The REAL Reasons We're Getting Kicked

Page 3 of 4  
George responds:

I see. You don't understand. Scalia has a case involving Cheney in front of him. That is not a speech to the NRA.
I dunno on the next one. Who do you know who is always quoting manufacturers' reps?
Charlie Self "We're 269 days from the election, and that's several political lifetimes." TERRY HOLT, Bush campaign spokesman.
http://hometown.aol.com/charliediy/myhomepage/business.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 06 Feb 2004 22:49:34 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote:

Snip, then:

Y'know, Charlie, I've totally stopped believing the gas-price thing. In '98, I could buy gas for about a buck or so. It threatened to go up, then _did_ go up, and everybody went nuts.
For a month or two.
Now it's around $1.50, (50% more (!!!)), and who really gives a crap? When's the last time it even made the list of table topics at the diner down the street? Seems that people just get used to whatever happens and adapt.
Me, I drive an economy car. Granted, I'm fortunate enough that it's a fairly nice econobox, but it's an upper 20s/gallon car just the same. I don't get the impression that SUV owners complain about gas prices for any reason other than they think they have to in order to be socially acceptable amoung us unfortunate po' folk. Which is a hoot to listen to as they wave bye-bye on the way to take Buffy to ballet.
I think I just forgot what my point was. :\
Michael
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I find this thread fascinating. People are saying it's fine to drive gas guzzlers because the cost of a new more fuel efficient car can't be justified by the savings in gas.
At the same time, we've got threads going lamenting the fact that Pentair is selling off Delta and the assumption that this will mean shipping manufacturing jobs overseas, and we should all buy American. One guy wants to know if his "Made in USA" router is really made here or just assembled here.
Well, gee guys, where do you think oil comes from? Most of ours is imported. Kuwait. Mexico. Venezuela. People get bent out of shape if you buy a Japanese car, but it's perfectly OK to burn 3 times more Kuwaiti oil in your Detroit gas guzzler than you would in a Japanese econobox.
For what it's worth, I drive a Chevy Metro which gets 30-something miles per gallon. I'm the gas hog in the family; my wife's Prius gets 45. If we all had averaged 38 MPG for the past 30 years, I be we wouldn't have fought 2 wars in Iraq in the last 10.
OK, I'll get off my soapbox now.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Roy Smith writes:

No. Tom said he HAS to drive a gas guzzler because he can't afford to replace it at the moment. Different thing entirely. It's a vehicle that is probably close to unsalable at the moment.

I drove a Chevy Metro until last year. Not bad for a car I had to put on like a girdle, but the seat backs kept snapping off. It's a Suzuki, anyway. I bought that little thing when I had a contract job that required a 65 mile daily round trip. My pick-up got about 14-15 mpg. Used Metro cost me $4600, IIRC. Of course, GM in its wisdom has quit making them.
Unfortunately for your premise, 30 years ago, there were almost no cars that got 38 mpg. Still aren't many.
Charlie Self "Don't go around saying the world owes you a living. The world owes you nothing. It was here first." Mark Twain
http://hometown.aol.com/charliediy/myhomepage/business.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) writes:

Chevy just introduced a new small car similiar to the Metro. Im sure it is also an import.

My parents bought a 1977 Ford LTD II. That thing was a tank and had a 302 V8, yet it was considered by many a compact car at the time.
Brian Elfert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Brian Elfert states:

Not very many. That was the first year I lived in Virginia, and I had 2 of the then compact cars, a '68 Valiant slant 6 and a 72 Plymouth Duster again with a slant 6. Neither vehicle got much over 22 MPG. I recently had a Crown Vic (well, about 5 years ago), and turned it in on the Metro. Amazing POS. Hardly room for my legs with the seat all the way back--and I'm only about 6'2". Arms cramped up against the steering wheel. Reminded me of why I'd quit buying Fords, though I did like my little 302 Mustang II 4 speed. Trouble was, it had enough power, added to a seriously short wheelbase, that stomping it on a dry road threated to spin it out, and it would break loose on a gob of spit. Lotta fun on dirt roads if you had the reflexes for it.
Charlie Self "We're 269 days from the election, and that's several political lifetimes." TERRY HOLT, Bush campaign spokesman.
http://hometown.aol.com/charliediy/myhomepage/business.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Charlie Self wrote:

Amaxing how technology has helped with fuel milage. I've had a bunch of small cars inthe 60s and 70s that got about 20 to 24 mpg. Corvair, LeMans, Karmann Ghia. I now have a full sized car that will outperform them in acceleration, top speed, comfort, trunk size, and just about anything else you name. It gets 24 mpg on a regular basis, 28 on the highway. Ed snipped-for-privacy@snet.net http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ed Pawlowski notes:

My first new car was a Chevy. '57 convertible, 283 V8, Duntov dual 4 barrel package, 3/4 race cam, close ratio 3 speed (on the column). Absolute blast to drive (stopping was a whole 'nother story). Two firsts: 14" tubeless tires; 12 volt battery. That was it for real tech. That car was something else, though: it would pass anything on the road but a gas station. Put your foot in it far enough to cut Carter #2 in and you were looking at something in the vicinity of 6 mpg.
Of course, back then, it didn't much matter, or we thought it didn't.
I wanted the fuel injection (mechanical), but that added something close to $500 to the price of an already expensive car (I seem to recal $3100). Just about everything made today has electronic fuel injection, solid state ignition, 50,000 mile (or more) plugs, no points, sealed breather system to keep oil fumes out of the air and dirps off the road and on, for a long list. Most don't have hgh compression engines, of course: I think that 283 was something on the order of 11 or 11-1/2 to 1. It would ping on extra sometimes (back when Esso Extra was probably 98 or 99 octane). And it was just about this time that Esso came out with Golden Esso Extra at $.38.9 per gallon. In Westchester County, NY, one of the most costly places in the country to live, then and now. But the higher end gas was needed for thinks like the Studebaker Hawk, and, a tiny bit later, the Studie Avanti. I seem to recall Chrysler's 300 getting really interesting about that time, too.
Then I joined the Marines, and any chance of even keeping the Chev left. Even back then, $78 a month before taxes wouldn't make the payments.
Charlie Self "We're 269 days from the election, and that's several political lifetimes." TERRY HOLT, Bush campaign spokesman.
http://hometown.aol.com/charliediy/myhomepage/business.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:
|Charlie Self wrote: |> |> Not very many. That was the first year I lived in Virginia, and I had |> 2 of the then compact cars, a '68 Valiant slant 6 and a 72 Plymouth |> Duster again with a slant 6. Neither vehicle got much over 22 MPG. |> Charlie Self| |Amaxing how technology has helped with fuel milage. I've had a bunch of |small cars inthe 60s and 70s that got about 20 to 24 mpg. Corvair, LeMans, |Karmann Ghia. I now have a full sized car that will outperform them in |acceleration, top speed, comfort, trunk size, and just about anything else |you name. It gets 24 mpg on a regular basis, 28 on the highway.
I have a 1999 Camaro SS that I bought new. The last new car I purchased before that was a 1969 Plymouth Roadrunner.
Pretty much the same concept. Big V-8, 2-door coupe, four passenger (if the Camaro rear seat passengers weigh 40 lbs.), wide tires, stiff suspensions and crappy build quality.
The Roadrunner was a 125 mph car with 50 mph brakes. The Camaro is a 150+ mph car with brakes to match.
The Roadrunner guzzled 100+ octane super premium leaded gasoline and spewed pollution. The Camaro runs on 91 octane unleaded and with modern fuel injection and dual catalytic converters puts out fewer pollutants than the average dairy cow.
The Roadrunner, on a good day got 10 mpg, the Camaro gets 2 1/2 times that.
A pristine 1969 Roadrunner is worth twice what a 1999 Camaro SS is worth [g].
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wes Stewart notes:

Oh, man. More memories. Those wide oval tires in '68, '69. Lasted at least 9000 miles if you didn't spin. But did improve the handling. Had a Barracuda 340S, one of the first off the line, in '68. I was still suffering whatever it is that makes you occasionally drift up on the Northway and lay into that sumbitch. First time my first wife hit 100 mph I was driving that and it matched my best from the '50s, too, at about 135 mph (indicated: probably more like 115). Sucker floated like crazy at 90 mph and up, and needed two aircraft carrier lengths to stop. Actually, to slow down, because those all 'round drum brakes were GONE after one modestly fast 125 to 50 slowdown. It was all gearbox and hope after that for at least 30 minutes. Which was the reason for heading for the Northway. Interstates are handy, especially back then at 3 a.m.
Charlie Self "We're 269 days from the election, and that's several political lifetimes." TERRY HOLT, Bush campaign spokesman.
http://hometown.aol.com/charliediy/myhomepage/business.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ideology is the threat.
People will fight (or just die) for their beliefs, even if it means starving.
Might want to snuggle up a bit to reality.
Oh yes, ever see how much energy a pound of uranium puts out?
Unfortunately, we can no more build the infrastructure for that than we can to make steel. Too many lawyers and Prius drivers.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Michael Baglio <mbaglio wrote:

What all you guys are not teking into account is how this affects _commerce_. Fine, you drive your 60 MPG Honda hybrid, but what about the shipping company that stocks the table saw you're about to buy? (LOL had to keep on topic!) Will you be demanding that Rockler use Honda hybrids too? What about railroads?
Don't you all know that commerce is the biggest energy user and biggest polluter out there? You think $2.00/gallon prices don't bite you in the ass? Of course it does. In many ways.
You might also think that the price of sugar in India does not make a difference to you, or the price of bananas from Colombia does not affect you, but it does. Just not directly.
--
gabriel

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Just saw on the news yesterday that in the DC area, gas has hit $1.64/gal for regular. up 9 cents in 2 weeks and 15 cents since January.
May not take til summer...
Renata
On 06 Feb 2004 22:49:34 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote: -snip-

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Renata writes:

Real life strikes again. It's currently from $1.67 to $1.74 here in WV on the OH border. Cheaper in VA, as usual. Friends out west talk routinely about $1.84 a gallon when it's $1.54 here.
Charlie Self "Love is not the dying moan of a distant violin - it's the triumphant twang of a bedspring." S. J. Perelman
http://hometown.aol.com/charliediy/myhomepage/business.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

$1.72 for regular here in Portlan Or.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 11 Feb 2004 10:27:55 -0500, Renata wrote:

The reason there is a big difference in the price of gasoline from state to state and even city to city is here:
http://www.lmoga.com/taxrates.htm
There appears to be a 24 cent/gallon difference from lowest to highest rates.
--
-Doug


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
That can't be the whole reason. California prices, from what I hear, are the highest nationwide. Where I am located (desert area) to where I work (LA area) the price has ben fairly constant the past several weeks at $2.10-$2-20. The DC tax is higher than the CA tax, thus the price should be higher there than here. Unless it's a supply thing. All the politicians producing a lot of their own gas. ;-) )
Glen

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Here is CT the gas companies do "zone pricing" and charge different prices in different areas. Why? Because they can get away with it. Has nothing to do with supply and demand or transportation cost. Affluent areas and inner cities are the highest because those people are lesss likely to travel just to buy cheaper gas. Ed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Perfect. Soak the "rich" folks. Time they paid their fair share.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

George, George, George, That is only valid if it's the government soaking the rich. If it's and eevil oil company, then it is pure rapacious capitalism that must be stopped. :-)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.