play.
Glad your still with us.
Gary
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.