The U.S. Government Is Trying To Take Away Your Pocket Knives!

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DGDevin wrote:

In the case of guns, "need" is seldom an issue. The thing that counts most is "want."
If I "want" a fully-automatic weapon to mow down prarie dogs, why not?
If I "want" a fully-automatic weapon for sport, target shooting, investment, historical artifiact, or simply for collecting, why not?
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"HeyBub" wrote:

If that's what it takes to give you a testosterone fix, so be it, but just do the background and register them.
You will never understand "Why not?"
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Inasmuch as there have been only two documented crimes since 1934 committed by federally-registered automatic weapons (and one of those was by a police officer using a department weapon), the interesting question is: Does the registration itself prevent crimes or are the crimes themselves so rare as to make registration an unnecessary burden?
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Bob S. wrote:

Conversely, there are people who would believe a fully-automatic gun would be nice whenever they are shot at by anything.
Remember the rule: "He who puts the most metal in the air generally wins."
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Hmmm, we're all woodworkers here, right?
Next time you go into your shop take a look at your 1/8" mortice chisel. Feel how comfortably it fits in your hand, look at that blade, it's realy sharp on the end isn't it - you honed it to perfection. It's a good strong straight blade, about 4" long, much more suited to being driven into something than a knife........
Look at that little pruning saw you bought a few days ago, you know, the one with the fold out 8" blade. It's a pull saw. Think what those teeth could do to human flesh. A knife might cut to the bone - that thing? - well I'll leave that to your own imagination.....
Who needs a knife ;-|
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Here's one that always amuses me: TSA will confiscate a Stanley pocket knife, or a small screwdriver, while allowing hundreds of people onto aircraft while those people have pockets, or briefcases, full of nicely sharpened pencils. Many of today's cheap ball point pens can also serve as effective stabbing implements. If you want to slow someone up, rip your house or car keys across his face at eye level, the poke an eye with one of the keys. If you're on an aircraft, odds are about 99 to 1 that the seat in front of you will contain both a glossy magazine and a catalog. Roll either tightly and ram the result into someone's solar plexus.
There's simply too much nonsense about weaponry.
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When I saw the original post, I knew it was going to light some fires. I never thought it would go on this long.
Good Grief!
Doesn't anyone have time for woodworking any more?
RonB
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In article

I spent a goodly proportion of today grinding and carefully honing some chisels :-)
To use on wood I might add!
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Stuart wrote:

Are you making a Zip gun?
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RonB wrote:

Does fixing up a Fender Presision Bass I found at a flea market for a hundred bucks count?
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<...snipped...>All this hocus pocus about hand guns makes me laugh.

That is equivalent to "I've never used a table saw guard and I still have all my fingers, so it must be safe."
--
There is always an easy solution to every human problem -- neat,
plausible, and wrong." (H L Mencken)
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http://www.kniferights.org/U%20S%20Customs%20Proposed%20Ruling%20-%20Assisted%20Opening%20Knives.pdf
John,
That's a 63 page document that I don't have time to read thoroughly right now but a quick brief shows that you left out the word "imported" in your haste to spread the news. After looking at some of the imported knives being denied entry into the US, I would agree that those I did read about are not general utility knives and certainly do fall into the category of a weapon..
They define "switchblade" and the reasoning behind the ruling. What part is making my pocket knives illegal?
There are people out there that would insist that a fully automatic weapon is a necessary hunting gun - right up until they have been shot at by one.
Bob S.
Bob,
You missed a couple points... One being that the vast majority of the knives sold in the US are imported. Even the Boy Scout pocket knive are these days since the demiss of Schrade and then Camillus. Rather than rewrite the thing, following is part of an e-mail being distributed by Citizens Committee for the Right to Keep and Bear Arms.
The Second Amendment Foundation and the Citizens Committee for the Right to Keep and Bear Arms have joined with Knife Rights to help fight this unwarranted knife grab by Customs. Alan Gottlieb CCRKBA Chairman noted, "we stand with Knife Rights in their support of Americans' right to own and carry the knives of their choice."
And, just a reminder, the Second Amendment doesn't say "Firearms," it says "Arms," and knives are clearly covered.
The U.S. Government is after your Pocket Knives! In a sneak attack, U.S. Customs has proposed revoking earlier rulings that assisted opening knives are not switchblades. The proposal would not only outlaw assisted opening knives, its overly broad new definition of a switchblade would also include all one-handed opening knives and most other pocket knives!
U.S. Customs & Border Protection (CBP) on May 21st proposed revoking earlier rulings that assisted opening knives are not switchblades. The proposed new rule would not only outlaw assisted opening knives, its new broad definition of a switchblade could also include one-handed opening knives and could be easily interpreted to cover most other pocket knives, even simple old-fashioned slip-joints.
At this point, one-hand opening and assisted opening knives are 80% of U.S. knife sales. For most knife companies, they represent all or the majority of their product lines. These are the knives Americans take with them to work and to play everyday.
Note, please, that CBP's interpretation of the Federal Switchblade Act forms the basis for national, state and even local law and judicial rulings in many cases. This ruling by CBP is NOT limited to just imports. This WILL affect virtually everyone who carries a pocket knife, no matter the type!
CBP came up with this absurd proposal and then tried slipping it into their regular notices, apparently hoping nobody would become aware of until too late. They provided for only the minimum 30-day comment period, and there's no email comments allowed. Just yesterday CBP rejected numerous requests for an extension to the unduly short comment period. Obviously, they'd just as soon not hear from us. We're intending to disappoint them in that.
CBP's proposal would have effects far beyond that suggested in the title of the proposal, "Proposed Revocation Of Ruling Letters And Revocation Of Treatment Relating To The Admissibilty [sic] Of Certain Knives With Spring-Assisted Opening Mechanisms," which would be bad enough even if it only did that. However, this proposal would likely make it illegal for the estimated 40 million law-abiding Americans who own and carry pocket knives to do so. It would also cost this country dearly in destroyed businesses, lost jobs and ruined families.
Thousands of jobs and billions of dollars would be lost. CBP clearly appears to not have considered the consequences of this unnecessary, inappropriate and even illegitimate action. Since CBP is not required to consider the effects of their actions, only Congress or the courts can rein them in. If left to the courts, the industry and our rights will be devastated and America will lose much, regardless of who wins the legal fight.
The definition of what is a switchblade has been clear and settled for the most part since the Federal Switchblade Act was passed in 1958 and has been reaffirmed by many years of legal decisions. The Act is very clear that a switchblade must have an activating button on the handle. Without a button, it is not a switchblade and this has been upheld by numerous cases on many levels over the years. CBP's convoluted reasoning in their proposal to reach back beyond the law and to expand their regulatory purview by rationalizing "intent" as justification for this new interpretation is a stretch, at best, and illegitimate at worst. It simply doesn't meet the common sense test.
CBP's reaching beyond the clear language of the Act in making this proposal is particularly questionable and irreconcilable because it flies in the face of virtually unanimous recent state court rulings (including several cases in California, Texas, Illinois and Michigan) where the issue of assisted-opening knives has already been decided in favor of the existing clear interpretation, that they are not a switchblade. They cherry-picked a few bizarre and untypical rulings from New York state from some years ago to provide support for their proposal, ignoring the many more recent rulings.
Beyond that, their significantly expanded interpretation of gravity and inertia knives, also included in the Act, would clearly make one-hand opening pocket knives illegal and according to industry sources, 80% of pocket knives sold today are one-hand or assisted openers. Beyond even that clearly excessively broad seizure of authority, we know from past unfortunate experience in many cases over the years that this sort of misinterpretation leads to potential abuse by law enforcement where even the most simple and innocuous Boy Scout folding pocket knife can be opened one-handed by use of dangerous and unsafe tricks, so that these too would be covered under this expanded federal definition. This ruling would therefore make almost all pocket knives subject to being considered switchblades.
The impact of this CBP ruling would go far beyond just imported knives because this "agency determination" will be used by domestic courts and law enforcement to determine what is a "switchblade" under both federal and state laws. Many states do not themselves define switchblades and simply rely on the federal definition and interpretation, which is only found in rulings by CBP. Since interstate commerce in switchblades is prohibited, except under very limited conditions, simply driving across a state line with a pocket knife in their possession would make someone a federal felon.
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John Grossbohlin wrote:

http://www.kniferights.org/U%20S%20Customs%20Proposed%20Ruling%20-%20Assisted%20Opening%20Knives.pdf

Once again, you ONLY have to look at the UK to see where this country will be in five to ten years.
It's that simple ... no crystal ball needed.
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All well and true (maybe). But what to do to prevent another Timothy McVeigh or James von Brunn from murdering innocent people.
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Han
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Han wrote:

What does that have to do with it? Anyone who thinks that morality can be legislated is part of the problem.
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museum have to die? Why did all those people in the Murrah building in Oklahoma City have to die? Or is that the risk of living?
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Han
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Han wrote: ...

It's a risk of living in a (moderately) open society, yes...
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I fail to see what Oklahoma and Timothy McVeigh have to do with gun/knife control! Perhaps I am confused, but perhaps controlling the sale of fertilizer and diesel fuel could have prevented Oklahoma! The point that so many gun control people miss is that if bad people want to do bad things they will find a way. Greg
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Han wrote:

Because there are bad people in the world.
Or is that the risk of living?

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Might want to rethink that question. Do you know of any one that will not eventually die? I suspect that more people die of natural causes than from weapons. Being killed has always been and will always be a risk of living.
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