The WWing Gods have spoken (sorry to ramble)

Greetings, I don't want to bore the Wreck with the details, but I'm into a major remodel of my house. It will realistically take a couple of years, mainly because I will do a lot of it myself (damn that budget!). It will involve amongst others, a new kitchen and bathroom.
Although I would like to do the kitchen cabs myself, my time frame (and current skill levels) won't allow it. But the bathroom cabs are now on my to-do list. :-) I'm shooting for an asian influenced design, and my wood of choice is teak. While my wife and I were at a bathroom supply/design center yesterday we found the exact style we are after. Made from teak and the design we want. Unfortunately her jaw dropped when she saw the $2000 (US) price tag on the vanity. Where she is from, that is what a person earns in a year! (Don't ask, another long story). She told me to find another kind of cabinet that won't cost so much. Damn, there goes the bathroom I wanted. :-(
Lo and behold, what was in the mail when we arrived home? The latest Wood magazine with a bathroom vanity on the front cover!!! She asks if I can make something like that myself. I tell her honestly that I haven't made any cabinets (yet), but by following/adapting the magazine plans I should be able to do it. Of course, I follow with, "But I do need one more tool in order for this to happen". The DJ-20 (too bad the price just went up $50) would complete my major machine purchases, and she gave me the go-ahead to get one. Hot Damn!!!!!
So all of this has led up to a few questions (of course). I'm in the midst of going through some of the 4,190 references to teak via Google. Most of the posts are about finishing, but first I seek advice on buying teak. There are many types of teak, and the cabs we like are Burmese teak. Do all types of teak have a similar look? Can anyone recommend a mail order source, or should I find a local hardwood lumber yard and pick it out myself? I already know it is an expensive wood.
When it comes to machining, I realize using carbide is advisable. Is teak tough on planer/jointer blades also? Are the DJ-20 blades reversible, or should I just order a spare set before I need them? It's worth the price, just to avoid having to stop for sharpening in the middle of something. As for the mortises, I'll probably get the conical stone for the chisels.
Lastly (for now), what about glue? I know this has been hashed out before, is poly the way to go? The oil that gives teak it insect/water resistant also makes it difficult to glue. I'm still looking through Google about glue anyway...
        Thanks to all who find the time to help me out,         Mark L.
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wrote:

Teak is an oily wood, full of silicon. It will quickly dull your bits, blades, and knives. Clean the glue surface areas with acetone before applying woodworkers glue. Most teak, with exception of Burma, is rather dark so a dark woodworkers glue is a better choice. Find a local source to save on shipping costs. Personally, I'd pick a lower cost wood such as oak, maple or even cherry and save my cutting edges and wallet.
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Most of my house already has oak, and I think it's time for a change. Maple and cherry are not really appropriate for the look, just my personal preference. I wish teak was a little easier on the wallet, but it's the route I'm taking anyway. At least I'm not too naive (hopefully) going into this.....
Phisherman wrote:

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Mark L. wrote:

Having made that decision, you might find it helpful to do a Google Groups search on "teak texas" in this newsgroup
<http://www.google.com/groups?as_q=teak%20texas&as_ugroup=rec.woodworking&as_scoring=d&hl=en
I recall that there was someone in Texas with a substantial supply that he was willing to ship around the USA.
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto, Iowa USA
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I did email him (don't remember his name off hand) with no reply. Maybe if he reads this, he'll respond... In the meantime, it's back to googling.
Morris Dovey wrote:

<http://www.google.com/groups?as_q=teak%20texas&as_ugroup=rec.woodworking&as_scoring=d&hl=en

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Mark L. wrote:

I think you're talking about Jeremy: snipped-for-privacy@dcnet2001.com . He hasn't been around lately that I know of. I emailed him a couple months ago about his teak. Didn't hear back. Hope he's OK.     mahalo,     jo4hn
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I just mailed him again. If I hear from him, I'll let you know.
jo4hn wrote:

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On Sun, 15 Aug 2004 16:36:46 +0000, Mark L. wrote: <snip>

Cool!>

Try vivisimo.com the left hand edge of the screen will sort the various responses into subcategories (very helpful).

Best bet is to scope out the wood in the flesh at a local woodyard. If you find what you like then check out other sources. Don't forget that your local supplier has to sell his product to make a living, so compare prices carefully. What you save in taxes and other fees may be eaten up by the shipping cost from some out of town supplier.
Tony
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How true it is. As much as I like to support the local guys (I figure the profits they make somehow will funnel into my little corner of the world), sometimes an online deal is hard to pass up. Until the shipping comes into play, and then it's pretty much a level playing ground for all parties concerned. Mark L.
Anthony VanCampen wrote:

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Wood shipped from N.Y. to So. Calif. coast was less than half the local price with shipping cost included.
wrote:

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wrote:

I've used teak for a small project. In my case, a jewelery box.
It's really tough on HSS blades, router bits, what have you. Go carbide. The knives on that DJ-20 are HSS, they're not reversable. Teak has a lot of silica in it, it's also oily. There's epoxy available for oily wood, a product from Industrial Formulators of Canada named G2. I think you can get if from Lee Valley.
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Thanks, any excuse to wander over to Lee Valley is a good one. ;-)
Lazarus Long wrote:
<Self snippage>

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I could have written this... while picking through 2X6 studs and 1/2" CDX Saturday I had to keep chanting the mantra "it's not furniture, it's not for furniture... it's not furniture, it's not for furniture..." ;-)

Good choice. I really like mine. Re the knives, they are not reversible. I'd think you should be able to get through a vanity project and more without sharpening if you keep using a different part of the knives by moving the fence regularly.
John
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Good idea about moving the fence, evens out the wear. Thanks
John Grossbohlin wrote:

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There's a wood they buy in quantity at the local cabinet shop which they call canarywood, other posters here might be able to tell you more about it, but to me it's very close to the look and properties of teak, and, I believe, less expensive.
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Bub 209 responds:

Don't know about the expense, but Centrolobium spp. looks a lot like teak, is about as durable, and works much more easily...no inclusions, no need for special gluing clean-ups.
Canarywood seems to be the preferred name, but one source lists 42 common names for varied species. AKA arirba, porcupinewood, putumuju.
Charlie Self "Bore, n.: A person who talks when you wish him to listen." Ambrose Bierce, The Devil's Dictionary
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Thanks Bub and Charlie, I'm taking a drive to a few local hardwood yards this weekend to ask about the canarywood.
Charlie Self wrote:

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Teak is gonna be right pricey but is found at any number of sources.
You didn't mention what part of the world you are in ???
Teak plywood would be a MUCH better choice for a bathroom vanity.
These folks carry most of the major flavors:
http://boulterplywood.com /
A MUCH cheaper and easier wood is Spanish Cedar which is neither spanish or cedar but is a beautiful exotic that is a member of the mahogany family and sells MUCH cheaper than teak.
Check with these folks:
http://walllumber.com/exo.asp
Mark L. wrote:

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