They can't build them like they used to

Thought some of you (Lew?) might be interested in an article on repairs to a 50+ year old Chesapeake Bay skipjack. Skipjacks are working sailboats, first built in the mid to late 1800s, used for dredging oysters on the bay. The article is at:
http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/local/harford/bal-md.ha . skipjack23feb23,0,998213.story?track=rss
(watch the line wrap, or just go to www.baltimoresun.com and look for " 'Martha' fix isn't smooth sailing " article.)
This quote about the size of the timbers used and implying a scarf joint got my attention:
"In the most difficult phase of the restoration, volunteer workers replaced the chine log, a 50 foot piece of oak that runs the length of the starboard side. Unable to find a single piece as long as the original chine, workers coupled two oak boards - each 8 inches wide and 2 inches thick - at a slanted joint that spreads the stress over a longer distance, Shinn said."
It's even more remarkable when you consider that one of the reasons the skipjack was developed was that timbers large enough to build an earlier design (the bugeye) had become too hard to find.
There's a website with more info for those interested:
http://www.skipjackmarthalewis.org/oyster.htm
Oh, and my favorite quote from the article:
"They thought it was safe to name the ship after mother," said Cindi Beane, executive director of the Chesapeake Heritage Conservancy, a Harford County nonprofit that owns the Martha Lewis. "Wives could come and go but you always have your mother."
--
When the game is over, the pawn and the king are returned to the same box.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf.lonestar.org
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On Sat, 24 Feb 2007 06:09:18 +0000, Larry W wrote:

Very interesting article. Listing of the skipjacks at the end of the article is not something you see nowadays with newspapers. I hope that they get it restored and up and running by April. Sounds like a trip aboard would be a get vacation trip. Thanks for sharing the article with us.
Paul T.
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By some odd coincidence my wife and I stopped by the yard to see the Martha Lewis this afternoon. Her captain was there and we had a nice chat. They're replacing a number of planks on the starboard side. Above the water it'll be with Ponderossa Pine; below with Douglas fir, and there's quite a nice stack of 8/4 lumber there ready to go. Fasteners will be #18 galvanized screws and boat nails.
Jack
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Sat, Feb 24, 2007, 6:09am (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@sdf.lNoOnSePsAtMar.org (LarryW) doth sayeth: Thought some of you (Lew?) might be interested in an article on repairs to a 50+ year old Chesapeake Bay skipjack. <snip>
Can't? Or don't?
JOAT When in doubt, go to sleep. - Mully Small
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Larry W wrote: > Thought some of you (Lew?) might be interested in an article on repairs > to a 50+ year old Chesapeake Bay skipjack. <snip>
Restoring old wooden boats requires a skill set I do not possess, nor do I have the patience to acquire them.
I simply admire those who can.
Lew
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Thu, Mar 1, 2007, 5:56pm (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net (LewHodgett) doth sayeth: Restoring old wooden boats requires a skill set I do not possess, nor do I have the patience to acquire them. I simply admire those who can.
I bet you subscribe to WoodenBoat. Best woodworking magazine ther is.
JOAT When in doubt, go to sleep. - Mully Small
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