Thin Kerf Blades was Hard Wood!

Leon,
Any particular reason you don't recommend thin kerf blades? I've been using a Freud Diablo thin kerf on my 12" sliding table Wadkin for the past year with excellent results, mainly on maple but also some red oak and teak. The reason I switched was because of poor results I had from a DML.
Thanks
Bernard
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Blade flex. While for many people and what they do with their saws may or may not require "dead flat" cuts, when cutting 45's and other angles in thicker and wider hard woods the gap can be pretty serious when it comes time to assemble. I like joints where the joint line literally disappears. Many years ago and when woodworking was still in my hobby stage I used thin kerf blades. Wow.. they cut like a hot knife through butter. After the gee whiz factor wore off I noticed that some cuts were not coming out "flat". No problem, I'll sand it. ;~) I put up with this unknowingly for several years as I never really had a better cut. Prior to going to thin kerf I used the regular kerf blades. Boy were they slow, so slow that I had to stop often to let the saw catch up and come back up to speed. Unfortunately this can often cause a wavy and or "non-flat" cut also. It also goes without saying that I was using a saw that had lack of power issues. 1989 comes around and my wife and I decided to redo the kitchen in stages and replace all the cabinets and change the shape of the kitchen. While visiting a local saw sharpening service to sharpen my thin kerf blade, the owner inquires about the reason that I used a thin kerf blade. I gave him all the above stated reasons for having one. Basically it cut faster. He explained to me that a regular kerf Good Quality blade would work better. Of coarse he had one on sale. I bought a Systematic 50 tooth combination blade. I went home and mounted the blade on my Craftsman "1" hp table saw, turned the saw on and stood there wondering if I has just blown $60. I grabbed a piece of oak and cross cut it. It did not cut super fast like the thin kerf blade but it did cut very smoothly and evenly and the saw motor did not strain. I got the best cut that I had ever gotten on that saw. I used that blade exclusively for the next 11 years. Later I sold the saw and the blade went with the saw. Today I use and own 2 regular kerf 40 tooth WWII's on a cabinet saw. I keep a Systematic regular kerf rip blade for construction grade lumber cutting.
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Leon,
Appreciate your detailed reply. This past year I've re-built our kitchen so I haven't had any call to tilt the blade. Part of the re-build was a 2" thick end grain butcher block which came out of 8/4 rough sawn hard maple, put together it looks like a homogenous piece apart from the change in grain patterns. I also used the Diablo to cut up to 2" thick aluminum for the conversion of my metal mill to CNC, the cuts are better than a milled surface.
I'll watch for the phenomenon you mention if I have to tilt the blade. On the question of power I don't understand the need for 5HP motors on 10" saws, as seems to be common in the U.S., the Wadkin comes with 3HP for a 12" which is more than adequate for my needs.
Thanks,
BR

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IMHO in a shop that is not running the TS 8-10 hours a day 3hp is plenty. I would only recommend 5 hp if you use a power feeder and run the saw for extended periods of time.
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