thin kerf vs. thick?

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I've been using the thin kerf style blades for a couple of years now but I'm beginning to think I ought to go back to the 1/8" kerfed blades for my TS and MS. Less deflection, longer life, more carbide for resharpening and a kerf that's easy to account for are just a few reasons. The only advantage to a thin kerf I can see is less strain on a motor when using a dull blade. What are your thoughts?
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wrote:

What about the wood you save with narrower kerfs?
Barry
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I've been told by the folks that sell WW2, that think kerf is better suited for a TS with less that 3HP. I've got the regular kerf and I'm planning to by the thin kerf at the next Woodworkers Show in Sacramento.

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I use a full kerf on a 2HP saw and it goes through wood like butter. Ok, I haven't tried 12/4 maple yet, but 4/4 maple is a breeze...
Does your saw have a hard time? Slow feed rates or bogging? If not, why buy a thin kerf blade if you have a very expensive regular kerf blade already?
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I've got a Ridgid TS2400LS saw. We got it almost 2 years ago when I was starting taking classes in woodshop. If I knew then what I know now, I would have spent the extra money and bought a "real" cabinet saw. I've ripped alder, oak and cedar with the WW2 with no problems (maybe a little burn, but no hesitation).
Ok, you've convinced me to save the $90 at the show and buy some other "toy". Also I've got $85 coming to me from working at the polling place this last Tuesday. Wow, what can $175 buy?

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A little bit of cherry? Buy wood!!!
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I hear them say that also but don't understand it. Maybe 1/2 hp for thin kerf as a regular kerf worked fine on my old 1 hp TS.
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Unless you cut a lot of thick stock, I don't see much benefit but I do see some potential problems with wavy cuts. They also recommend a stabilizer with the thin kerf. For my use, I just don't seen enough of a benefit. Ed
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isn't that a tiny amount? I prefer the std kerf blade for being less flexible and more apt to run true. I HATE the thin kerf blades on my miter box; can't do a wide cut without getting a curved cut. no matter how slow I feed the blade. learned the hard way when cutting shallow drawer pieces from baltic birch. That problem prompted me to halt a project and spend the day building a 2 runner sled with Incra slides. Now I crosscut anything I want dead straight, on the TS.
dave
B a r r y wrote:

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Dave,
I switched to a 44 tooth GP Freud Diablo thin kerf on my 12" TS and have been real happy with it. I have been mainly dealing with hard maple up to 8/4s, but also ply, teak and cedar (up to 16/4). I also cut all the aluminum plate 3/4" for mounting servo motors for my CNC mill conversion. I just installed it as with any blade, no stabalizers. I have cross cut glued boards 20" wide and I can flip one side over and the butt is perfect. Having a sliding table Wadkin where everything is adjustable does help:).
Another post mentioned re-sharpening, from memory I paid about $35.00 from either Lowe's of HD, at that price I'd rather have a new blade.
Bernard R

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I think the slider is what allows a straight cut. When a thin kerf blade is mounted on a non slider, it's more likely a wide cut will be bowed.
dave
Bernard Randall wrote:

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Oh.. No... you really did not ask that.... LOL
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On Wed, 03 Mar 2004 23:54:10 GMT, "Leon"

Trollin', trollin' trollin'... <G>
Barry
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LOL... You know, years ago,,,15 maybe, they used that as a sales pitch... Less wasteful... When was the last time you used all of a board...
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Yeahbutt - what I lose in wood, I get back in sawdust. (Necessary for those of us who still need a'lotta "filler") :)
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What little extra wood you lose, you make up for in a more rigid, less likely to flex or warp blade in the full kerf versions
Only time I can think that a thin kerf would be useful is on grossly underpowered saws, OR in production of LOTS of thin strips/inlay stuff with expensive exotic woods. And if the wood is that expensive/rare, then a bandsaw would be very viable alternative if not a better choice all around
John
wrote:

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Personally I find very little difference in wood saving between using a band and table saw, presuming that the cut is within the capacity of both saws, more so the thicker the wood. I am quite prepared to accept that it is my technique. choice of equipment etc, in which case I welcome enlightenment.
I have found very few BS blades that track perfectly, I've tried euro style flat , cam adjusted tangental and cool block type bearings. No matter how carefully I adjust, the resulting cut always needs some planing action, with both sides of the cut being planed net savings are generally zero.
Bernard R

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One of my neighbors had a wood shop for years and used thin kerf blades for just that reason. When he retired, he used all the wood saved from it to build a new house and furniture for it. Sure is a lot of glue joints with all the small pieces, but he saved a bundle. Ed
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wrote in message

Uh huh..
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wrote in message

OK.... time to fess up!!
Awww ... Now come on .... Who _gave_ him the forty tons of glue he needed ?????
Curious minds wanna know :-)
-- Steve www.ApacheTrail.com/ww/ Penury is the mother of invention!
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