Thin-Kerf Blades

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I bought a couple to help out on the low-powered portable Ridgid saw. I since sold that saw but kept the blades which I have used on my Delta Hybrid. They work great as long as I use a set of stabilizers. BUT.... I like my Royce-Ayr 0.126 blades much better.
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|I was at my least favorite store today - the orange one. They have 10" TS | saw blades, and some say "thin kerf". | | But are they realy thin kerf, or is that just marketing hype? None of them | list their actual thickness, so I am little skeptical about buying one | unless I know that it really thin kerf. When I stack one against a regular | blade, they seem pretty much the same to me. |
If you were in the same brand of orange store I frequent when I'm desperate, they have many rulers and other measuring devices hanging on pegs near the saw blades. A "standard" blade has a kerf around 1/8" and you should be able to at least eyeball how much less any particular blade is than that.
Norm
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would be just a hair over 1/8" and a thin kerf could be about 7/64"
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I guess another big advantage to using a 1/8" kerf blade is during lay out planning. It is pretty easy to figure an additional 1/8" here and an additional 1/8" there when trying to determine if you can get so many pieces out of a piece of wood while ripping. The typical 3/32" kerf almost requires the use of a calculator. 7/64" here and there and here again would be a royal PIA. I mean what does 1.25" plus 1.25" plus 1.25", plus 1.25" plus 7/64" plus 7/64" plus 7/64" add up to? If the blade was 1/8" kerf the answer would be 5-3/8", yes that S4S 1 x 6 will work. Fortunately my software takes that all into consideration but if you only need to cut a few pieces from a single board out of a stack of various width boards, let me stick with 1/8"
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I have an old delta contractor's saw. I have a WWII 0.125" kerf blade. The cut has a lot of burning and drag when used on thick lumber (which of course includes bevel cuts on 3/4" stock). I bought a freud thin kerf 24 tooth rip blade specifically for ripping. Maybe the cut of the Freud isn't polished smooth, but it flies thru the wood with zero burning. Being lazy, I frequently use the rip blade for cross cutting when a small amount of tear out is tolerable. I only use the WWII for plywood and 3/4" stock or thinner. If I had to do it over, I'd try the WWII thin kerf with 30 teeth.
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Which particular WWII were you using, the 30 or 40 tooth count blade. The 30 count is recommended for cuts in stock 2" or thicker.
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I have the 40 tooth WWII. It was definitely a mistake. I am utterly amazed at how much faster the thin kerf 24T freud blade cuts with zero burn.
It might be my imagination, but I think the easier cutting contributes to a straighter cut. If you have to use more force, the whole blade/wood geometry gets strained which can cause a bad cut. I've noticed this doing a miter cut on wood hand held to the miter gauge (as opposed to clamped to a sled).
Mitch
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wrote in message
I have the 40 tooth WWII. It was definitely a mistake. I am utterly amazed at how much faster the thin kerf 24T freud blade cuts with zero burn.
After 30 years of doing this seriousely, I'll keep my 40 thooth for 99% of my cuts.
It might be my imagination, but I think the easier cutting contributes to a straighter cut. If you have to use more force, the whole blade/wood geometry gets strained which can cause a bad cut. I've noticed this doing a miter cut on wood hand held to the miter gauge (as opposed to clamped to a sled).
For a typical cut the think kerf may in deed yield good results, probably not better than a regular kerf blade, all things being equal. Start making compound miter cuts through 2" thick stock and you will probably see the advantage of regular kerf vs. thin.
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If you went metric it would do away with those problems and you could go back to simple mental arithmetic what ever the kerf width. ;-)
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Jerome Meekings wrote:

Yeah, making it 3.175 millimeters is going to be a BIG help.
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wrote:

How would 5.556 mm be easier to do in your head? ;~)
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Isn't that .223 [cal.]?
Dave in Houston
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There is an article on thin kerf at
http://www.carbideprocessors.com/tech_saw_blade_index.htm
Tom

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thin kerf blades help on an underpowered saw... use a blade stabiliser with it... I use a forrest thin kerf wwii, and a forrest stabiliser - it's a superflat disc. do NOT use the stabiliser "cups" - they're awful
shelly
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and keep your carbide blade tips and sawblade clean
Philski

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This is one of those "hot-button" things like religion and politics. My heretical advice to anyone considering a thin-kerf (~3/32) blade is, "Go ahead and try it. If you like the results, ignore the nay-sayers and enjoy. If you don't, then stop using it. Simple as that!"
I've never used anything but thin-kerf blades on my 3HP cabinet saw which I don't consider to be "underpowered" in the least. Have never used a blade stabilizer other than the standard issue arbor washer. On my well aligned saw with a jointed edge against the fence, I can make glue-line quality cuts all day. Don't see how a thicker blade can improve on that.
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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