Thickness sander


Let me restate this! I would like any personal experience with the RYOBI WDS1600 drum sander. I have been to the comparison sites with the other sanders.(Google, yahoo and others) I know that the sander is no longer being made, but the sander I am being offered has been well maintained and the price is right. It has been just use for light sanding and will be. (Luthiery) Thank you
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Richard,

Richard L. Rombold
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Richard wrote:

Since you feel it's like the Performax (from your earlier post), I'd go for it, with the caveat that it'll work fine for LIGHT cuts. Enjoy. Let us know how it works out for you.
Dave
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Richard wrote:

No experience but if "the price is right" and you're only expecting light usage don't see why not to go ahead. I assume you can try the unit out before committing to see how it works w/ some of your operations?
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I didn't see the earlier post.
I owned one of these. Got it off off eBay for $500 and sold it on craigs list 9 months later for $600. I sold it because I gained access to a wide belt and could use the cash.
It worked pretty well. - Getting the paper attached into the clips at the ends of the cylinder is a bit tricky but once you figure that out it's not too bad.
- Getting the feed belt to track properly is a bit sensitive. You have adjustments at the exit end with spring loaded screws. I found that having the adjustment too tight would make the tracking more sensitive so I ran it pretty losse and the feed belt stayed centered better.
- The biggest problem is actually avoidable if you use good technique. The way you adjust the depth of each pass is by lowering the head unit toward the table with a screw mechnism. However lowering it turns out to be a little problematic. On mine, even if you lowered it exactly 1/4 turn for each new pass every now and then the sucker would drop too far and the piece would stall out on the next pass becuse it was cutting too deep. Once it stalls it cuts even deeper and it takes 4 or 5 passes to sand out the gully. However, if you lower it say 3/4 of a turn, then back up 1/4 turn, you are always on the up stroke and having the head drop too far on the threads is avoided.
- On my unit, the feed mooter would stall out sometimes too. It just wouldn't start. I would just crank the speed upt to the max and push the belt by hand and it would start running. The feed motor looked like a standard motor that could easily be replaced so I didn't sweat it.
- Finally, if you are going to try sand boards that are wider than unit, you need to adjust the head so it is slightly higher on the outside (the open side). You have to take very shallow passes and you end up with a piece that is just slightly thicker in the middle. Trying to get it perfectly flat is impossible, you will always get a line at the end of the cylinder unless is is just slightly high on the outside. I left mine setup like that all the time because it was so minimal I never noticed it on typical pieces.
If I was deciding between the Ryobi and Performax, it would just be a price thing. If I could get the Ryobi for significantly less, I would do it.
BW
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Older Ryobi tool are ok. Have a 1 3/4 hp router and a 10" planer. Both are old, but work great.
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SonomaProducts.com wrote:

Thanks for the reply. The sander has been used very little. I ran some wood though it and and for the light duty that I am going the use it for it works good. A 8 broad sanded out to less than .001" differance form side to side. So at $225.00 I figured it was a good by.
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Richard,

Richard L. Rombold
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$225 is a steal. You have an official gloat.
BW
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SonomaProducts.com wrote:

NO The real gloat is the 200+ bdft of oak, about 1/2 quarter sawed, 15 to 20 Ft. of Myrtle wood, and about 30 Ft of fiddle back, Black Walnut. All for $1.25 a bdft. Now to find a place for it.
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Richard,

Richard L. Rombold
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