thinning sharpening oil

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Calling all neander sharpeners like myself, curious on how to thin down Norton oil without using stinky fumy kerosene, is there a real thin petroleum based product that would be perfect? I find the Norton to be rather too thick in many instances of flattening and honing, blade simply sliding over the stone, not effectively touching it, any advice please?
Thanks all,
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-- Stoutman http://www.garagewoodworks.com (Featuring a NEW look)

Ethyl Acetate?
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Had to think about that a little more and yes, your oil should be soluble in ethyl acetate (EtOAc). It has a fruity, estery smell. More pleasant than petroleum based solvents.
Disclaimer: (to prevent a flame war) Although fairly non-toxic, I will not make any other claims as to the safety of EtOAc. Read MSDS before use. Use in a well ventilated area. Use at own risk. etc...
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It used to be called "pear drop", having that particular smell associated with it.
Esters are OK in very minute quantity. Handle larger amounts with care.
Incidentally, I have use ordinary xxWxx motor oil on ordinary blackboard slate to sharpen chisels and knives so that I wouldn't want to slip when handling them.
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AAvK wrote:

Ray
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Seems my favorite idea so far, thanks for that but read my last reply.
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Use less, and it won't be as "thick". The oil should penetrate the stone slightly as the blade is being worked over it. If the manufacturer doesn't say to thin it, then why do so? Thinning might defeat the purpose. Why not write to them and ask their opinion? Otherwise, try mineral spirits.
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Forget the expensive honing oil. Most of it is just mineral oil. You can buy it on sale at Walgreens for $0.65/ pint. It comes in just the right viscosity for honing. Bugs
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Right but is it thinner than Norton oil? Baby oil is real thin, is it like that?
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Read the baby oil label. Mineral oil and fragrance. The stuff used as an intestinal lubricant will normally be labeled "heavy" mineral oil, and will give more float than cut.
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thickness, and the same as Norton oil, not baby oil, which is the thinness needed. I want to know about any differences. Norton calls theirs a "light mineral oil" (I read that 'somewhere' online), but it has more 'float than cut', something as thin as baby oil would be great to find, especially without that nose burning parfum. LOL
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Ethyl acetate. Have you tried it?
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Use scented lamp oil. Personally, I just use the kerosene.

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Yeah but I am leary of loading the stone with the scents of anyt kind as well as parafin, like it's related to wax?
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AAvK wrote:

There is unscented lamp oil, which is deoderized kerosene.
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No clue about Norton oil. I have never used it. I do use Japanese camilla oil and sometimes the oil for air compressors. Both are quite fluid and work well IMO, on many stones. As it happens, I do most of my sharpening on waterstones, so the oil thing is a sideline.
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Norton oil is nice, you can lube all kindza basic things with it, door hinges, manual egg beater drills, electric fan spindle bearings too, but it seems to be too thick for sharpening on a stone. The camellia is too expensive for that but I am curious about that compressor oil, is it like really thin stuff? Maybe a little thicker than mineral spirits or kerosene?
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This is why I ask, other than my experience with the oil's thickness. In this page you can pick out some good details as to what is going on with oils for honing and the differences in stones. If everyone in this threads reads all of it, you'll see where I'm at with it, it is a really good read, and enlightening.
Page: "The joys of Arkansas stones":
http://home.pacifier.com/~davewe/The_Joys_of_Arkansas_Stones.htm
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