The Gorilla Glue challenge match

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snipped-for-privacy@aol.comGreg (Gfretwell) wrote in

Haven't seen the answer posted yet, so I'm going to bet on yellow glue as the stronger on the milled wood, and gorilla on the rough-sawn woods (since it's got some gap-filling abilities). Overall I bet for the milled maple/yellow glue combination as the strongest.
John
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You are the winner! (probably)
I clamped each sample up in a vice, used the "long" craftsman screwdriver for leverage to control the pull. I measured the tension 1.5" from the joint with a fish scale and broke them
The milled maple was certainly the winner, being stronger than my scale would register >24 lbs in a tear but my perception was the yellow glue held on a bit longer. We will call them a dead heat based on the other results.
I worked up in 2 lb increments first with a shear, trying to spin the cross, then the same pull straight away tearing the joint
In sawn maple and sawn cedar all of the joints sustained 14 lbs in a "shear" pull from 1.5" out and they all failed in a 12-14 lb tear. The yellow glue in the cedar did seem to hold on better in the cedar, resisting the initial pull but then starting to go slowly eventually tearing out a chunk of wood. I imagine there was wood damage on the microscopic scale in all of them but this was the only sample with naked eye wood damage. Poly glue seems more brittle, snapping clean every time..
My conclusion is if you don't need the water proofing you are wasting your money on poly glue.
Now I have to run the same test on this $300 worth of cypress I have before I lay up my counter top. I'm using yellow glue on the maple one.
BTW my 24x24 cutting board came out OK and it hasn't fallen apart yet. I am guessing the strength is > 13.5 PSI in the joints, based on my test ;-)
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On 22 Aug 2003 18:22:38 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comGreg (Gfretwell) wrote:
I

I don't see this unless I do something wrong or i am using a wood that is too oily. the wood tears off when I break it apart. but I see good joints in more normal woods no matter what glue I use. if the joint is breaking before the wood something is not right with the glue up or the glue.
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