The unoffial glue test.

I wanted to test fine woodworking's glue tests to see if Titebond III Ultimate Wood Glue glues oily woods better then gorilla glue. Well I wanted to get as accurate as possible so I used the same piece of wood for both glues. I freshly surfaced the woods before I glued them up. For the poly test I dampened both sides as that makes a stronger bond. I glued up padouk ipe and cocobolo. I clamped the pieces overnight and then I broke them part while they spanned a gap. Cocobolo broke with the least effort though it seemed it took more work to break the titebond joint. There was a tiny bit of wood stuck to one side of the joint with titebond non on the gorilla glue joint. Next was padouk both joints were stronger then the wood as the pics show. Then ipe the titebond joint was stronger but not by a huge amount. Almost no wood was stuck to the other piece on the gorilla glue test and about ½ the surface on the titebond test. So I guess now titebond does glue oily woods better.
http://www.knight-toolworks.com/pictures/gluetest1.JPG
http://www.knight-toolworks.com/pictures/gluetest2.JPG
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I am finding that the best glue for Ipe and outdoor use is the one with threads on it and looks like a screw. :~)
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Leon wrote:

I eagerly await Steve's "Backpacker" line of planes: all held together with drywall screws.
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yep or the silicone glue. but I hope people don't store my tools outside (G) but this is the glue I can now recommend to glue my plane kits together.
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Steve,
As a boatbuilder I believe in epoxy as the 'Ultimate' adhesive. However, I do use Titebond III as my 'standard' for non-water immersed applications. Also I recently did some experiments with 'Gorilla' and the Elmers brand of poly's - for a Non-Wood application.
A suggestion, if I may. To increase the attachment with 'exotics' or known 'oily' woods - wipe the mating surfaces with a cloth dampened with Acetone, or a similar solvent. {It should dry almost instantly}Immediately apply the adhesive and proceed with your standard methodology.
Regards & Good Luck, Ron Magen Backyard Boatshop

I glued up padouk ipe and cocobolo.
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I think Ipe may be a different beast. I have on 3 different occasions glued Ipe with TB III once, and polyurethane twice. These were rather insignificant projects, a cutting board for out door BBQ, Outdoor Flag Mount, and outdoor gate handle. All 3 were made from scraps, prepped with acetone, and remained in doors for a few months waiting for a project to use them on. All three have failed at the glue lines after being outdoors.
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the acetone did not help matters it tends to pull the oil to the surface. still got to test e6000 that stuff sticks to everything and with a little flex tends to hold up well to wood movement.
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I would like to know how the e6000 holds up as so far I have not found a glue tha holds up outdoors with Ipe. I have not had a problem if the wood stays dry.
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when I get some I will test with ipe. sometimes flex is good I find.
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Steve, That's the point of the exercise. And the fact that I usually 'test' everything before a critical application.
Typically, the application 'cloth' is only slightly dampened {I use folded paper towels}. This way you wipe on the solvent, and wipe off any 'residue' at the same time. In your case, with this particular wood, you may want to try another technique. Wipe on the Acetone {or another solvent, with a slightly slower evaporation rate}, and a few seconds later wipe it off with a dry cloth . . . taking up the solvent and suspended 'contaminants'.
Regards & Good Luck, Ron Magen Backyard Boatshop
SNIP

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Not sure if you recall an epoxy by name of Dalbond. Was specifically formulated for oily tropicals like cocobolo.
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