thinning sharpening oil

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For some notes about honing fluids, try a look at my web site - Sharpening Notes - Fluids for Honing.
Jeff G
--
Jeff Gorman, West Yorkshire, UK
email : Username is amgron
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Jeff (and why isn't it Geoff),
I spent a couple years in England, office in London, house in Tring, and still have fond memories of those trips to the 'iron monger' who wouldn't sell me that "you know that thing that you use for such and such" until I'd learned the proper name for it. He helped me develop a rudimentry command of the english language when it comes to what we call out here in the colonies a hardware store. During my stay a wise old Brit once said to me, "Giving the English language to the Americans is a bit like giving sex to little children in that they somehow realize that its terribly important but don't know quite what to do with it." I could only reply that if they'd have managed their colonies properly in the first place, they wouldn't have this problem.
Anyway, good to find your site.
wrote

simply
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And some excellent reading from you, thank you kindly Mr. Gorman.
--
Alex - "newbie_neander" woodworker
cravdraa_at-yahoo_dot-com
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All "oils," vegetable or mineral are mixtures of various molecular weight ingredients. Take the mineral spirits and thin to get that perfect compromise between abrasion and float.
Paraffin (wax) is just oil made of the heavier fractions.
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George wrote:

My knowledge of organic chemistry is pretty sparce but from what I remember:
There are different structures found in oils. In petroleum oils a common base 'structure is a six carbon ring There are aromatic, aliphatic and parraffinic molecules. In one of the first two, I think it is aromatic, a typical ring is joined to more than two others forming a chickenwire like structure. In a Paraffinic molecule the rings are joined end-to-end by a single bond from one carbon in one ring to a another carbon in the next forming straight chains.
Thus two oil molecules with the same molecular weight can have very different properties. Petroleum distilates may be characterized by the proportion of one of these structures to the others thus haing a high or low aromaticity or parafinicity.
Generaly speaking, paraffinic molecules make good lubricants. Pennsylvania grade crude has a high paraffinicity, hence its reputation for lubricating oils (e.g. Quaker State).
Kerosene, as I recall, has a high parafinicity. I don't know if paraffin wax has a high paraffinicity. It would be ironic if it did not.
--
FF


is like chickewire while a parrafinic structure is like a chain of
hexagons
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On 9 Mar 2006 06:02:01 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@spamcop.net wrote:

I visited an oil refinery in Bradford, PA, when I was about 7 years old on a field trip with my parents when they were in college. I remember the guide saying that Pennsylvania oil was paraffin based and Texas oil was asphalt based. I've remembered that all these years, and made my motor oil buying decisions based on it.
I'm glad to read your notes which confirm my memory (I've never bothered to look it up because my knowledge of organic chemistry is sparser than yours by an order of magnitude, so I doubt I'd understand the answer). So call me stupid.
In addition to Quaker State, there's Pennzoil and Wolf's Head (if they're still around), and I believe Castrol is a paraffin oil, as well. Valvoline might be, too.
--
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
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Not bad. Aliphatic chains are mostly what we're talking about. The aromatics feature the benzene ring, and the lighter ones are difficult if not impossible to remove from various types of crude. http://users.rcn.com/jkimball.ma.ultranet/BiologyPages/H/Hydrocarbons.html
Differential distillation and cracking are used to produce the most valuable fraction - gasoline. Crude oils contain more or less of the lighter fractions and certain other elements such as sulfur in the much-maligned sour "high sulfur oils." The oil industry benchmark "Brent crude", contains a greater percentage of small stuff than heavy crude, based on average molecular weight. http://www.epa.gov/oilspill/oiltypes.htm Though it's interesting to note the Pennsylvania propaganda, Texas crude is hardly asphalt, being lighter than North Sea Brent overall. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brent_crude
Your solvents tend to be light molecular weight, which is why they reduce the viscosity of the oil they mix with. Paraffin wax, as indicated, is primarily composed of 26-carbon chains, versus gasoline, which as we know favors 8 (octane), therefore it, and other waxes are of lower volatility - solid at room temperature - and may still contain other lower molecular weight oils. Isomers, including cycloparaffin exist, and are tolerated in some grades. http://www.igiwax.com/wax_overview.shtml
You think we might refer to paraffin as "big oil?"
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Dot 3 Brake Fluid works well as a honing oil.
I've switched over to waterstones, but used to use oil stones and brake fluid.
AAvK wrote:

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On Thu, 09 Mar 2006 03:55:24 -0800, crane763 opined:

Thanks. I have an old opened bottle of brake fluid in the garage. Now there's a use for it.
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Australopithecus scobis wrote:

Just don't spill or drip it on painted surfaces.
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On 09/03/2006 10:09 AM, Australopithecus scobis wrote:

It can be a pretty nasty paint remover. Don't spill on anything you care about.
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On Thu, 09 Mar 2006 11:22:09 -0500, Doug Payne opined:

Better and better! Now there are two uses for that old bottle. ;)
--
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wreck20051219 at spambob.net
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Briefly. Since DOT 3 is glycol based, it's hygroscopic and you might end up using a water(ed) stone after all.
The DOT 5 stuff is silicone-based. More stable, but don't spill it on something you're going to paint.
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AAvK wrote:

ummmmmm. Kerosene... ummmmmm.
Reminds me of jet fuel... <G> That's a bad smell?
Barry
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Jet A fuel is diesel. Clean and well filtered.
Dave
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Teamcasa wrote:

Close enuff. <G>
Barry
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HA! LOL, my sharpening station is in the house, and that odor spreads everywhere. It's far too strong for other peoples. Perfect consistency though ... ":-( sniff
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