The problem I have with a laser on a DP

Here is I my problem I have with the laser on a/my DP.
The bit gets in the way unless it is raised up higher than necessary. The resolution "EVEN on the THIN line is double the width of the marked line. Suggestions?
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/6328221819/in/photostream/lightbox /
And as you can see, the laser lines pretty much hide the intersection of the lines on the paper. On oak the mark is pretty much impossible to see.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/6328221349/in/photostream/lightbox /
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You've got a point. Sounds like double perpendicular lines highlighting your scribed line would be much more efficient.
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On 11/9/2011 7:15 AM, Dave wrote:

Yeah that would probably be a way around the problem, I have noticed that one of the manufacturers of miter saws, maybe Festool, uses a double laser to establish where the blade will cut. You use the inside edge of the laser to establish where the blade will cut. Still the problem with that on the saw set up is that you dont cut on your line, you cut beside your line and your line could easily be hidden under the wider laser line.
IMHO the biggest problem with using a laser on most of this wood working equipment is that the lasers are "CHEAP". I suspect to get an accurate line that is 1/128" or less it is going to require a much higher quality laser.
Seriously the laser line needs to be thinner than the lines you mark on the wood, not the other way around.
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I have seen $ 600 lasers (x2) on a big-ass CNC and even those had problems with...what do I call it... effervescence, fluorescence, scatter? The material bounces the -ever-so-fine laser line (green in this case) all over the place and sets up a glow. The rougher the material the worst it gets (Obviously)...BUT, white melamine was the worst of them all. I think they're gimmicky in too many applications, but nice for cabinet lay-out and rough work. If I really want to know where I am going on the DP or CNC, I load a centre point prior to drilling.
In the meantime, I'll ignore the lasers mounted on nose-hair trimmers, snow-shovels, yard rakes and dinner forks.
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On 11/9/2011 9:55 AM, Robatoy wrote:

LOL I have not seen any of those laser enhanced tools yet but I am thinking a laser on a hammer, or screw driver, or pencil for gosh sakes. Maybe even an eraser.
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"Leon" wrote

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On 11/9/2011 12:06 PM, Lee Michaels wrote:

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On 11/9/2011 9:55 AM, Robatoy wrote:

Ok! I actually saw this on Cool Tools last night. A conventional hand saw with a laser in the lower part of the handle.
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Mark with chalk.
Problem solved.
--
FF


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Consider distance - that improves the angle.
I used tacked up marks on the wall in my old shop - Aiming 20' or so is tough - I used binoculars to spot the dot on the far wall as I nudged the partially tightened stand.
If your laser can't split and spot a distant wall - get a new laser.
Shooting off a fuzzy edge will reflect a fuzzy beam. Develop a new method.
Try shooting the beam directly - is it sharp or fuzzy.
Martin
On 11/10/2011 4:24 PM, Fred the Red Shirt wrote:

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On 11/10/2011 9:49 PM, Martin Eastburn wrote:

I think my point is that you don't need a laser to hit your mark on a DP.
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Of course not. Else, past generations of woodworkers would have built junk. Trouble is that lasers for woodworking fell into the same category as early digital watches. They became mass produced crap without any quality attached to them ~ all to satisfy the fascination with new technology.
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In wrote:

Or tape
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I was going to suggest the center point tool but Robatoy beat me to it. That is a foolproof way. WW
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Your laser looks like shit compared to mine. Nanananana.
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On 11/9/2011 12:32 PM, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

LOL.. I would certainty hope sooooo.
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My Ryboi has the same problem. The better solution is simply not to use a laser at all, but perhaps a LED mounted on a gooseneck would be nice. All I'm trying to do is eliminate the shadows that make a line hard to see sometimes.
Puckdropper
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Scribelines, knife lines, punch marks and lasers: All guesses. + or - .010" is the typical resolution of target with these lab helpers. Some background on the problem: http://patwarner.com/holding_the_work.html ************************************************************

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"routerman" wrote in message
Scribelines, knife lines, punch marks and lasers: All guesses. + or - .010" is the typical resolution of target with these lab helpers. Some background on the problem: http://patwarner.com/holding_the_work.html ************************************************************
For your average amateur, you're probably right. I can hit a layout line within .003 all day long. Of course, that's in metal. In wood, maintaining those kinds of tolerances is about impossible but you can easily lay out and hit the mark very accurately. Even in wood, if I were to miss by .010, I would be HIGHLY disappointed in myself.
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