the first power tool

Page 1 of 8  
i was doing some drilling with the drill press today and appreciated the fact that i just applied downward force to drill a big hole with a forstner bit and the motor did the rest
compared to an attempt with a brace and bit recently i am very aware that a drill press is good
but it got me thinking about the succession of power tools in a historical perspective
i figure the saw was the first one to get some power behind it with those big lumber mills saws
but what was next i think power drills must have been the next one
power in this sense is not animal powered
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/14/2015 8:28 PM, Electric Comet wrote:

I suspect you are right about the first power tools being those used in sawmills. However I suspect that the reciprocating saw was used before the circular saw. A reciprocation saw could be connected to a water wheel and operated with a cam. The circular saw would need a complicated set of gears to make spin
Before the Circular saw was used probably the most common type of saw was what was called a Pit saw. It was a cross cut saw, and was used on a on a platform pit arrangement. One person on the platform that other person in the pit and the log between them.
On this line of thought another power tool may have been the water powered hammer mill.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
says...

Why would it need gears? Just turn the shaft with a belt.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'm finding it difficult, so far, to pin down the first tool driven by other than hand, but here's something relevant to what we commonly call power tools:
In 1895, 16 years after Thomas Edison invented the incandescent electric lamp, the German engineering company C&E Fein combined the power of an electric motor with a manual drill to develop the world's very first power tool. (It was about 19 years later that Mr. Black and Mr. Decker teamed up to improve on this invention by making it lighter, more powerful and capable of being operated by a single DIYer<g>)
(maybe that's why they are so expensive... A company that old, if it didn't properly fund its pension debt could have quite a bill coming due 120 years down the pike.<g>)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
says...

Interesting, but that's a very narrow definition of "power tool". Steam locomotives are tools and the first of those went into service around 1804. And then there was John Henry and the steam drill . . .
I don't know when the first powered tool went into service, but the Romans had a sawmill running around 300 AD.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/15/2015 12:09 PM, J. Clarke wrote:

[snip]

I agree, but the OP's question was rather vague and the followup answers wandered all over the place as well.
Just to throw some more sh*t in the game, the first time a human hooked an animal to any device that performed some sort of work on behalf of said human could probably be said to be a power tool driven by other than the user's hand power.
When were the Pyramids built? Inca temples? Surely if a system of ropes and pulley or levers were employed they would be classed as tools. Add one animal to the equation and we're talking power tool in the context of the OP's question<g>
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

OP specifically excluded tools using animal power (which presumably also includes human power).
There's a bit of a fuzzyness there, tho, if you consider stored power. If an animal compresses a spring, or carries water to an elevated tank, and that is then later used to power a tool is it still animal powered?
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@ix.netcom.com says...

Flashing on "The Windup Girl". If your date is powered by springs wound up by animals, then what?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 16 Aug 2015 13:19:54 -0400, "J. Clarke"

Muskrat love?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 16 Aug 2015 14:36:51 +0000 (UTC)

that is water powered
just like using the force of methane gas emanating from a cow to turn the blades of a windmill would still be wind powered you could even ignite and it would still be wind powered unless the cow goes too
now in the south pacific they use solar power during the day because there is plenty of sun but at night they had a problem so they use solar power pumps to pump water to elevation and at night they rely on water power to watch their favorite shows
but really it is gravity at work but we still call it water power
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/17/2015 3:15 PM, Electric Comet wrote:

Yes water power.
The stored water could have gotten there by a few different ways, rain, run off from a river, etc.
It does not really matter how the stored energy gets there, the energy that directly powers the tool is what drives the tool.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

They do the reverse thing in Colorado - at night when electric demand is low, they use the excess electricity to pump water up to a lake way up in the mountains, and in the daytime when they need extra capacity, they let it flow back down thru generators.
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 08/17/2015 02:03 PM, John McCoy wrote:

Also at Grand Coulee. The water is used for irrigation, recreation and power generation.
http://www.usbr.gov/pn/grandcoulee/pubs/powergeneration.pdf
--
"Socialism is a philosophy of failure,the creed of ignorance, and the
gospel of envy, its inherent virtue is the equal sharing of misery"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 08/17/2015 4:57 PM, Doug Winterburn wrote:

And at Smith Mtn Reservoir in VA (as well as several other pumped-storage facilities)
--



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 17 Aug 2015 21:03:26 +0000 (UTC)

seems like the right thing to do how can that happen
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 17 Aug 2015 21:03:26 +0000 (UTC), John McCoy

This makes no sense unless there is some other cheap source of energy that can't be easily throttled, nearby (like a nuke).

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/17/2015 9:11 PM, krw wrote:

I dunno. It seems unusual but...
I don't think they have that much control over the hydroelectric generation. They build a damn, water level rises and they harness the flow to generate needed power. If their capacity exceeds their needs and the needs of other areas or power companies tied into their production, what can they do? Surely they can cut out the generators and stop production and just let the water bypass the turbines. They can't stop the water flow or it will cause flooding.
I liken the Colorado "solution" to a storage battery. They are charging up a power source capable of providing, perhaps, additional hydroelectric capacity during peak demand or, alternatively (as someone mentioned), provide water for irrigation. Simple case (or maybe not so simple logistically) of making the most of what they have?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/17/2015 10:24 PM, Unquestionably Confused wrote:

Not to mention screaming users down stream.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Hydro plants, whether pumped storage or natural reservoirs, have the chief characteristic that the power generation can be adjusted rapidly by adjusting the flow through the penstocks.
For this reason, hydro plants are used as 'peakers', i.e. plants that are brought on-line to supply generation during peak usage periods and to quickly adjust to variable generation supplies (solar, wind) while the baseload plants run at optimal efficiency.
Pumped storage will use electricity during off-prime periods when the cost is less to pump water into the reservoir, and during prime periods will use that water to supply peak generation needs.
Some pumped storage alternates on a daily basis between pumping and generation, while others (e.g. San Luis Reservoir) stores water in the wet months for power use during the dry summer months (with the advantage that the released water is subsequently used for irrigation in the central valley or for delivery to the LA basin via the California Aquaduct).
http://cdec.water.ca.gov/cgi-progs/stationInfo?station_id=SNL
Last decade (dry years are obvious in the plot):
http://cdec.water.ca.gov/jspplot/jspPlotServlet.jsp?sensor_no778&end %2F18%2F2015+08%3A11&geom=huge&interval650&cookiesec01
In other cases (trinity->whiskeytown->shasta->keswick) the same water may be used four or five times for generation before it reaches the ocean or central valley.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 17 Aug 2015 22:24:36 -0500, Unquestionably Confused

SO where are they going to pump the water to?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.