thin kerf or reg keft ts blades?

thoughts?
The argument for TK was less wood, less dust, thicker wood capacity
My thoughts is TK is also going to wobble more, cut rougher.
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Thin kerf if you must (marginally powered saw)
Full kerf if you can. I really do think the cut is better.
I think the "uses less wood argument is pretty weak. I also think the an exactly 1/8" kerf is handly for measuring. Sometimes I make a cut, for instance a rabbet, where the cut measurement includes the kerf. It's much more handy to have a round number when adding the kerf to the TS scale.
-Steve
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Stephen M wrote:

Not all full kerf blades are 1/8" exactly. Some melamine blades are 0.134", for instance.
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Kevin wrote:

I don't see any particular extra flutter during cut that is significant, but do notice it on startup. (Of course, the PM66 flings it to speed a heck of a lot quicker than do many smaller ts's or contractors' models.) I've gotten a few dings in the blade insert from that w/ them that doesn't happen otherwise.
I only use the thin kerf rip version when I double-gang them for cutting tenons--they work fine as far as the quality goes. If I'd had the opportunity to try it first, I'd have gone w/ a regular thickness to avoid the above issue, but I didn't have a pair of identically matched and so for the purpose when I made the purchase seemed a reasonable choice...
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While many promote the savings of wood that the thin kerf saves I would imagine for the normal user it may save you wood 1% of the time when ripping if the waste is still useable. For the length of the board probably never.
The thin kerf will not necessarily gibe you a rougher cut but then cutting thinker materials, harder materials, and a miter or bevel the cut will not be as true as the of one made with a regular kerf blade assuming equal quality blades.
The first thin kerf blade that I used on my TS was in the early to mid 80's and man did that saw blade cut fast. The cuts however were not true. A few years later I bought a good quality Systematic regular kerf combo blade and it cut much better and only slightly slower than the thin kerf, and that was on a TS with a 1 hp motor.
If you buy a good to premium quality regular kerf blade you should benefit more over a thin kerf.
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I have a Forrest WWII thin kerf.
Love it. If I had a 3hp or more cabinet saw instead of the contractor saw I would go with the 1/8 blade.
I don't think of it as saving wood, but allowing me to cut the wood with less power, and more easily. With the large stabilizer on it doesn't vibrate , at least that I can tell. With it off, it may, I don't see a difference in the cut.
As always you mileage may vary.
Kevin wrote:

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On Wed, 23 Jan 2008 12:20:46 -0700, "Kevin"
Try each type in your operation. Then from you own experience select what works best for you, use it, and let the excess verbiage, prejudices, and irrelevant opinions pass by ignored.
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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Are you related to the Black & Veatch families?
<Tom Veatch> wrote in message wrote:

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On Wed, 23 Jan 2008 23:05:46 -0700, "Kevin"

I don't think so. If there is a common ancestry, it predates the War of Northern Aggression.
About 40 years ago, I was close to getting my Engineering degree and was putting out employment feelers. I noted the commonality of names and, more out of curiosity than anything else, sent them a letter. Never received a reply. Guess they weren't into nepotism.
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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| thoughts? | | The argument for TK was less wood, less dust, thicker wood capacity | | My thoughts is TK is also going to wobble more, cut rougher. | I use the cheapo Oldham 60T thin kerf blades from Home Depot (about $20) for alot of my ripping only and my cuts are fairly smooth; for crosscutting I have been using the Amana Melamine blade ($80). Just works for me. I use a couple of Freud blades also, but these are more than adequate and are cost effective. I don't have the cheap blades sharpened, but pile them up for steel scrap. I do sharpen the Amanas and Freuds.
My feeble opinion
woodstuff, have a good day.
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